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Stateside Staff

Stateside 7.11.2018

Jul 11, 2018

Today on Stateside, as more states (including Michigan) consider legalizing recreational marijuana, how will cops be able to tell who is too stoned to drive? Plus, there was no spitting, cussing, or mitts allowed in the "gentlemanly game" of early baseball.  

The Walker Tavern Wheels pose in their uniforms in front of a scoreboard
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

This weekend, baseball fans will roll the clock way back, more than 150 years.

There's a four-game tournament of early baseball happening at Cambridge Junction Historic State Park in Brooklyn, Michigan.

That's where the Walker Tavern Wheels will be hosting an invitational with the Saginaw Old Golds, the Detroit Early Risers, and the Canton Cornshuckers.

Lauren Duski
Facebook.com

 

You just never know when life has a great big surprise waiting just around the corner for you.

Just when you think it’s time to put your music dream on the shelf and go to dental school, you get a call from producers of NBC's The Voice, asking you to audition for the TV singing competition.

That’s how Gaylord’s Lauren Duski wound up with Blake Shelton as her mentor, ultimately landing in second place on the 2017 season of The Voice and getting her big break. 

marijuana bud
Pixabay

 


Michigan residents will vote on the legalization of recreational marijuana November 9. 

The state has strict laws against driving while drunk, and cops can test how intoxicated someone is with a quick breathalyzer test. 

But if weed is legalized, how will law enforcement identify someone who is driving while high? 

Jason / FLICKR: HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

With the tap of your finger, you can access pretty much anything these days, whether you're streaming a movie or ordering a pair of shoes. But just 50 years ago, Michigan had a law banning most businesses from being open on Sunday. 

That law, which was upheld by the United States Supreme Court in 1962, fell into a category of “blue laws.”

Screen showing Line 5 on the bottom of the Straits of Mackinac.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Has Governor Snyder's team partnered with Enbridge Energy in deciding the fate of Line 5?

That's the question explored in a joint investigation by Bridge Magazine and the Michigan Campaign Finance Network.

Stateside 7.10.2018

Jul 10, 2018

Today on Stateside, a grassroots effort to help migrant parents with transportation and resources after being reunited with their kids. Plus, a long-running Detroit concert celebrating cultural diversity through music inspires a sister festival in Jackson. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Three migrant dads reunited with their children in Grand Rapids

Rabbi Josh Whinston
Kathryn Condon / Michigan Radio

  

The plight of migrant children being separated from their families at detention centers has grabbed the attention of many across the country. The first reunification deadline to reunite children under five with their families was Tuesday.

From this crisis many grassroots groups have sprung up, as parents, teachers, foster parents, and religious leaders search for ways to help migrant families who were separated.

Frédéric Hamelin / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGLC0

This week brings the 26th go-round for Detroit's annual Concert of Colors presented by the Arab American National Museum.

The event starts tomorrow and runs through Sunday. It celebrates cultural diversity through music and the spoken word.

This year, the Concert of Colors has inspired a sister festival in Jackson. It's called the Jackson Unity Festival.

Ever Reyes Mejia and his 3 year old son leaving the ICE office in Grand Rapids.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Three parents were able to finally see their children again today in Grand Rapids.

It had been three months since these dads seeking asylum in the U.S. were separated from their children. All of whom are under five years old.

The latest rendering of the Gordie Howe International Bridge.
Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority

Things appear to be moving ahead for construction on a new bridge between Detroit and Windsor. Last week, a consortium of builders was chosen to construct the Gordie Howe International Bridge.

However, trade tensions between the U.S. and Canada continue to rise, and the Moroun family — owners of the rival Ambassador Bridge — recently ran an oppositional ad on Fox and Friends asking President Trump to stop construction of the bridge.

Peretz Partensky / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Insurance companies base their business on looking for ways to minimize risk.

For example, a life insurance company will ask you whether you scuba dive.

But there is one risk they don't calculate: insurance companies do not ask whether you own a gun.

Kristen Moore is an associate professor of Mathematics at the University of Michigan. She co-authored a piece for The Actuary Magazine exploring how the insurance industry treats the risk of firearms. 

Theater lights on curtains
Jad Limcaco / Unsplash

It’s time for another edition of Theater Talk with David Kiley, editor-in-chief of Encore Michigan. Kiley joined Stateside to preview and review plays opening around Michigan this month.

Stateside 7.9.2018

Jul 9, 2018

On Stateside today, President Trump's tariffs on imported steel and aluminum have caused some chaos in the global markets. But would tariffs and trade wars matter as much if we did a better job of recycling scrap metal? Plus, 18 years after arriving at Frederik Meijer Gardens as a seedling, a corpse flower named Putricia makes her debut. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

InstituteForApprenticeships / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

This year's high school graduates have walked across the stage and received their diplomas. Now it's time to decide: what comes next?

The manufacturing industry is hoping that at least some of those students will decide heading straight from high school into a four-year-college program is not the only path to a successful life and a well-paying job.

Discover Manufacturing is a West Michigan program working to close the talent gap, get rid of old stereotypes of a "factory job,” and help students pursue careers in manufacturing.

steel bars
Pixabay

 


On Friday, President Trump's first tariffs hit $34 billion worth of Chinese imports.

Beijing quickly responded with its own tariffs on equal amounts of American-made goods. Many believe that this back-and-forth between China and U.S. is the start of a trade war.

Imported steel and aluminum are one of the main targets of Trump’s latest tariffs. 

Dan Cooper is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Michigan. He sat down with Stateside's Cynthia Canty to discuss why these tariffs would have minimal effect on the U.S. if the country did a better job recycling its scrap metal. 

Wayne State University Press

She brought us the stories of Great Girls in Michigan History. Now, writer Patricia Majher is focusing on the boys.

Her new book is Bold Boys in Michigan History.

In it, Majher tells the stories of Michigan boys who did remarkable things before they were 20. These bold young men include a filmmaker, musicians, inventors, athletes, a politician, and more.

A corpse flower blooming
Courtesy of Meijer Gardens

It's a momentous week at the Frederik Meijer Gardens.

Its once-tiny corpse flower is now a strapping plant, reaching several feet high, and it's about to bloom for the very first time. 

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder.
Courtesy of Governor Snyder's office

Recent blogs from the free-market think tank the Mackinac Center for Public Policy applauded Governor Snyder's $10 million cut to what it calls "the state’s corporate and industrial handout complex." 

Tonya Schuitmaker
Senate PhotoWire

 

On August 25th, Republicans will meet for the 2018 state convention to nominate candidates. 

Among those vying for the nomination for Michigan Attorney General are Representative Tom Leonard, currently Speaker of the House, and state Senator Tonya Schuitmaker.

Stateside 7.6.2018

Jul 6, 2018

On today's Stateside, Congressman Dan Kildee talks about his visit to one of the centers that house migrant children separated from their parents at the border. Plus, a Zeeland drum maker who makes everything from snare drums to professional quality tambourines. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Group sitting on rug
Riverwise Website

Detroit-based quarterly magazine, Riverwise, focuses on activism and neighborhood concerns in Detroit and is now looking to find and train writers.

Managing editor Eric Campbell joined Stateside to talk about the magazine and the vision that brought it to life. 

Grand Rapids
Steven Depolo / Flickr

Michigan members of Congress from both sides of the political aisle visited a refugee foster care facility in Grand Rapids today.

Democrats Debbie Dingell and Dan Kildee, along with Republican Bill Huizenga are urging the Trump administration to speed up the process of reuniting families separated at the southern border.

Stateside 7.5.2018

Jul 5, 2018

On Stateside today, Joanne Savas didn't have a fortune to pass on to her grandkids, so she came up with a different kind of inheritance: a book. Plus, a look at the many ways America has tried - and failed -  to tackle poverty in one of the the world's richest countries.

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Joanne Savas in the studio holding a piece of a child's artwork
Lindsey Scullen / Michigan Radio

You don't need worldly goods or a big bank account to leave a priceless gift to your grandkids.

Joanna Savas of Ann Arbor wasn't able to leave large inheritances for her seven grandchildren, so she came up with something else: a book. 

people in voting booths
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

There is just over a month to go before Michigan’s primary elections on August 7th. 

WikiCommons

Poverty is an issue that dates back to ancient times. In the Christian gospel of John, Jesus says to his disciple Judas: “You will always have the poor among you.”

So what can society do about it?

An image of a silver bitcoin
Zach Copley / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

Cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin or the more than 1,500 other cryptocurrencies, are making some people rich. 

They're also opening up something new: your computer could be using its processor power, its memory, and your electricity to help make money for someone else. The process is called cryptojacking.

 

A group of Sae Jong Campers
Sae Jong Camp

 


Summer camp means many things to campers, outdoor fun or just a chance to get away from parents and siblings.

For kids who come to Sae Jong Camp on Higgins Lake, it is also chance to be with others who share their heritage.

Sae Jong Camp is the nation's oldest continuously running Korean-American overnight summer camp.

It's held each year at Camp Westminster in Roscommon drawing campers from all around the country. This year marks the 44th anniversary of Sae Jong Camp.

Stateside 7.4.18

Jul 4, 2018

On the program today we bring you some of our memorable interviews from past shows including, how to know when it's time to seek mental health treatment, and what happens when a bookstore puts a typewriter and paper out for anyone to use. 

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