WUOMFM

A recap of what has become law so far in this legislative session

Apr 21, 2015

Credit Courtesy of Governor Snyder's office

All through this current session of the state Legislature, Detroit Free Press Lansing reporter Kathy Gray has been tracking the bills that cleared the House and Senate and then were signed into law by Gov. Rick Snyder.

This legislative session 700 bills and 125 resolutions have already been introduced, according to Gray. So far Snyder has signed 16 of those.

Gray says last legislative session close to 1,500 bills were introduced and 40% ended up becoming law.

This session the first two bills signed by Gov. Snyder set March 8, 2016, for the presidential primary next year, "which is kind of interesting, seeing as all of a sudden he's been fueling rumors that he might run for president," Gray says.

The governor has also signed bills that would eliminate county gun licensing boards, instead transferring the authority to Michigan State Police and county clerks.

Another bill has restricted the use of drones for hunting or for the harassment of hunters with the technology.

And $24.7 million from the Natural Resources Trust Fund will be transferred into different projects for development or land purchases that would go toward recreation in the state after gaining approval from Snyder.

The governor has also approved of giving $3 million to autism programs at several universities in the state.

"It's kind of a mishmash of bills," Gray says.

Recently, though, there has been more focus on one issue: the budget. And Gray says many of the upcoming bills will focus on this issue.

"Right now we're deep into the budget season and that's going to be taking up most of the air in the room," she says.

Along with the budget, Gray says we can expect to see discussion of adoption policy that would allow faith-based adoption agencies to decide whom they would allow or exclude when choosing potential parents.

"There's a lot of things that are coming up. Whether or not they make it to the governor's desk before they go on their summer break, that's another thing," Gray says.