Stateside: Wayne Co. tax auction controversy; Midland’s mid-century architecture; policy potholes | Michigan Radio
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Stateside: Wayne Co. tax auction controversy; Midland’s mid-century architecture; policy potholes

Feb 12, 2019

Today on Stateside, Benton Harbor's emerging problem with lead in drinking water, and what it tells us about the risk of lead in other Michigan communities. Plus, the city of Midland is documenting its unique, and massive, treasure trove of mid-century modern architecture. So far, they've found more than 400 structures. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Wayne Co. treasurer’s family’s purchase of foreclosed properties raises ethical concerns 

  • According to Wayne County rules, family members of the county treasurer aren't allowed to take part in tax foreclosure auctions. But a Detroit News investigation finds that Wayne County Treasurer Eric Sabree and his relatives have been ignoring that rule. 
  • Christine MacDonald is a reporter for The Detroit News covering this story. MacDonald breaks down how she discovered that Sabree was in violation of county rules, how he’s responded so far, and how this story fits within a larger narrative about the handling of foreclosures and auctions in Wayne County.

Theater Talk: Connections between women; a musical about life with bipolar; a play gone wrong (on purpose)

  • It’s time to talk theater with David Kiley of Encore Michigan. He lays out some of the most notable shows coming to professional theaters around the state this month. His picks include Steel Magnolias at The Dio in Pinckney, Never Not Once at The Purple Rose in Chelsea, and the Pulitzer-Prize winning Next to Normal at the Encore Musical Theatre in Dexter.

How the city of Midland became a hub of mid-century modern architecture

  • The city of Midland has a unique concentration of mid-century modern structures. For the past two years, volunteers have been documenting the city’s architectural treasure trove. Craig McDonald is director of the Alden B. Dow Home and Studio in Midland. McDonald tells us about some of the defining features of mid-century modern architecture, how Midland ended up with so much of it, and how the project is making the city's architectural gems accessible through a new mobile app.

Benton Harbor's lead problem is nothing like Flint's. That's the scary part.

  • It’s been a little over three months since people in Benton Harbor learned that a number of homes in their city had elevated levels of lead in their drinking water. Since then, there’s been more testing. Of about 300 samples, more than 50 homes showed elevated lead levels. As Michigan Radio’s Dustin Dwyer explains, it’s a problem that could become more common in Michigan as water systems around the state get older.

Do you have lead in your water? How to figure it out, and what to do next.

  • Michigan Radio Senior Editor Sarah Hulett joins Stateside to shed more light on the emerging lead contamination issue in Benton Harbor. She breaks down how the city discovered lead in its water, and what you can do to protect yourself if you find out your water goes through a lead service line.

Michigan’s potholes extend beyond just roads

  • A key part of Governor Whitmer’s campaign promise was to “fix the damn roads.” As she prepares to deliver her first State of the State address tonight, Chad Livengood of Crain’s Detroit Business has prepared his review of the policy potholes that line Michigan’s economic path, and the problems that face the Governor and her team.

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