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Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Allana St. Laurents standing in front of photographs
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The Ann Arbor Art Fair is underway, and as usual, it is a huge event. This year's fair features around 1,000 artists, and will draw thousands more visitors to the city's downtown.

Stateside's Lester Graham braved the the crowds and the traffic to talk to some of the artists showcasing their work, and the people who came to see it all. 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

It is the most famous drink to ever come out of Detroit. It is known worldwide as the hummer.

“This was created by a bartender at the Bayview Yacht Club named Jerome Adams in 1968,” explained Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings.

Adams had recently gotten a job as a bartender at the Detroit yacht club. He wanted to come up with a drink that would impress his colleagues and impress his customers, Coxen said.

The Dotty Wotty House, The Heidelberg Project.
Courtesy of The Heidelberg Project.

The first ever Detroit Art Week is set to run July 20, 21, and 22. Organizers bill it as "a self-guided tour and celebration of contemporary art and culture in Detroit."

Amani Olu, the founder and executive director of Detroit Art Week, joined Stateside to tell us about the event.

Sydney Baird

We've been capturing quirky summer festivals around Michigan.

One festival that fits the bill is the 28th National Baby Food Festival in Fremont, Michigan, where Gerber has been making baby food in since 1928.

Sydney Baird, the co-coordinator of the National Baby Food Festival, joined Stateside to talk about the upcoming festival.

concert
Yvette de Wit / Unsplash

Detroit's music scene will welcome the sixth annual Mo Pop Festival at the end of the month.

Our guide to Detroit music, as always, is Paul Young, the founder and publisher of Detroit Music Magazine. He joined Stateside to highlight three local acts that will take the stage at Mo Pop.

Stateside 7.16.2018

Jul 16, 2018

Today on Stateside, a look at the business organizations tied to challenges of controversial ballot proposals, including mininum wage, electoral redistricting, and paid sick time. Plus, grab your s'mores supplies and gather 'round for the first campfire story in our summer series. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Boots Riley on the set of Sorry to Bother You
Courtesy of Annapurna Pictures

Sorry to Bother You is billed as a sci-fi comedy, and is playing in theaters nationwide after debuting at Sundance Film Festival.

It's about the story of a young black telemarketer from Oakland, California named Cassius Green, played by Lakeith Stanfield. An older co-worker, played by Danny Glover, offers advice that helps Cassius climb the ladder to telemarketing success by using his "white voice."

Patrik Nygren / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

One of the very best ways to enjoy summer in Michigan is to park yourself under a tree or on a beach and get lost in a good book.

Poet Keith Taylor joined Stateside to talk about some of his suggestions for your summer reading list.

Recently retired as a creative writing teacher at the University of Michigan, Taylor just published another book called Ecstatic Destinations about his Ann Arbor neighborhood.

If we had our druthers, we would spend every morning nerding out about language and grammar. 

Fortunately, we do get the opportunity to flex our language muscles every Sunday. We're also fortunate to have awesome listeners like Kalen, who recently asked us where the phrase "if I had my druthers" comes from.

1969 Ann Arbor Blues Festival
Baron Wolman

This summer begins a year-long celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Ann Arbor Blues Festival. The festivities kick off with a photo exhibit at the Ann Arbor Art Fair next week. The photos feature behind-the-scenes images from the 1969-1970 festivals.

the Four Tops in concert
Arnie Lee / Wikimedia Commons - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The Four Tops, the Temptations, and the Stylistics will be performing this Saturday at the Legends of Motown Show in Sterling Heights.

Abdul "Duke" Fakir, a founding member of the Four Tops, joined Stateside to talk about the show and the band's history.

Lauren Duski
Facebook.com

 

You just never know when life has a great big surprise waiting just around the corner for you.

Just when you think it’s time to put your music dream on the shelf and go to dental school, you get a call from producers of NBC's The Voice, asking you to audition for the TV singing competition.

That’s how Gaylord’s Lauren Duski wound up with Blake Shelton as her mentor, ultimately landing in second place on the 2017 season of The Voice and getting her big break. 

Frédéric Hamelin / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGLC0

This week brings the 26th go-round for Detroit's annual Concert of Colors presented by the Arab American National Museum.

The event starts tomorrow and runs through Sunday. It celebrates cultural diversity through music and the spoken word.

This year, the Concert of Colors has inspired a sister festival in Jackson. It's called the Jackson Unity Festival.

Theater lights on curtains
Jad Limcaco / Unsplash

It’s time for another edition of Theater Talk with David Kiley, editor-in-chief of Encore Michigan. Kiley joined Stateside to preview and review plays opening around Michigan this month.

Mercedes Mejia/Michigan Radio

Her stage name is Stephie James, but friends and family here in Michigan know her best as Stephanie Hamood.

The Nashville based singer-songwriter got her start playing gigs at a coffee shop her family opened near Detroit. 

Now, after years of touring with big name bands, James is getting ready to release her debut album later this year.

Stateside 7.9.2018

Jul 9, 2018

On Stateside today, President Trump's tariffs on imported steel and aluminum have caused some chaos in the global markets. But would tariffs and trade wars matter as much if we did a better job of recycling scrap metal? Plus, 18 years after arriving at Frederik Meijer Gardens as a seedling, a corpse flower named Putricia makes her debut. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Wayne State University Press

She brought us the stories of Great Girls in Michigan History. Now, writer Patricia Majher is focusing on the boys.

Her new book is Bold Boys in Michigan History.

In it, Majher tells the stories of Michigan boys who did remarkable things before they were 20. These bold young men include a filmmaker, musicians, inventors, athletes, a politician, and more.

When it comes to the internet, seemingly innocuous topics are often the grounds for heated debates. Is the dress blue and black or gold and white? Is this voice saying "yanny" or saying "laurel"?

Group sitting on rug
Riverwise Website

Detroit-based quarterly magazine, Riverwise, focuses on activism and neighborhood concerns in Detroit and is now looking to find and train writers.

Managing editor Eric Campbell joined Stateside to talk about the magazine and the vision that brought it to life. 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Eric Sooy is showing me some of his percussion skills on a snare drum. He made that drum. Sooy is the president and founder of Black Swamp Percussion in Zeeland, Michigan. His company makes percussion instruments that have made it to symphony concert halls, rock and roll stages, and recording studios.

Courtesy of Toni Trucks

Michigan born-and-raised actors may wind up working in New York or Hollywood, but they make sure the world knows they’re from the mitten.

Toni Trucks has been in a host of movies and TV shows, including her current roles as Lisa Davis in “SEAL Team” on CBS. Trucks began her performing career here in Manistee, and now she’s giving back to her hometown by loaning it her voice.

Courtesy of Michael Gustafson

On the first day that Michael Gustafson and his wife Hilary opened Literati Bookstore in the heart of downtown Ann Arbor, something possessed him to place a typewriter on a table for anyone to use.

That was in the spring of 2013. Since then, Gustafson’s “public typewriter experiment” has yielded a treasure trove of notes: some droll, some heartbreaking, some witty, some poignant.

Major Murphy
Daniel Topete / Facebook

This very hot summer week is a great time to find some new music to enjoy, preferably indoors and in front of an air conditioner.

John Sinkevics, editor and publisher of Local Spins, joined us once again for our monthly look at West Michigan's music scene. 

Michael Zadoorian
Doug Coombe


No matter your age or your generation, the music you listened to in high school claims a special place in your heart.

Many kids use music to help overcome the trials and tribulations of adolescence. 

Michael Zadoorian’s new novel Beautiful Music centers around one of those kids. He talked to Stateside about how the music of 1970s Detroit inspired the book. 

For several months now, English Professor Anne Curzan has been combing through various editions of the New York Times Manual of Style and Usage to see how usage rules have changed over time.

painting of man on table with doctors above him
Mario Moore / Courtesy of David Klein Gallery


Is it possible for a black man to rest in an institutionally oppressive society? 

That is the question Mario Moore wants to tackle in his art. 

Moore is mixed-medium artist and a Detroit native. He sat down with Stateside to discuss his new exhibition “Recovering” which opens this weekend at the David Kline Gallery in downtown Detroit. 

still from cartoon Big City Greens
© 2018 Disney Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved.

The Disney Channel has just rolled out a new animated kid series called Big City Greens.

Chris and Shane Houghton, brothers and co-creators of Big City Greens, grew up in Clinton County, Michigan in the small town of St. Johns.

The television show is about a family that moves from the countryside to the big city. The family’s trajectory is not unlike that of Chris and Shane, who moved from a small town in Michigan to the big metropolis that is Los Angeles.

Credit: Detroit Institute of Arts

An exhibition of "accidental" art will open at the Detroit Institute of Arts on August 26th.

"Lost & Found: Photographs from the DIA's Collection" will be a collection of photographs from around the U.S. and Detroit, taken by unknown and often untrained photographers.

Some of the work will feature James Pearson Duffy, an amateur photographer and collector, who made over 500 photographs of Detroit in the early 1970's, and Peter Cohen, an acclaimed vernacular photography collector.

ArtPrize event in Grand Rapids
Rich Evenhouse / flickr user

The Grand Rapids Art Prize festival will no longer be an annual event after this fall.  

In 2019 and every alternating year afterward, there will be a citywide art project – or "Project 1" as organizers are calling it – during the time the festival would take place.

The tenth annual ArtPrize event will be this fall from September 19 to October 7.  The eleventh festival will be in fall 2020.

Organizers did not make it clear why the changes were made, but Project 1 will include free arts and culture programming that are open to the community.

Kalamazoo Ladies Library reading room
Courtesy of the Kalamazoo Ladies Library

The nation's oldest documented structure built for women, by women, was a lending library right here in Michigan. 

The Kalamazoo Ladies Library Association (LLA), loosely formed in 1852, has been holding meetings in its historic red brick Venetian Gothic style building since 1879.

Marge Kars, a former president of the organization, joined Stateside to talk about its history as the city’s first lending library.

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