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Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Stateside 4.10.2018

Apr 10, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear about a national report card that shows Michigan schools are below average, and Detroit schools are worst. Also today, a meteorologist predicts this cold April will turn into a "nice, warm" May and June, and we check in with 2018 gubernatorial candidate Bill Cobbs.

Jeffrey Smith / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

It’s time for another edition of Theater Talk. David Kiley, editor-in-chief of Encore Michigan, joined Stateside to preview and review plays around Michigan.

As designated word nerds, we here at That's What They Say whole-heartedly admit that sometimes we do things in our spare time that are a bit, well, geeky. But also pretty fascinating.

For instance, English Professor Anne Curzan has been been working on a project that traces changes in the New York Times style guide. She's been perusing stylebooks from the beginning of the 20th century to the present to see what has changed over time.


Lester Graham/Michigan Radio

We like to talk with people who make things we use. This time we make a stop in Jackson.

Chris Maples has been making ice fishing rods for a couple of decades. His company is called Frozen Puppy Custom Ice Rods

He designs the rod handles and hand ties everything. He makes the kind of rods that he likes, but he's open to what his customers want. Listen to his story above.

University of Wisconsin Press

Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota were rich hunting grounds for a young man in the early part of the 20th century. He wasn’t hunting game. He was in search of lumberjack songs.

There are a few basic steps journalists take when reporting. Pick a newsworthy topic. Track down the facts. And then talk to people out in the community what they think about it.

But what if you flipped that script?

Courtesy of Safia Hattab

Hope College is a small, private liberal arts college near Holland, in West Michigan.

It was founded in 1862 in partnership with the Reformed Church in America, so its Christian identity is central.

Safia Hattab, a freshman at Hope studying English and computer science, brings a different perspective to the school of over 3,300 students: she’s Muslim. Hattab turned her experience of being Muslim in West Michigan into an award-winning essay titled “Through the Dome.”

Stateside 4.3.2018

Apr 3, 2018

Today on Stateside, we learn nearly 20% of Michigan third-graders have been subject of maltreatment investigations. And, we discuss a state project aiming to combat the rising suicide rate in men.

The Bootstrap Boys

  

John Sinkevics, editor and publisher of LocalSpins.com, joined Stateside today to bring us the latest from West Michigan’s music scene.

This month he brings us music from two Grand Rapids bands — The Crane Wives and The Bootstrap Boys — that submitted videos to NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest. He also discusses the new release from Grand Rapids based group Chain of Lakes.

Students in a school auditorium
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Some teachers at Orchard View High School in Muskegon say that the media paints their city as a place riddled with gun violence, bad public schools, and poverty. So they wanted to find a way to help their students see and take part in something positive in their community.

The teachers and school administration are looking to poetry to do that.

As the final school bell of the day just rang at Orchard View High School recently, some students made their way through hallways covered in artwork from current and former students.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

A unique collection of Inuit art is being given to the University of Michigan Museum of Art. More than 200 stone sculptures and prints from the Inuit people on Baffin Island in Canada, just west of Greenland. The collection is valued at $2.5 million. There are additional funds to endow an Inuit art program. These gifts from from Phil and Kathy Power.

The story behind the collection is as interesting as the art itself. Phil Power gave Lester Graham a tour of the collection in this extended version of the interview.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Tammy Coxen was coughing.

“I did a really stupid thing,” she said, explaining, “I told my friends, ‘It’s been great; I haven’t gotten sick all year.’ Now, I have a cold.”

There’s a drink for that. Well, there wasn’t, but Coxen, of Tammy’s Tastings, came up with one.

“This is Tammy’s Cure-All,” she said between coughs.

Her inspiration was trying to put all the things people say are good for fighting a cold: orange juice, ginger, lemon juice, and honey.

A black and white photo of Rabindranath Tagore
Wikimedia Commons - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

As controversy swirled around Bob Dylan's 2017 Nobel prize for literature, some argued that Dylan wasn't even the first songwriter to win the prize. That honor may belong to Indian songwriter, poet and philosopher Rabindranath Tagore.  

Stateside 3.28.2018

Mar 28, 2018

Today on Stateside, a reporter describes why he thinks Karen Spranger's time in office will go down in history as the "most bizarre" era for Macomb County politics. And, we learn about a Michigan woodworking company "reclaiming trees and lives" with an ex-felon mentorship program.

Casa de Rosado / Facebook

Turning shame into pride.

That’s the idea behind an exhibit of black velvet paintings. It’s called “Black Velvet: A Rasquache Aesthetic,” and it’s happening at the Latino Cultural Center in Detroit's Mexicantown.

Stateside 3.27.2018

Mar 27, 2018

Today on Stateside, we learn what you need to know about the arrest of Larry Nassar's former boss, and what it means for Michigan State University. Also today, we discuss an eclectic mix of shows from theaters across Michigan and take a listen to new music from Detroit-area artists.

Michigander

Each month, we take a listen to new music from Detroit-area artists.

This time, the theme is spring, a great time to look at new music from Michigander, Baron Crook’s Tangle Parade, and Max Landry.

Harvard Square Editions, 2018

When Michigan’s economy tanked a decade ago, it stepped up a steady stream of young people leaving Michigan to seek work in Chicago.

Michael Ferro was one of those young Michiganders. His experience working for the federal government in the Windy City was the inspiration for his debut novel Title 13.

Wikimedia Commons / Van Vechten Collection at Library of Congress

 

 

This time, David Kiley of Encore Michigan brings us an eclectic mix of shows from theaters across Michigan.

 

Listen above to hear Kiley’s previews of the following shows:

We use contractions such as "can't" or "shouldn't" all the time in our writing. There are a few though that we use in speech but probably wouldn't write down.

For example, if you read that last paragraph out loud, do you actually say "there are" or do you squish the words together as a contraction -- "there're"?

Here's another question: Would you ever use "there're" in writing? Probably not, but many of us wouldn't have a problem using contractions like "can't" and "won't.  

So why do some contractions get a pass but not others?


Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

We travel the state every once in a while for our Artisans of Michigan series, and this time we went to Flint.

C.H. Schultz & Sons has been repairing upholstery in cars nearly as long as cars have been around. Back in 1917, more than 100 years ago, Clyde H. Schultz was working at Buick and in the garage behind his house. A family business was born. Deborah Schultz-Pawloski is the third generation.

And all that car history is inspiration for her.

Stateside 3.22.2018

Mar 22, 2018

Today on Stateside, a Corktown resident says he hopes the "little man" isn't forgotten as Ford eyes Michigan Central Station. Also today, state schools chief Brian Whiston says, "it takes time to make reform work." And, we hear from the East Lansing native who's fashion line geared toward Muslim women is now on racks at Macy's.

Mercedes Mejia/Michigan Radio

It’s been a momentous couple of years for Jason Singer, who goes by the stage name Michigander.  

Courtesy of Lisa Vogl / Verona

Macy's has rolled out a new fashion line called Verona.

It’s aimed at Muslim women who want Western-style clothing and hijabs, or headscarves. Founder of the Verona Collection is Lisa Vogl, a fashion photographer who grew up in East Lansing. She converted to Islam in 2011.

Carl Wilson linoart print
Carl Wilson

It's funny how the smallest details about someone we love can stay with us.

For example: a scent. Any whiff of Shalimar instantly makes host Cynthia Canty think of her great-Aunt Verne because it was her signature perfume.

For artist Carl Wilson, it's the memory of the chewing gum his mother always had in her purse — and that led to the title for his first solo museum exhibition.

Tiffany Brown with two other women
Courtesy of Tiffany Brown

There’s so much renovation and new development happening in Detroit. But how many of the people designing these spaces are the people who will end up using them?

That’s the question that drives Tiffany Brown.

She is an architectural designer who won a 2017 Knight Arts Challenge grant for her idea to bring more black girls and women into the field of architecture and urban planning. Her winning project is called 400 Forward.

When was the last time you asked for a rain check? 

Maybe a store gave you a rain check for a product you wanted that was out of stock. Or maybe you invited a friend out to lunch, but they were busy and asked for a rain check.

If you've ever asked for a rain check, you're actually using a phrase that we can trace back to baseball and, surprisingly, chess.


Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Swilling and spilling green beer is part of the Saint Patrick’s Day tradition for some folks. There is an alternative if you prefer something other than a cheap lager with green dye. It’s a cocktail named the Tipperary after the town and county in Ireland.

“It does have one green ingredient in it,” Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings quipped, adding “…the drink itself is not green.”

NSA

Hazel Forrest died last week at the age of 106.

According to The Chronicle Herald out of Nova Scotia, she was one of the last known survivors of the Halifax Explosion, which occurred when two ships, one loaded TNT and other explosives, collided in Halifax Harbour in 1917. It was the biggest man-made blast prior to the atomic bomb. 

Some 2,000 people were killed and many thousands more were injured. Yet, this cataclysmic event is largely forgotten, at least on the U.S. side of our border with Canada.

Classically trained in vocal performance at the University of Michigan’s School of Music, Theatre & Dance, Holden Madagame was a mezzo soprano. 

But today, he sings professionally as a tenor.

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