august primary | Michigan Radio
WUOMFM

august primary

hand holding I VOTED sticker
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Michiganders flocked to the polls Tuesday in numbers that haven’t been matched in recent decades.

ballot
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Now that the primary elections have shaken out the winners and the losers, the victorious candidates are turning their attention to the November general election.

Which means it's already time to talk strategies, campaign messages, and running mates.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

On Tuesday, voters in Genesee County will decide whether tax dollars should help fund the Flint Cultural Center and other arts organizations.

The proposed millage would generate close to $9 million a year. Most of it would go to the crowns of Flint’s cultural institutions, including the Flint Institute of Arts, the Whiting Auditorium and the Sloan museum.

Museum executive director Todd Slisher says a declining donor base is creating a problem for the institutions that traditionally relied on private support.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

For the second time, voters in East Lansing are being asked to approve a city income tax.

The proposal on Tuesday’s ballot would create a one percent income tax for East Lansing residents and half a percent for non-residents who work in the city.

Gary Beaudoin is a spokesman for the YES campaign.   He says the money generated from the income tax will help East Lansing address its legacy labor costs and other issues.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Jackson County voters are being warned they could lose some of their county parks, unless voters OK a new millage on August 7th.  

Jackson County maintains 17 parks and a ten-mile-long scenic bike trail.   

But county Parks Director Jeff Hovarter says past budget cuts have reduced needed maintenance.

He says, without the $2 million a year the millage on the August ballot would provide, the alternative is “rightsizing our park system.”  Hovarter says that may involve closing some parks, selling others to developers or transferring parks to townships.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

New campaign finance reports suggest this year’s governor’s race may end up being the most expensive in Michigan history.

The August primary will select the Democratic, Republican and Libertarian party nominees for governor. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

With just two weeks left before the August 7 primary, a top contender for the Republican nomination for governor is under fire over how often he shows up for the job he has now.

“On duty” is how Bill Schuette often refers to his tenure as Michigan attorney general.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Democrats running for governor were busy today walking in parades, handing out candy to children, while talking to their parents about voting in next month’s primary.

With one month to go in the campaign before the August primary, candidate Gretchen Whitmer says it’s “all hands on deck.”

“We’re on the doors. We’re on the phones. I’m attending events across Michigan at senior centers or parades,” Whitmer said as she waited for the start of Wyandotte’s 4th of July parade, her second parade of the morning. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Supporters of a new plan to bring single-payer health care to Michigan rallied at the state Capitol Monday.  

The legislative proposal promises to cut health care costs by twelve to twenty percent. The plan calls for paying Michigan’s health care bill with a mix of progressive income and business taxes, along with federal funds.

straight-party voting
Lars Plougmann

Just 1 in 5 Michigan voters cast a ballot Tuesday. While that doesn’t sound like a lot, it’s actually close to a record high turnout for this kind of primary.

“There were a number of highly-contested congressional primaries across the state, so that helped drive interest,” says Fred Woodhams, spokesperson from the Michigan Secretary of State’s office.

Lessenberry breaks down Michigan primary results

Aug 3, 2016
Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Doug Tribou look at Michigan primary results, including Congressman John Conyers' closest challenge in years, an upset in the state's 1st congressional district and what drives voters to support or reject millages. Lessenberry and Tribou also discuss yesterday's turnout and whether an August primary is the best strategy to boost voter participation in non-presidential primaries.


A photo of Paul Mitchell from his campaign website.
http://paulmitchellforcongress.com/meet-paul/

Businessman Paul Mitchell won the Republican primary in Michigan’s thumb – that’s the 10th Congressional District.

Mitchell, who lives in Dryden, loaned his campaign a LOT of money: more than $2.5 million in loans, plus straight up giving the campaign another half million.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s less than two weeks before Flint’s primary for mayor. 

Today, another candidate jumped in the race. 

City councilwoman Monica Galloway was elected to the city council two years ago. Now she’s seeking the city’s top elected job.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s four mayoral candidates swapped ideas, personal stories and a few jabs at a candidate forum last night.

Much of evening focused on Flint’s problem-plagued water system and the recently ended state oversight. 

The week in Michigan politics

Jul 30, 2014
Detroit skyline.
user JSFauxtaugraphy / Flickr

This Week in Michigan Politics, Emily Fox and Jack Lessenberry discuss what races and issues to follow before next week's primary election, how Detroit's emergency manager has shifted responsibilities of the city's water department to Mayor Mike Duggan after controversies for water shut offs, and recent developments with the new international bridge from Detroit to Windsor, ON.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Mid-Michigan congressman Dave Camp’s decision to step down from the seat he’s held for two decades sparked a battle between different factions of the Republican Party.

Next Tuesday, voters will likely decide which one will hold the seat.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Republican Congressman Mike Rogers’ decision to retire from his 8th congressional district seat is leaving a void that Michigan Democrats hope to fill.

The 8th congressional district stretches over parts of Oakland, Livingston, Ingham, Shiawassee and Clinton counties.   And since 2001, Mike Rogers has kept it safely in the Republican column.