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Detroit Medical Center

On the Kalamazoo River just downstream from the confluence of Talmadge Creek. Around 1 million gallons of tar sands oil spilled into the river in 2010.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

A new study says Michigan's economy would take a big hit if there was an oil spill in the Mackinac Straits. A Michigan State University professor estimates a spill could cost the state's economy more than $6 billion. Enbridge Energy says the study is "flawed" and based on "unrealistic estimates." This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the study's potential impact.

DMC, Wayne State split after contract negotiations sour

May 3, 2018
 Detroit Medical Center, Harper Hospital and Hutzel Woman's Hospital.
user Parkerdr / Wikimedia Commons

Detroit Medical Center has abruptly terminated its partnership with Wayne State University School of Medicine, citing what it called Wayne State's “acrimonious” and “transactional” approach to ongoing contract negotiations.

 

The relationship between WSUSOM and the DMC hospitals co-located with its campus dates back about a hundred years. Conflicts have flared up over the years around contract negotiations and other issues.

Tenet-DMC Charity Care Report / Michigan Nurses Association

A new report says the Detroit Medical System’s for-profit owner has broken its promise to care for the city’s poorest residents.

The DMC is owned by Dallas-based Tenet Health Care. Tenet pledged to continue the DMC’s historic commitment to “charity care” when it bought the hospital system in 2013.

But the Michigan Nurses Association report says federal government data show DMC charity care spending plunged 98% in three years, from nearly $23 million in 2013 to around $470,000 in 2016.

Detroit Medical Center / Detroit Medical Center

The Detroit Medical Center is still trying to reach a new contract with some unionized workers at its five Detroit hospitals, after service and maintenance workers overwhelmingly rejected a tentative contract agreement earlier this month.

Those workers, who range from janitorial staff to equipment technicians, say the first deal offered by the DMC’s for-profit owner, Tenet Health Care, was simply “inadequate.”

 Detroit Medical Center, Harper Hospital and Hutzel Woman's Hospital.
user Parkerdr / Wikimedia Commons

The Detroit Medical Center says a breach of health information affects more than 1,500 patients seen at one of its facilities in 2015 and 2016.

The health system announced Thursday that a staffing agency contracted by the DMC notified hospital officials that one of the agency's employees provided the information to unauthorized people who weren't affiliated with the DMC organization.

The DMC says letters were sent to 1,529 patients notifying them of the breach, which happened between March 2015 and May 2016.

DMC says surgical instrument problems corrected

May 12, 2017
surgical instruments
AmazonCARES / Flickr Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Detroit Medical Center officials say its problems with unclean surgical instruments are now fixed.

According to Dr. Tony Tedeschi, DMC's chief executive officer, the DMC has made substantial changes to improve its sterilization, inspection, reporting, and training systems.

"The processes that we have in place certainly ensure that no instruments that weren't completely sterile and safe would ever reach a patient," said Tedeschi.

Surgery tools
Stanford EdTech / Flickr, http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Officials say the Detroit Medical Center has spent $1.2 million since September to correct problems with dirty surgical instruments and has put multiple systems in place to ensure patient safety.

The Detroit News reports that the update follows recent revelations that a third hospital in the health system - Children's Hospital of Michigan - failed a January inspection.

Surgeon-in-Chief Joseph Lelli Jr. says he wants to reassure parents that their children are safe at the hospital.

Surgical instruments.
Windell Oskay / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

DETROIT - Detroit Medical Center says the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has approved its plan to address problems with its sterilization of surgical instruments. The medical center announced Tuesday the plan includes the formation of a surgical improvement council and task force to oversee instrument sterilization. It says the plan also addresses better policies and procedures for cleaning, processing and sterilization of instruments and enhanced training and monitoring.

Michigan's Bureau of Community and Health Systems has launched an investigation into dirty, broken, and missing instruments at Detroit Medical Center hospitals.

The investigation was prompted by a report in the Detroit News showing a pattern of improper cleaning and sterilization at DMC facilities,  putting patients at risk for over eleven years.

 Detroit Medical Center, Harper Hospital and Hutzel Woman's Hospital.
user Parkerdr / Wikimedia Commons

A settlement between the Detroit Medical Center and more than 20,000 nurses is almost a done deal.

Detroit federal judge Gerald Rosen gave the agreement preliminary approval Monday. If given final approval, it will end a nine-year-old antitrust case against all of southeast Michigan’s major hospitals.

There’s an effort underway to make sure kids who usually get breakfast at school don’t go hungry in the summer months.

This is the fifth year that nurses at the Detroit Medical Center’s Children’s Hospital have taken up a cereal drive for those at-risk kids.

The drive was the brainchild of Pam Taurence and her colleagues on the Professional Nurse Council.

Taurence says it started in 2010, when the group was trying to come up with an idea for a community service project.

DetroitMI.gov

Detroit has become a poster child for the struggling Rust Belt city, and its struggles affect both Southeast Michigan  and the entire state.

This is why the possible mayoral candidacy of Mike Duggan is going to be closely watched.

Duggan—former aide to Wayne County Executive Edward McNamara, former Wayne County prosecutor, and now CEO of the Detroit Medical Center (DMC)—has filed the paperwork needed to set up a campaign committee for a possible run to become the next Mayor of Detroit.

DetroitMI.gov

Detroit Medical Center chief Mike Duggan has all-but-officially thrown his hat into the Detroit mayor’s race.

Duggan filed papers Wednesday to create a campaign committee to raise money while he explores that possibility.

"I've never seen things this bad," Duggan said in a statement explaining his run. "This month we had 32 murders in 15 days, the city's plan to replace streetlights collapsed in Lansing, and the city just ran up another $40 million deficit in the last quarter despite the consent agreement.

photo from David Kwaitkowski's Facebook page

Michigan health officials say a hospital worker who allegedly spread Hepatitis-C to patients at a hospital in New Hampshire also worked at several facilities in Michigan.

They suggest former patients at those Michigan hospitals may want to get tested for Hepatitis-C.

Detroit is the site of an important medical discovery that’s expected to reduce infant mortality.

Doctors at the Detroit Medical Center, Wayne State University, and the National Institutes of Health identified women likely to deliver their babies early with a simple hormone gel. They treated those women with a hormone gel and reduced the chance of premature delivery by 45 percent. Mike Duggan is the President of the Detroit Medical Center.

"The idea that you could spot a likelihood of that premature delivery and prevent it in really remarkable numbers it is a world changing discovery. This is going to change the infant mortality rate."

Doctor Tom Malone is the head of DMC’s Hutzel Women’s Hospital.

"Prematurity and small for gestational age probably impacts infant mortality more than anything else, and the infant mortality rate in the city of Detroit is the highest in the state. So you get an idea of how significant this study is."

Over 500,000  babies are born early each year in the United States. Prematurity is the leading cause of infant mortality.