WUOMFM

disabilities

A camp for disabled kids held a dodgeball tournament Wednesday at Grand Valley State University.

A simple game of dodgeball can make a big difference for some kids. Unlike most dodgeball games at summer camps across the country, everyone playing in this game was in a wheelchair.

About 48 kids participated in the annual tournament, but friendship and support is what the camp is really all about.

unclelkt / pixabay

As Michigan’s population ages, the state’s new budget will fund a study looking at better ways to pay for and run long-term care systems.

Three adults seated. One holding a small dog.
Lauren Talley / Michigan Radio

There are more than 4.5 million adults in the U.S. with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Most live with their families and a survey by the advocacy group the ARC, found that more than two-thirds of those families don't have a long-term plan for care.

Finding housing is a huge challenge, so some families in Saline are creating a neighborhood of their own.

Cadence is a member of the Warrior Transition Brigade Service Dog Training Program.
User Ash Carter / Flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Telling your landlord that the family pet is an “emotional support animal” – when it isn’t—could land you in jail. That’s if a bill introduced recently in the state Senate passes.

Emotional support animals are used to alleviate symptoms of disorders like anxiety or depression. (They are not the same as service dogs, who are trained to perform a specific task like opening a door or picking up the phone.)

Screengrab / YouTube

Learning disabilities are often invisible to everyone but the people who have them.

Eventually, though, the secret gets out. When that happens, it can be an incredibly emotional experience.

Capitol Building in Lansing, MI
Matthileo / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A new state law bans the use of restraint or isolation to discipline students.

  

The law was recommended by a task force looking at reforms in special education. Students with physical or developmental disabilities are more likely to face the use of restraint or seclusion.

  

Advocates for special education students say harsh disciplinary measures have been used by teachers and administrators who did not know how to handle students with disabilities. Calley says the new law shows times are changing.