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Donald Trump

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Thousands came out to what President-elect Donald Trumped dubbed his victory tour Friday night. He thanked voters for flipping Michigan for a Republican president for the first time in decades.

Trump covered a lot of ground, speaking for about an hour to a packed Deltaplex in Grand Rapids.

He promised to repeal Obamacare and bring factory jobs back to Michigan.

The biggest round of applause came after Trump promised to use “extreme vetting” of refugees and immigrants from certain countries.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It was Theodore Roosevelt who declared the Presidency was a "bully pulpit." Our incoming 45th President clearly agrees.

Donald Trump doesn't take the oath of office for 49 days, but he's already used his favorite tool, Twitter, to send some crystal clear messages to businesses and unions.

Rick Pluta / MPRN

We followed the twists, turns, and drama surrounding Michigan's presidential recount. Green Party candidate Jill Stein requested the recount in Michigan (and in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania) after stories circulated about the need for a robust auditing system of elections in the U.S. (Read more about that here.)

The largest vote recount in Michigan’s history has been ordered to begin this afternoon at noon.

Very early this morning, federal judge Mark Goldsmith ordered the state to, “cease any delay in the commencement of the recount of the presidential vote cast in Michigan as of noon…”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

It looks like the ballot recount in Michigan will move forward, unless the courts decide to get involved. This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about the recount as well as a state bill that would tighten up voter ID laws and another that would ban plastic bag bans.


Michael Dorausch / Flickr, http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today, the Board of State Canvassers deadlocked on President-elect Donald Trump’s request to stop a recount of votes in this state.

Two Republicans on the board voted today to prevent the recount, while two Democrats said it should proceed.

The state chair of the Republican Party, Ronna Romney McDaniel said the party expected this result.

A state spokesman announced the recount will begin Tuesday or Wednesday, barring a court order.

Courtesy of Amer Zahr

 

The election of Donald Trump worries a lot of people.

Some women, immigrants, and Muslims are wondering if Trump’s presidency will be anything like his campaign rallies, and what that might mean for their lives.

Screen shot of Breitbart.com on November 29, 2016.
screen grab

Update: December 1, 2016:

LOS ANGELES - Breitbart is encouraging a boycott of Kellogg's products after the cereal maker said it would no longer advertise on the news and opinion website, formerly run by President-elect Donald Trump aide Steve Bannon.

The Kellogg Company cited company "values" in explaining its decision; a spokeswoman said Thursday it has "nothing to do with politics."

Breitbart has been condemned for featuring racist, sexist and anti-Semitic content.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report finds, despite improved access to health insurance, a large number of poor Michiganders still fall in and out of coverage.

The University of Michigan’s Center for Healthcare Research & Transformation looked at something called “churning”.  Churning is when individuals pass from one health insurer to another, either by changing plans or entering and exiting Medicaid.

Marianne Udow Philips is the center’s director. She says there remains a lot of health insurance instability.

L. Brooks Patterson defended James Simpson's invitation, saying Simpson was asked to speak specifically because he's provocative.
screen grab of Oakland Co. video

 


According to its website, the Oakland County Business Roundtable began in 1993 as a space for business leaders to “engage” with county leaders on “issues that will enable them to prosper.”

For next month’s lunch meeting, County Executive L. Brooks Patterson has invited writer James Simpson to be the keynote speaker.

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

The Green Party is expected to file paperwork to formally request a recount of the presidential election votes in Michigan. This Week in Michigan Politics, senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talks with Morning Edition host Doug Tribou about why he's already confident the results are correct.

They also discuss President-elect Donald Trump's choice of Betsy DeVos as his Secretary of Education, Congressman Sander Levin's decision not to seek re-election as leader of the Ways and Means Committee, and the transition of the Detroit Promise scholarship from a two year to a four year program.


Cheyna Roth / MPRN

The estimated cost of recounting all the votes in Michigan’s presidential election continues to rise. State officials plan to charge Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein almost $1 million to conduct the recount. But Secretary of State Ruth Johnson guessed as much as $2 million.  Republican Party attorney Eric Doster thinks it will be closer to the $10 million cost of running a statewide election.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons -- http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Donald Trump has selected five people for his cabinet. His most recent choice is Republican Rep. Tom Price, R-GA, as Secretary of Health and Human Services. 

Though Price has served as Georgia's 6th District congressman since 2004, most of his childhood and young adulthood was spent in Michigan. 

Price was born in Lansing, Michigan and graduated from Dearborn High School, according to Congress' Biographical Directory. He also pursued post-secondary education in Michigan.

As you may have heard, Jill Stein, the Green Party presidential candidate, is asking for a recount of the vote in the three key states that decided the election – Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and our own state of Michigan, which was the closest of all.

The Clinton campaign, or whatever remains of it, doesn’t hold out any real hope that the outcome will change, but supports the recounts, on the ground the public ought to be assured of the integrity of the process. 


user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Republican Donald Trump is officially the winner of the presidential race in Michigan. A state elections board certified the results today, but now a recount looms.

This afternoon, the Michigan Board of State Canvassers will, in all likelihood, certify the results of the November 8th election - bringing Campaign 2016 to an official close and opening the door to Recount 2016.

Unprecedented

Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania are about to become the center of the U.S. political universe as the Green Party and its presidential candidate, Dr. Jill Stein, try to upset the order of things and make elections officials in those three states go back and check their work.

President Donald Trump
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

President-elect Donald Trump is condemning the push to force recounts in three states pivotal to his Nov. 8 victory.

In a statement released by his transition team, Trump called the developing recount effort "a scam."

He says, "The people have spoken and the election is over."

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

If you've ever driven down a pot-hole strewn road, or needed  a filter just to drink your tap water in Flint, you know just how crappy parts of Michigan's infrastructure are right now. 

Now a special commission is expected to deliver a report to the governor next week, outlining what needs to be done to address the state's growing infrastructure needs.

According to the Michigan Campaign Finance Network, the DeVos family has given roughly $14 million to political campaigns and causes over the last two years.
BetsyDeVos.com

President-elect Donald Trump has selected longtime school choice advocate Betsy DeVos to head the U.S. Department of Education. (Presidential cabinet picks are subject to Senate confirmation. See who Trump has picked for his cabinet so far with WaPo's cabinet tracker.)

Trump’s stance on education policy has, thus far, been difficult to discern. His pick of DeVos indicates how his administration likely sees education policy going forward.

Gov. Rick Snyder.
Courtesy Detroit Regional Chamber / Creative Commons -- http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder declined to endorse Donald Trump during the election. (He didn't endorse any candidate for president, according to our It's Just Politics ​team.)

And the Associated Press reported that Gov. Snyder referred to Trump's comments about women as "revolting and disgusting."

The DeYoung Power Plant in Holland.
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

This year is likely to be the hottest on record. Scientists with the World Meteorological Organization announced that recently, as world leaders met in Morocco to talk about limiting the impacts of climate change.

President-elect Donald Trump has called climate change a hoax, and he’s said he’ll withdraw from the Paris climate agreement.

Andy Hoffman is a professor with the Ross School of Business and education director for the Graham Sustainability Institute at the University of Michigan.

He says we don’t really know what the president-elect’s climate policy will look like.

Senator Jeff Sessions speaking at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, DC in 2011.
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Some Detroit leaders, clergy, and activists spoke out against Donald Trump’s pick for U.S. Attorney General on Monday, denouncing him as someone who would “take us back to the Jim Crow era.”

They said Senator Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, has a particularly bad history when it comes to African-American voting rights, and other civil rights issues.

But Rev. Paul Perez, with the Detroit conference of the United Methodist Church, says that’s not the only area of concern.

wikimedia user McZusatz / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

As President-elect Trump and his team prepare for inauguration in two months, Michigan is preparing for President-elect Trump.

And Trump has outlined a number of things he'd like to do with regard to trade in his first 100 days in office.

http://www.sessions.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/official-photo

Activist groups are protesting Donald Trump's pick for Attorney General in Detroit on Monday.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Business leaders are coming to terms with the brave new Trumpworld and the hometown automakers think they may have a new ally in the White House.

Ford Motor CEO Mark Fields says the automaker’s brass is in “constant communication” with President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team.

Liesl Clark said Michigan is taking more older, coal-fired power plants offline because they are uneconomical to run.
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Energy policy will change under the new administration and state policies in places such as Michigan are more likely to look like Trump policies than Obama polices. That's the opinion of Mark A. Barteau, the director of the University of Michigan Energy Institute.

Trump has made clear statements that he believes climate change is a hoax and he plans to dismantle the Obama administration’s energy policies. This will affect gas and oil production. Trump has also said he’ll bring “clean coal” production back, but it's not certain there is market demand.

Auchter's Art: No one wants to be a sucker

Nov 18, 2016
AUCHTOON.COM

Here's a theory that might help to unify us in these difficult times: What all Americans really, really hate is to be a sucker.

Whatever else we disagree on — politics, ideology, economics, dessert toppings, the truth — a common bond is that nobody likes being a sucker.

I think that had an enormous effect on getting Trump elected.

Consider this:

Man allegedly yells 'Trump' during attack on cab driver

Nov 17, 2016
Grand Rapids
Steven Depolo / Flickr

A cab driver of East African descent has been beaten in western Michigan by a man who allegedly yelled "Trump" during the attack.
 

Grand Rapids police say Thursday that the man was arrested after the Saturday morning attack and later made discriminatory comments about the cab driver's race.

It was not clear if the man has been charged.

Reports of violence and threats toward ethnic minorities have increased since Republican Donald Trump was elected president last week.

Bill Ford at Web Summit 2015 in Dublin, Ireland
flickr user Web Summit / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

In a little over two months, Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes is digging into what that could mean for our auto industry.

“The biggest fear is that we would go backwards into fear rather than forward into hope. That we’d go backwards into polarization, not forward into unity. We’ve made an awful lot of progress in the last 50 years, and that progress is now threatened.”
Laura Weber / MPRN

 

A week ago, we woke up to the news that Donald Trump is our president-elect.

Since that day, we’ve seen a flood of reported hate incidents across the country.

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