Election 2016 | Michigan Radio
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Election 2016

Here you'll find the latest election coverage from Michigan Radio. Scroll below for information and stories. 

Protesters chalked anti-hate messages outside Royal Oak Middle School, after reported incidents of race-based bullying there.
Alexis Gentile / via Facebook

Some school leaders and parents are wrestling with how to respond to hateful incidents in the wake of Donald Trump’s election.

There have been a number of such incidents reported in schools across Michigan since election day.

One happened at Royal Oak Middle School the day after the election, when a  group of students chanted “build the wall” in the cafeteria — an apparent reference to Trump’s pledge to build a wall across the Mexican border.

Alicia Ramon is the mother of the seventh-grade girl who took a video of that incident, which has since gone viral.

Here’s the story I’m worried about hearing this weekend: An angry Clinton supporter carving a turkey plunges the knife not into the white meat, but his Trump-supporting uncle.

That’s not as far- fetched as it sounds. Inability to cope with what happened November 8th has meant lots of extra work for grief counselors, therapists, and the like.


http://www.sessions.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/official-photo

Activist groups are protesting Donald Trump's pick for Attorney General in Detroit on Monday.

"I feel like everything has become partisan nowadays," Demas told us.
flickr user Forsaken Fotos / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Across America, reports of politically related harassment have soared in the wake of the presidential election.

To list a few incidents that have happened in Michigan:

There are more. Too many more.

Susan Demas joined us today to talk about how the post-election bullying has impacted her family.

Liesl Clark said Michigan is taking more older, coal-fired power plants offline because they are uneconomical to run.
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Energy policy will change under the new administration and state policies in places such as Michigan are more likely to look like Trump policies than Obama polices. That's the opinion of Mark A. Barteau, the director of the University of Michigan Energy Institute.

Trump has made clear statements that he believes climate change is a hoax and he plans to dismantle the Obama administration’s energy policies. This will affect gas and oil production. Trump has also said he’ll bring “clean coal” production back, but it's not certain there is market demand.

Auchter's Art: No one wants to be a sucker

Nov 18, 2016
AUCHTOON.COM

Here's a theory that might help to unify us in these difficult times: What all Americans really, really hate is to be a sucker.

Whatever else we disagree on — politics, ideology, economics, dessert toppings, the truth — a common bond is that nobody likes being a sucker.

I think that had an enormous effect on getting Trump elected.

Consider this:

“The biggest fear is that we would go backwards into fear rather than forward into hope. That we’d go backwards into polarization, not forward into unity. We’ve made an awful lot of progress in the last 50 years, and that progress is now threatened.”
Laura Weber / MPRN

 

A week ago, we woke up to the news that Donald Trump is our president-elect.

Since that day, we’ve seen a flood of reported hate incidents across the country.

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

Election 2016 triggered anti-Trump protests and vigils across the country, including some on college campuses in Michigan.

For This Week in Michigan Politics, Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss how schools should handle that conversation and the responsibilities of community leaders in places where post-election threats and bullying have occurred.

They also discuss Gov. Rick Snyder's trip to China and his priorities as he heads into the final two years of his term.


Courtesy Photo

For the first time in 28 years a majority of Michigan voters chose a Republican president.

Although low voter turnout in big, democratic strongholds like Flint and Detroit played a role, exit polling shows rural voters turned out in record numbers to flip Michigan for Trump.

With the first female presidential candidate on the ballot this election, it was widely expected women would turnout in large numbers for Hillary Clinton. Most did. But exit polls still show 42% of women backed Trump. White, non-college educated women voted for Trump 2 to 1.

Civil rights groups and clergy gathered at Detroit's Central United Methodist Church on Monday.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Civil rights groups and faith leaders say they stand ready to oppose some of Donald Trump’s expected policies.

They displayed a united front and laid out plans for action in Detroit on Monday.

The plans range from rounding up attorneys and other volunteers to defend families facing deportation, to clergy pledging “sanctuary” for them.

Sergio Martinez, an undocumented immigrant living in Detroit, says his community is “scared to death” right now.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

There’s no better way to understand what lies ahead than to take a look at our history.

Gleaves Whitney sat down with us today to talk about what history might tell us about Donald Trump’s Election Day victory and the turmoil and division that’s been left in the wake of this long, tough campaign.

Courtesy of Dawud Walid

In the past week, middle school students in Royal Oak chanted “Build the Wall,” a Canton police officer was suspended over a racist Facebook post, and a University of Michigan student reported she was confronted by a man who threatened to set her on fire if she didn’t remove her hijab.

These are just some of the incidents reported since last week’s election of Donald Trump, which came after a long campaign that often focused on Muslims.

I have been a staunch defender of the Electoral College, that quaint mechanism left over from the early days of the republic. You may well know how it works, though many people don’t.

When you voted for president last week, you in fact voted not for a candidate, but for a slate of sixteen people who pledge to vote for that candidate. The winning electors will drive to Lansing on December 19 and cast their votes in longhand as they would have done in 1792.


After Tuesday’s historic election, Republicans will continue their firm control of Lansing.

Going into last week, predictions, even among Republicans, were that the GOP would lose at least some seats in the state House of Representatives. There were times, in fact, during the campaign, that some even wondered whether Democrats might take control of the House.

Graph showing racial attacks and harassment since Election Day.
Souther Poverty Law Center

The Michigan Department of Civil Rights continues to receive increased reports of harassment and bullying directed at students of color and religious minorities following Tuesday's election.

Agustin Arbulu is the director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights. He says many of the attacks are related to things President-elect Donald Trump said throughout his campaign.

“I think this election had a very negative climate for people on both sides, so it’s not surprising that there are people struggling with the result,” he says.

Protesters also chalked anti-hate messages outside Royal Oak Middle School.
Alexis Gentile / via Facebook

Protesters have taken to streets across the country to express their displeasure with President-elect Donald Trump.

That includes some who gathered to speak out and march in Metro Detroit last night.

In Royal Oak, the group gathered outside Oakland Community College was fairly small, but they did draw lots of supportive honks.

Some shared their anger over Trump’s election—and their determination to resist his policies.

Others spoke about fear of harassment and physical attacks against Muslims, immigrants and other targets of Trump’s rhetoric.

Week in Review: Sifting through Election 2016

Nov 12, 2016
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

In this Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the results of Election 2016, now that the dust has had time to settle.


president trump
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Time for another look at the week in politics with Ken Sikkema and Susan Demas.

There have been protests against the election of Donald Trump around Michigan and across the nation.

Many Republicans see these protesters as little more than sore losers throwing a fit.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Pundits and pollsters are trying to figure out how they miscalled the presidential race. So many were nearly certain Hillary Clinton would win.

In a Washington Post opinion piece Member of Congress Debbie Dingell, a Democrat, says she knew Clinton was in trouble. She said so at the time. Her fellow Democrats didn’t listen.

Jeremy Sorrells / Flickr, http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The 2016 presidential election was one of the tightest in history, and nowhere is that more apparent than in Michigan.

According to the Michigan Secretary of State, Donald Trump won the state by only 13,107 votes. That’s a tiny .27 percent margin, the closest in state history.

When was the last time a race was so close in Michigan? Way back in 1940.  

AUCHTOON.COM

Earlier this week I was pulling into work when a replay of a Renee Montagne interview with the great Mel Brooks came up on Michigan Radio.

I took the the opportunity to sit in the car and listen to the entire thing. It was good timing all around. Like always, he made me laugh out loud, but he also gave me some perspective.

Flickr user rgmcfadden / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Donald Trump’s victory sent people to their favorite social media platform to express their thoughts, fears and hopes as our divided nation tries to figure out what’s next.

A Facebook post from Michigan filmmaker Amy Weber asked each side to open up to the other.

“We will brush off our bruised hearts and open our arms to LOVE for ALL people and join together, because we MUST. Let’s use our powerful voices to educate and break down the walls that divide us.”

Weber is a lesbian mother and she said when Donald Trump was elected, she felt afraid.

United States Department of Education / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Little kids have a lot of questions about the election right now. And for parents, those conversations can be painful. Or comforting. Or sometimes, just hard to navigate.

Kids learning through the election that "there are dishonest people" 

Bill Pickens is an organic farmer from Dundee who used to be an engineer. He says he and his wife have four kids under the age of 8 right now. They lost their fifth child to SIDS last year, and now, they’re pregnant again.  

Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs (left) and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems
Photos courtesy of T.J. Bucholz and Matt Marsden

America needs some healing.

The long, hard, bitter campaign left deep divisions and many are wondering what it will take to bring us together as Americans -- to give us a sense of being on the same team.

Is that even possible in 2016?

To make sense of it all, Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems joined Stateside to break it all down.

Trump rally in Newtown, Pennsylvania.
user Michael Candelori / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

“The Rust Belt revenge.”

That’s how Detroit News Business columnist Daniel Howes views the Election Day surprise that put Donald Trump in the White House and secured both Houses of Congress for the Republican Party.

In Howes’ view, the Rust Belt vote came together as a many-throated cry of “Listen to us!”

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

As president of the College Republicans at the University of Michigan, Enrique Zalamea worked hard to get out the vote for Donald Trump.

He said Trump represents the American, Christian and Republican values he believes in.

President-elect Donald Trump.
user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

President-elect Donald Trump won Michigan Tuesday by the narrowest margin in the state’s history.

Pollsters say rural and blue collar voters put Trump over the top by the narrowest of majorities – just over a quarter of a percentage point -- .27 percent. You’d have to go back to the 1940 election – Wendell Wilkie versus President Franklin Roosevelt – to find a margin nearly as close.

Another thought on why Clinton lost

Nov 10, 2016

I spent yesterday working in my office and hearing from people whose emotional state could be compared to that of survivors from a destroyed village. They were in utter despair and wanted hope. Donald Trump, a man whose campaign had been defined by attacks on women, immigrants, Muslims, Mexicans, and general boorish behavior, was President-elect of the United States.

Angela Russo, a former student of mine, an occupational therapist in her early 30s and a former television reporter, was mostly stunned.


president trump
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Hundreds of people gathered on U of M's Ann Arbor campus yesterday to protest Donald Trump's election. The president-elect used sexist and racially charged speech for the majority of his campaign.

David Schafer is a senior at U of M.

He says the key for students is to stay involved after the vigil.

“I think it's ensuring that our work does not start and stop tonight or even tomorrow or next week,” he said. “I think it's continuing to challenge people who might be saying problematic things.

House Minority Leader Tim Greimel.
WKAR-TV

Republicans have hung onto their majority in the state House. Meanwhile Democrats are planning a change of leadership for next year.

President-elect Donald Trump’s surprise victory trickled down to the House Republicans. The House kept its Republican majority by the same numbers and puts them in a more relaxed position going into the Lame Duck session.

But the Democrats are getting a bit of a shake-up. House Minority Leader Tim Greimel announced he is not running to lead his caucus for the 2017-2018 session. This leaves a leadership hole in the minority party. 

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