Election 2016 | Michigan Radio
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Election 2016

Here you'll find the latest election coverage from Michigan Radio. Scroll below for information and stories. 

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In Michigan, Donald Trump beat Hillary Clinton by less than three-tenths of one percent of the total votes. With polls and pundits across the state and the nation predicting a win for Clinton, people of all political stripes were stunned by the election's result.

Stateside went out onto the streets and handed the microphone over to people so they could share their thoughts on the day after this historic election. There were feelings of joy, of fear, of sadness, of relief, of uncertainty. You can hear them above. 

FLICKR USER 401(K) 2012 / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Over the last few weeks, Michigan all of a sudden became a battleground state.

Both candidates and their surrogates barnstormed across Michigan to rally supporters and get out the vote.

RNC Chair Ronna Romney McDaniel holding a microphone
www.migop.org

 


Michigan has voted a Republican into the White House for the first time since 1988.

Michigan Republican Party Chairman Ronna Romney McDaniel told us the results were “absolutely” beyond what the party hoped for.

 


Donald Trump’s victory is seen as one of the watershed moments in American political history.

Michigan voters certainly played a role in this upset.

It’s Just Politics team Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta sat down with us today to dive into what happened in our state.

 bus
flickr user Matt Picio / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

If you favored the Regional Transit Authority millage, you saw a big step towards the connected, regional transportation system that’s never existed in Southeast Michigan.

If you opposed it, you saw a tax hike for services you likely don’t need or care about.

The opposition won. Southeast Michigan voters said “no” to the RTA millage.

Megan Owens of Transportation Riders United spoke with us today.

Flickr user jdog90 / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Detroit has itself a new school board chosen from a field of 63 candidates. Bridge Magazine reporter Chastity Pratt Dawsey joined Stateside to talk about the seven winners and what’s ahead for them.

Polling station sign
user jaina / Creative Commons


Many Americans were stunned and blindsided by Donald Trump’s victory over Hillary Clinton.

That’s largely because months and months of polls pointed to a defeat of our new president-elect.

Zach Gorchow, editor of Gongwer News Service, joined us today to talk about those polls.

“Polling has a lot of problems. It’s just not able to model the electorate successfully, and that seems to be especially true in Michigan,” Gorchow said. “It just flat out failed to model the African-American turnout correctly, it failed to model the rural turnout correctly."

Marijuana advocates collected more than 300,000 signatures earlier this year, only to have them rejected for failing to meet a state rule on collecting signatures.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan marijuana advocates say legalization may be an “easier sell” after ballot victories in California and other states on Tuesday.

MI-Legalize executive director Jeff Hank is feeling good these days.

“The next election’s already started for us,” Hank says with a laugh.

A very good day for the GOP candidates

Nov 9, 2016

When I finally went to bed, what popped into my head was something the great cynical journalist H.L. Mencken used to say. “Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want – and deserve to get it, good and hard.”

They will now get change, though what form that will take, nobody can say. What’s clear is that they wanted something different, and that the scope and the depths of their discontent was something that none of the experts grasped.


Voters in Midland cast ballots for Republicans, Democrats and Libertarians on Tuesday.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s Libertarian Party didn’t win many races Tuesday, but the party received more votes than it has in the past.

Libertarian Presidential candidate Gary Johnson picked up nearly 170,000 votes in Michigan. Many local candidates did very well too. Some getting more than 5% of the votes cast in their races.

“These are not wins,” says Bill Gelineau, Michigan’s Libertarian Party chairman. “This doesn’t mean that we’re sitting in the Legislature. But it does mean that we’re becoming a bigger and bigger part of the conversation.”

Lessenberry breaks down Election 2016

Nov 9, 2016
Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

America has a new president-elect this morning, but the jury is still out when it comes to which candidate will carry Michigan.

On this Week in Michigan Politics Doug Tribou and Jack Lessenberry talk about how Donald Trump could become the first Republican to carry the state since 1988. They also discuss Republican victories in the 1st and 7th Congressional Districts, and the Republican's sustained control of  the state House and Supreme Court.


Trump Tower in Chicago. The real-estate mogul and political outsider shocked the world today with his win in the presidential election.
Daniel Huizinga / https://www.flickr.com/photos/dhuiz/16001109780

For the first time since 1988, Michigan appears to have helped elect a Republican president. The state’s 16 electoral votes will go to Republican nominee Donald Trump if the narrow victory holds.

Scott Hagerstrom is Trump’s Michigan campaign chairman. He says the results show Trump’s unconventional campaign strategy worked.

“He went into Detroit. He went into Flint – against what everyone said, but he did because he is, that’s what he’s going to do for our country,” he said. “He’s going to be a fighter for the American people.”

gop.gov / gop.gov

After 24 years, Macomb County has a new public works commissioner: retiring Republican Congresswoman Candice Miller.

The race for that typically low-profile, decidedly un-glamorous job got nasty--and expensive—this year.

Democrat Anthony Marrocco has been Macomb’s public works commissioner for 24 years.

The job description is all about managing sewers and storm drains. But the commissioner also controls important construction permits, and some very large county contracts.

Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Voters in Kent County approved two separate measures to support a zoo, museum and improved services for an emergency dispatch.

A millage increase will help pay to repair and improve exhibits at the Grand Rapids Public Museum. It’ll also help pay to care for animals at John Ball Zoo. Backers estimate it’ll raise a little over $9 million a year. WOOD-TV reports the additional .44 mills will cost the owner of a $170,000 home $37.40 more per year through 2025.

Michigan's Hall of Justice.
Eridony / flickr

The two races for Michigan Supreme Court have gone to the incumbents.

Michigan Supreme Court Justices Joan Larsen and David Viviano held onto their seats on Michigan’s highest court.

Larsen defeated Wayne County Judge Deborah Thomas and lawyer Kerry Morgan. Gov. Rick Snyder appointed Larsen to the court in 2015 to replace a justice who resigned. She's now been elected to serve the two years remaining on that term.

Republican incumbent Tim Walberg beat Democratic challenger Gretchen Driskell in 2016. Now, Driskell is announcing she'll run again in 2018.
Tim Walberg for Congress; Gretchen Driskell for Congress

Republican Congressman Tim Walberg beat Democratic state lawmaker Gretchen Driskell in the 7th District.

That race was one of the most expensive in the state, with both candidates raising more than $2 million each. Democrats were hoping this district would be a tossup race, since the voter registrations are split almost 50/50 between Democrats and Republicans.

Driskell alone put about a million dollars into TV ads, trying to depict herself as a job-focused independent, and paint Congressman Tim Walberg as "Trade Deal Tim."

Muralist at work at NPR
NPR - Facebook

NPR has a muralist painting state-by-state results in the middle of its newsroom as results come in.

You can watch below.

The candidate with 270 electoral votes or more wins the presidency.

Wikimedia Commons

It’s been a rough election day for Marie Wicks, the city clerk of East Lansing.

This morning, she got word of a possible voter intimidation incident: a voter reported a man pulling two women wearing hijabs out of line at a polling site, and possibly redirecting them to another polling place.

Then the lines at Michigan State University campus started getting longer. Really, really long.

Sign directing voters to polling place
Steven Depolo / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0 cropped

When Mother Jones published a story called “Voter Intimidation Targeting Muslims Reported at Michigan Polling Site,” Tuesday afternoon, Ron Fox started getting a lot of calls.

Today, as results come in across the country, NPR reporters will be updating this breaking news blog in real time. The NPR Politics team, along with Member station reporters, will be providing live updates in the form of photo, video, commentary and analysis for both national and local contested races.

"Vote here" sign
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Here are election results from the major races we are following. 

Sign directing voters to polling place
Steven Depolo / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0 cropped

Long delays at some voting places in Washtenaw and Wayne counties have caused some voters to leave before casting their ballots, according to a non-partisan election protection coalition in Michigan that is working in partnership with the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. 

"There've been issues on the campus at the University of Michigan where students are waiting for two and three hours to vote. But all of the poll booths are set up and empty," said Melanie McElroy, director of the Michigan coalition. "They're merely waiting to be checked in electronically."

It's Election Day, but that doesn't mean the fun stops here. Grossmann told us many politicians are looking four years ahead, and, "in some ways, [the 2020 presidential campaign] has already started."
Ryan Grimes / Michigan Radio

 

Election Day marks the finish line of a grueling, fractious and long campaign.

It started with Ted Cruz announcing his candidacy in March 2015.

Twenty months later, many Americans are expressing their exhaustion with the process.

Many people are looking wistfully to other countries like Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland and France, which elect their leaders in a few weeks and then move on.

Michigan State University associate professor of political science Matt Grossmann sat down with us today to talk about how the process for electing our president became so protracted.

Who needs elections when you have this monkey?
Screen grab from Agence France-Presse / https://www.yahoo.com/news/china-monkey-king-picks-trump-next-us-president-002407936.html

We're all waiting for the election results to come in tonight, but for some the election has already been called.

We've got reports from four animals that have predicted the outcome.

First, there's a psychic, Scottish goat named Boots. He has a pretty good track record considering he correctly predicted the United Kingdom would leave the European Union, the Scottish Sun reports

Tim Walberg
US House of Representative

Where is Tim Walberg? The Republican congressman from Michigan’s 7th district is in a fierce battle for reelection, raising millions of dollars, and pouring huge amounts of money into a slew of attack ads against his Democratic opponent. You would not think he’d be an especially hard guy to reach these days.

If you care about your country, you'll be happy you voted

Nov 8, 2016

The late Theodore H. White, the prose poet of our national elections, wrote what remains the most lyrical and magical evocation of the meaning of this day.

“It was invisible, as always. They had begun to vote in the villages of New Hampshire at midnight, as they always do … all of this is invisible, for it is the essence of the act that as it happens, it is a mystery in which millions of people each fit one fragment of a total secret together, without knowing the shape of the whole.

Courtesy Michigan Radio

Unless you've been living under a rock, you know that today is Election Day. Voters today will decide on a President, members of Congress, state legislators and various ballot proposals.

With our votes having so much weight, some Michigan residents posted about the day on social media.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The presidential candidates and their surrogates swung through Michigan on the final day before the polls opened.

President Obama was in Michigan as part of a tour of battleground states. The president tried to drum up support for Hillary Clinton and the rest of the Democratic ticket during a rally in Ann Arbor.

Obama spoke to a crowd of about nine thousand people at the University of Michigan. He told first-time voters in the audience that this year has been a strange one in politics. The president said he’s been frustrated by a lot of the news coverage of the campaign.

Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at Grand Valley State University the day before Election Day.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

The election is tomorrow, but if you thought the major party candidates were going to take a break, you would be wrong. Michigan has secured its position as a battleground state.

Both major party presidential candidates are stopping in West Michigan in the hours before the polls open.

Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton talked jobs and the economy during a rally at Grand Valley State University. But she also focused on bringing the country together after a very divisive election.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Next Idea

One of my favorite movies from last year was The Big Short. It brilliantly explained many of the complex factors that set in motion the collapse of the subprime mortgage market. It also captured the arrogance of the age. But the movie got one thing wrong. It suggested that only a few insiders understood what was really happening, when in fact many professionals and academics knew as early as 2003 that a crash was coming.

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