Families & Community | Michigan Radio
WUOMFM

Families & Community

Anthony Brown

There wasn’t always such a clear dividing line between the two neighborhoods on either side of Alter Road.

man looking at cell phone
Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

This week, a group of faith leaders is taking a caravan of protestors 1,700 miles from Ann Arbor to the Tornillo detention center in Texas. 

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

Their souls left long ago.

Their bodies stayed here.

Their families put their faith in a funeral home on Detroit’s east side.

But then, earlier this year, their remains were discovered, still in the funeral home months and even years after their deaths. At first, it was a few bodies. Then, the cremated remains of more than a hundred. Then, tucked away in an attic, investigators found the remains of several fetuses.

The shock still hasn’t worn off. The full investigation into what happened isn’t yet over.

Today, there was a memorial.

Today, they were laid to rest.

Father Jim Houbeck and Father Ed Prus
Lindsey Scullen / Michigan Radio

Taking that first step down a career path can be daunting, like stepping into a world completely unknown. On the flip side, if you’ve been walking that road a long time, chances are you’ve learned a thing or two.

Father Jim Houbeck, a newly ordained Catholic priest, sat down with Father Ed Prus, who has recently retired, to discuss their lives in this vocation. Their conversation is part of Stateside's Work in Progress series, where we bring together two people to talk about what it's like to be at opposite ends of the same career path. 

A photo of the Cheboiganing Band village before it was burned in 1900.
Courtesy of the Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians

This is the final part of our series An Idea on the Land. Here's where you can find Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3. 

On a chilly morning, 118 autumns ago, the residents of a tiny village along a lake in Northern Michigan were forced out of their homes and kicked off the land they had legally purchased.

The residents were native people, members of what was then called the Cheboiganing Band of Indians. There’s some evidence native people had been living at that site for thousands of years.

But since that morning, on Oct. 15, 1900, their land has been in the hands of others. And the descendants of those who were there that morning are still fighting for justice and recognition in the courts today.

courtesy Yale Divinity School


If you’ve been listening to our series An Idea on the Land, then you’ve heard the voice of Willie Jennings. He’s a professor at Yale Divinity school and author of the book The Christian Imagination: Theology and the Origins of Race.

Jennings' work deals with subjects that, for some of us, can be very sensitive. The history of whiteness. The distorted view of Christianity that drove European colonialism. We’ve tried to present those ideas the best we could in our series, but after speaking to Jennings, I’ve had the sense that at least some people would want to hear more. So we’re making this extended interview available as well. This has been lightly edited, mostly to clean up the audio. The quality is still not perfect at times, but you should be able to at least hear what’s being said.

 

james redford
Cheyna Roth / Michigan Radio

 

Michigan has consistently ranked in the bottom five states and territories when it comes to helping veterans and their families access federal VA benefits. In 2013, Governor Rick Snyder created the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency to address the state's low ranking. 

Yet five years after the governor created the MVAA to address the issue, Michigan still ranks near the bottom in connecting veterans with benefits. We conclude our week-long series on the issue with a conversation with James Redford, director of the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency.

Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

Michigan has consistently ranked in the bottom five states and territories when it comes to helping veterans and their families access federal VA benefits.

Why are so many Michigan vets not getting the benefits they've earned?

 

All week, Stateside has been digging into this question. We've talked to veterans from two different generations about their experiences returning home. A county-level veteran services administrator shared his concerns about the lack of staff available to help veterans connect to benefits. We also heard from a state representative about what progress the state has — and has not — made. 

Motor Corps and Canteen volunteers from the Detroit chapter of the American Red Cross, taking a break from delivering supplies to influenza victims.
NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION

Today on Stateside, Libertarian gubernatorial candidate Bill Gelineau says he would cut Medicaid costs by rewarding young women for not getting pregnant before age 23. Plus, 100 years ago, the world’s deadliest flu pandemic hit Michigan and killed roughly 19,000 people.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Shelter leader responds to complaints from homeless Kalamazoo residents in ongoing protests

Over 200 people joined Morning Edition host Doug Tribou at Bill’s Beer Garden in Ann Arbor this past Tuesday for our Issues & Ale discussion about the challenges surrounding downtown development in cities that are booming across Michigan.

Doug was joined by panelists Christopher Taylor, Mayor of Ann Arbor; Carolyn Loh, Associate Prof. of Urban Studies and Planning at Wayne State University; and Ben Phillips, Vice President, Develop Detroit.

 Reimund Holzhey mugshot
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, after a contentious city council meeting, Kalamazoo is moving to meet the demands of homeless protestors camped out in a downtown park. Plus, nationally-recognized teacher Matinga Ragatz talks about why she thinks school reform is hurting, not helping, students.

Kalamazoo, MI

A conflict between Kalamazoo and a group of homeless people has entered its third week.

Some people have been camping in downtown Bronson Park to protest the lack of shelter space and a long-term plan to help people find permanent housing.

The city tried to get them to move to two other places, but both were rejected, because of concerns about lack of safety or shade, among other reasons.

Jim Ritsema is Kalamazoo's city manager.  He says the protesters are violating a city ordinance by staying overnight in a park.

Music teachers Erick Senkmajer and Erika Senecal
Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

Taking that first step down a career path can be daunting, like stepping into a world completely unknown.

On the flip side, if you've been walking that path a while, odds are you've learned a thing or two.

Kalamazoo, MI

The city of Kalamazoo has struck a deal with a group of homeless protesters who were refusing to leave a downtown park.

Detroit skyline
Justin McAfee / Unsplash

How is design playing a role in Detroit’s revitalization?

That question will be on many designers’ minds at the first-ever Detroit Month of Design. It runs the entire month of September with events all around the city.

Kamryn Chasnis holding piece of bread
Courtesy of Kamryn Chasnis

 


Thirteen-year-old Kamryn Chasnis of Saginaw Township has been baking and cooking her whole life.

When she began watching cooking shows, there were only adult competitors. But then stations began to launch children's competitions, and Chasnis wanted to compete. 

Harold Becker (left) and Sean Tracy (right) in the Stateside studio.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

When it comes to thanking the nation's veterans, some would say we can never do it enough.

Sean Tracy has taken that gratitude to a whole new level.

He travels throughout the Midwest recording veterans’ oral histories and crafting tribute walls at Independence Village and StoryPoint, senior living communities where he serves as the Veteran Project coordinator.

tyson and sparks together in red and blue dress
Courtesy of Monica Sparks

There's a unique story playing out in West Michigan politics. Twin sisters are both running for seats on the Kent County Board of Commissioners for opposing parties.

Since they live in different districts, they could end up serving on the board together, but on opposite sides of the aisle.

Jessica Ann Tyson is a Republican. Her twin sister, Monica Sparks, is a Democrat.

cityofgrayling.org

The northern Michigan city of Grayling is receiving a $250,000 state grant to help build a "food hub" that will put commercial kitchens, vendor spaces, a restaurant and a farmers' market under one roof.

The Michigan Commission of Agriculture and Rural Development recently approved the funding, which will help pay for engineering and development plans as well as bidding and construction documents for the Northern Market.

Stateside 8.24.2018

Aug 24, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear from the candidates for lieutenant governor on the Democratic and Republican ticket. Plus, a riff on the classic gimlet cocktail that uses an ancient Scandanavian spirit. 

delapidated Detroit house
Jason Paris / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Last week, the Detroit Free Press published an investigation detailing what happens to properties that are foreclosed upon because of delinquent taxes. It is a complicated tale with a now-predictable ending: previously well-kept houses deteriorate into blighted eyesores.

Traditional media outlets have enhanced their community presence, oftentimes these communities have established networks of communication, engagement, and in some cases, content production.

 

Take MorningSide for example. The neighborhood is home to two podcast studios. One belongs to Jonathan “JG” Galloway of Audio Wave Network and another is housed at the Bethany Lutheran Church which is led by Pastor Christopher Bodley.

 

Rising rents. Falling wages. Detroit’s poor face housing crisis.

Aug 21, 2018
Bridge Magazine

Clark Washington Jr. works 10 hours a day, five days a week driving a hi-lo on a shift that starts at 9 p.m.

He keeps his costs low, living with his 70-year-old father, and only has one major expense: his cell phone.

Trouble is, he makes entry-level wages, $9 an hour, and that makes it hard nowadays to find housing in Detroit, the poorest big city in the United States.

board game
Tetzemann / Pixabay

 


"Everything old is new again."

That adage comes to mind when you hear about a new business in West Michigan called Lakeshore Game Night, a door-to-door delivery for board games.

Jared Leatzow is the business’ founder and owner. He joined Stateside’s Cynthia Canty to discuss how he came up with the idea for Lakeshore Game Night and how the service works. 

The MorningSide divide

Aug 15, 2018
Kate Gowman

I grew up in Detroit during the ‘80s, a period of recession and white flight. As industry left, our community went from being a stable middle-class neighborhood to one that was falling apart at the seams. Cultural centers disappeared and money for education and other city services evaporated.

grace french in front of white house
Courtesy of Grace French

Seven months ago, the world watched as dozens of survivors stood up in Michigan courtrooms to share their stories of abuse by the former Michigan State University sports doctor Larry Nassar.

One of those survivors, Amanda Thornashow, said to Nassar, “You didn’t realize you were building an army of survivors who see you for what you are: a sexual predator.”

Stateside 8.6.2018

Aug 6, 2018

For children with anxiety, life can be scary. Today on Stateside, we hear what Camp Kid Power does to help. And we learn you can, in fact, vote in Michigan after serving time in prison.

Pirates on a ship at the Michigan Pirate Festival
Dagny Mol / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

If you find yourself in Grand Haven this week, be prepared!

The 12th annual Michigan Pirate Festival is happening Tuesday through Saturday, so Grand Haven will be invaded by fun-loving pirates. 

Courtesy of Camp Kid Power

Some 20 percent of preschool-age kids in this country have some type of anxiety disorder. That's according to a 2014 paper published in the Journal of Clinical Adolescent Psychology.

Youngsters with anxiety can find it challenging to enjoy activities like summer camp.

And that's where Camp Kid Power comes in.

chair lift at bottom of stairs
Wikimedia / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The larger Metro Detroit area, including the inner-ring suburbs, the outer-ring suburbs, and the surrounding counties, is beginning to face a new problem that's only going to get bigger.

We have an aging population, and our housing stock is largely inadequate for those older residents, especially when it comes to negotiating physical barriers like steps.

Pages