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Motor Corps and Canteen volunteers from the Detroit chapter of the American Red Cross, taking a break from delivering supplies to influenza victims.
NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION

Today on Stateside, Libertarian gubernatorial candidate Bill Gelineau says he would cut Medicaid costs by rewarding young women for not getting pregnant before age 23. Plus, 100 years ago, the world’s deadliest flu pandemic hit Michigan and killed roughly 19,000 people.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Shelter leader responds to complaints from homeless Kalamazoo residents in ongoing protests

Over 200 people joined Morning Edition host Doug Tribou at Bill’s Beer Garden in Ann Arbor this past Tuesday for our Issues & Ale discussion about the challenges surrounding downtown development in cities that are booming across Michigan.

Doug was joined by panelists Christopher Taylor, Mayor of Ann Arbor; Carolyn Loh, Associate Prof. of Urban Studies and Planning at Wayne State University; and Ben Phillips, Vice President, Develop Detroit.

 Reimund Holzhey mugshot
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, after a contentious city council meeting, Kalamazoo is moving to meet the demands of homeless protestors camped out in a downtown park. Plus, nationally-recognized teacher Matinga Ragatz talks about why she thinks school reform is hurting, not helping, students.

Kalamazoo, MI

A conflict between Kalamazoo and a group of homeless people has entered its third week.

Some people have been camping in downtown Bronson Park to protest the lack of shelter space and a long-term plan to help people find permanent housing.

The city tried to get them to move to two other places, but both were rejected, because of concerns about lack of safety or shade, among other reasons.

Jim Ritsema is Kalamazoo's city manager.  He says the protesters are violating a city ordinance by staying overnight in a park.

Music teachers Erick Senkmajer and Erika Senecal
Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

Taking that first step down a career path can be daunting, like stepping into a world completely unknown.

On the flip side, if you've been walking that path a while, odds are you've learned a thing or two.

Kalamazoo, MI

The city of Kalamazoo has struck a deal with a group of homeless protesters who were refusing to leave a downtown park.

Detroit skyline
Justin McAfee / Unsplash

How is design playing a role in Detroit’s revitalization?

That question will be on many designers’ minds at the first-ever Detroit Month of Design. It runs the entire month of September with events all around the city.

Kamryn Chasnis holding piece of bread
Courtesy of Kamryn Chasnis

 


Thirteen-year-old Kamryn Chasnis of Saginaw Township has been baking and cooking her whole life.

When she began watching cooking shows, there were only adult competitors. But then stations began to launch children's competitions, and Chasnis wanted to compete. 

Harold Becker (left) and Sean Tracy (right) in the Stateside studio.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

When it comes to thanking the nation's veterans, some would say we can never do it enough.

Sean Tracy has taken that gratitude to a whole new level.

He travels throughout the Midwest recording veterans’ oral histories and crafting tribute walls at Independence Village and StoryPoint, senior living communities where he serves as the Veteran Project coordinator.

tyson and sparks together in red and blue dress
Courtesy of Monica Sparks

There's a unique story playing out in West Michigan politics. Twin sisters are both running for seats on the Kent County Board of Commissioners for opposing parties.

Since they live in different districts, they could end up serving on the board together, but on opposite sides of the aisle.

Jessica Ann Tyson is a Republican. Her twin sister, Monica Sparks, is a Democrat.

cityofgrayling.org

The northern Michigan city of Grayling is receiving a $250,000 state grant to help build a "food hub" that will put commercial kitchens, vendor spaces, a restaurant and a farmers' market under one roof.

The Michigan Commission of Agriculture and Rural Development recently approved the funding, which will help pay for engineering and development plans as well as bidding and construction documents for the Northern Market.

Stateside 8.24.2018

Aug 24, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear from the candidates for lieutenant governor on the Democratic and Republican ticket. Plus, a riff on the classic gimlet cocktail that uses an ancient Scandanavian spirit. 

delapidated Detroit house
Jason Paris / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Last week, the Detroit Free Press published an investigation detailing what happens to properties that are foreclosed upon because of delinquent taxes. It is a complicated tale with a now-predictable ending: previously well-kept houses deteriorate into blighted eyesores.

Traditional media outlets have enhanced their community presence, oftentimes these communities have established networks of communication, engagement, and in some cases, content production.

 

Take MorningSide for example. The neighborhood is home to two podcast studios. One belongs to Jonathan “JG” Galloway of Audio Wave Network and another is housed at the Bethany Lutheran Church which is led by Pastor Christopher Bodley.

 

Rising rents. Falling wages. Detroit’s poor face housing crisis.

Aug 21, 2018
Bridge Magazine

Clark Washington Jr. works 10 hours a day, five days a week driving a hi-lo on a shift that starts at 9 p.m.

He keeps his costs low, living with his 70-year-old father, and only has one major expense: his cell phone.

Trouble is, he makes entry-level wages, $9 an hour, and that makes it hard nowadays to find housing in Detroit, the poorest big city in the United States.

board game
Tetzemann / Pixabay

 


"Everything old is new again."

That adage comes to mind when you hear about a new business in West Michigan called Lakeshore Game Night, a door-to-door delivery for board games.

Jared Leatzow is the business’ founder and owner. He joined Stateside’s Cynthia Canty to discuss how he came up with the idea for Lakeshore Game Night and how the service works. 

The MorningSide divide

Aug 15, 2018
Kate Gowman

I grew up in Detroit during the ‘80s, a period of recession and white flight. As industry left, our community went from being a stable middle-class neighborhood to one that was falling apart at the seams. Cultural centers disappeared and money for education and other city services evaporated.

grace french in front of white house
Courtesy of Grace French

Seven months ago, the world watched as dozens of survivors stood up in Michigan courtrooms to share their stories of abuse by the former Michigan State University sports doctor Larry Nassar.

One of those survivors, Amanda Thornashow, said to Nassar, “You didn’t realize you were building an army of survivors who see you for what you are: a sexual predator.”

Stateside 8.6.2018

Aug 6, 2018

For children with anxiety, life can be scary. Today on Stateside, we hear what Camp Kid Power does to help. And we learn you can, in fact, vote in Michigan after serving time in prison.

Pirates on a ship at the Michigan Pirate Festival
Dagny Mol / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

If you find yourself in Grand Haven this week, be prepared!

The 12th annual Michigan Pirate Festival is happening Tuesday through Saturday, so Grand Haven will be invaded by fun-loving pirates. 

Courtesy of Camp Kid Power

Some 20 percent of preschool-age kids in this country have some type of anxiety disorder. That's according to a 2014 paper published in the Journal of Clinical Adolescent Psychology.

Youngsters with anxiety can find it challenging to enjoy activities like summer camp.

And that's where Camp Kid Power comes in.

chair lift at bottom of stairs
Wikimedia / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The larger Metro Detroit area, including the inner-ring suburbs, the outer-ring suburbs, and the surrounding counties, is beginning to face a new problem that's only going to get bigger.

We have an aging population, and our housing stock is largely inadequate for those older residents, especially when it comes to negotiating physical barriers like steps.

Person in gray hoodie with one hand cuffed and the other cuff hanging open in front of a cloudy sky
Pexels / Pixabay

Think of someone with cancer, or hypertension, or diabetes.

Imagine hauling a person with cancer or diabetes before a judge, and charging him with a crime for having that disease? Obviously not, but that's what's happening to people in the grips of the disease of addiction. 

A program called Hope Not Handcuffs is trying to change that paradigm by working with police agencies and the courts. 

renaissance center
Mike Boening Photography / flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

This week, 3,000 journalists from around the world come to Detroit for the annual convention of the National Association of Black Journalists. The NABJ hasn't held its convention in the Motor City since 1992.

Marquan Kane
Gabrielle Horton / Michigan Radio

Marquan Kane knows poverty. He’s seen what gun violence and drugs have done to people he loves.

His response? To work for social reform and challenge other young people to join him in a new civil rights movement.

Kane has been named Washtenaw County’s 2018 Young Citizen of the Year to recognize his work in criminal justice reform. Governor Snyder appointed him to Michigan’s Committee on Juvenile Justice. On top of that, he also recently graduated from Ann Arbor Pioneer High School.

bologna kings and queens
Courtesy of Barbie Stasick

 


Stateside continues its look at unusual Michigan festivals with The Yale Bologna Festival, which draws thousands of attendees to Michigan's Thumb to honor the beloved lunchmeat. 

C-Span

U.S. Senators grilled former Michigan governor John Engler about his leadership at Michigan State University. Engler is currently interim president of MSU.

The hearing was one of three so far in response to Larry Nassar, the former MSU sports doctor who sexually assaulted his patients for decades and will spend decades in prison. 

Engler came under fire during the hearing for statements he made about some survivors and recent hires at the school.

Clarise Kramer Cadarette Grzenkowicz
Alpena Convention & Visitors Bureau / Facebook.com

 


Ninety-nine-year-old Clarise Kramer Cadarette Grzenkowicz has been bartending at the Maplewood Tavern near Alpena, Michigan for the past 78 years. 

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

There's something about the a crackling campfire and the looming mystery of a nighttime forest that creates the perfect atmosphere for telling a special kind of story.

Some campfire stories aim to send a shiver down your spine. Others seek to remember a past moment in history or teach a good life lesson.

With that tradition in mind, Stateside will be bringing you a series of stories this summer perfect for your next bonfire. 

Downtown Detroit Partnership

A popular sand beach in the heart of downtown Detroit is getting a little sprucing up.

The Downtown Detroit Partnership says a $125,000 grant from the Southwest Airlines Foundation will be used to improve the beach at Campus Martius Park.

Beach furniture, toys and games, lighting and landscaping will be enhanced. Beer and wine tastings will be among new events at the beach, which opened in 2014.

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