Families & Community | Michigan Radio
WUOMFM

Families & Community

Stateside 7.12.2018

Jul 12, 2018

On today's Stateside, as robots begin to look and sound more like real humans, how will that change the way  that we interact with them in our everyday lives? Plus, a conversation with Motown royalty and founding member of The Four Tops Abdul “Duke” Fakir about the timeless appeal of Motown music.

To listen to individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Rendering of the memorial
Michigan World War II Legacy Memorial Board

 

Governor Snyder has signed a new tax law that offers assistance to a proposed World War Two memorial in Oakland County.

The law adds the Michigan WWII Legacy Memorial to the list of organizations you'll be able to donate to through your state income tax return.

Deb Hollis is the president of the Michigan World War II Legacy Memorial Board. She joined Stateside’s Cynthia Canty to discuss the current status of the Memorial and effect of this new law. 

The Walker Tavern Wheels pose in their uniforms in front of a scoreboard
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

This weekend, baseball fans will roll the clock way back, more than 150 years.

There's a four-game tournament of early baseball happening at Cambridge Junction Historic State Park in Brooklyn, Michigan.

That's where the Walker Tavern Wheels will be hosting an invitational with the Saginaw Old Golds, the Detroit Early Risers, and the Canton Cornshuckers.

Stateside 7.10.2018

Jul 10, 2018

Today on Stateside, a grassroots effort to help migrant parents with transportation and resources after being reunited with their kids. Plus, a long-running Detroit concert celebrating cultural diversity through music inspires a sister festival in Jackson. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Three migrant dads reunited with their children in Grand Rapids

Rabbi Josh Whinston
Kathryn Condon / Michigan Radio

  

The plight of migrant children being separated from their families at detention centers has grabbed the attention of many across the country. The first reunification deadline to reunite children under five with their families was Tuesday.

From this crisis many grassroots groups have sprung up, as parents, teachers, foster parents, and religious leaders search for ways to help migrant families who were separated.

The Caliber Collection

The Wayne County Sheriff’s Office is working to decrease shootings in the city by route of decreasing guns in the city.

A gun buyback program is being offered in Detroit from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday at Oak Grove AME Church in Detroit. For every unloaded gun brought, a $50 gift card will be exchanged. No questions will be asked about the gun, although there is a three weapon limit per person.

skalekkar1992 / pixabay

At least three parents in Michigan are hoping to be reunited with their young children today, after being separated at the southern U.S. border.

Grow Detroit's Young Talent Website

More than $11 million has been raised to support Detroit's youth summer jobs program.

Mayor Mike Duggan announced Monday that 8,210 young people ages 14 to 24 will receive six weeks of training, on-the-job experiences, professional contacts, and exposure to potential career paths as part of Grow Detroit's Young Talent.

The city says most participants will work 20 hours per week at more than 500 sites with companies of various sizes. The companies include auto suppliers and law firms.

City of Flint

Flint has been awarded $30 million in federal money to tear down the aging, crumbling public housing complex known as Atherton East, and build a new, mixed-income development, in a different location.

Congressman Dan Kildee says Atherton East was part of a bad approach to public housing during the 1960s.

Joanne Savas in the studio holding a piece of a child's artwork
Lindsey Scullen / Michigan Radio

You don't need worldly goods or a big bank account to leave a priceless gift to your grandkids.

Joanna Savas of Ann Arbor wasn't able to leave large inheritances for her seven grandchildren, so she came up with something else: a book. 

A group of Sae Jong Campers
Sae Jong Camp

 


Summer camp means many things to campers, outdoor fun or just a chance to get away from parents and siblings.

For kids who come to Sae Jong Camp on Higgins Lake, it is also chance to be with others who share their heritage.

Sae Jong Camp is the nation's oldest continuously running Korean-American overnight summer camp.

It's held each year at Camp Westminster in Roscommon drawing campers from all around the country. This year marks the 44th anniversary of Sae Jong Camp.

Paula Reeves
Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

Last week, a 17-year old student opened fire at Santa Fe High School. He left 10 dead and 10 more injured.

With every mass shooting in the United States comes a cry to address the issue of mental health. Lawmakers say we need to identify these troubled kids — and get them mental health resources before something terrible happens.

a white scarf being thrown into a crowd of Elvis fans at Elvisfest
Courtesy of Mary Decker

It has been nearly 41 years since the passing of Elvis Presley, but "The King" can still draw a crowd.

Continuing Stateside's look at Michigan festivals, we headed to Ypsilanti for Michigan Elvisfest, taking place July 6 and 7 at Riverside Park. 

Bueno and other Luck Inc members
Courtesy of LUCK Inc.

 


Upon release from prison, ex-offenders often enter a world full of uncertainty. Where do you live? Where do you work? How do you survive? 

Mario Bueno tries to help people find these answers. He is the co-founder of Luck Inc., a non-profit headquartered in Detroit helping ex-offenders get on their feet. Bueno joined Stateside's Lester Graham to talk about how he started doing this work. 

Muslims hold a vigil in Royal Oak in response to attacks in Libya.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Supreme Court this week upheld President Trump’s ban on travel from seven countries: North Korea, Venezuela, Syria, Iran, Yemen, Libya, and Somalia. Five of these countries are majority-Muslim nations where many Michigan residents have family members.

Now, the Council on American-Islamic Relations - Michigan (CAIR) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) are partnering to look at how the upheld travel ban will impact Muslims living in Michigan. 

Hemingway sculpture missing from Beaver Island

Jun 27, 2018
Cynthia Hector-Johnson

A sculpture commemorating Ernest Hemingway is missing from outside the Beaver Island Public Library.

Library officials say they noticed the statue was missing last week, but didn’t immediately report it as stolen.

Patrick Mcginnity, director of the Beaver Island District Library, said the nine foot structure is bright orange and hard to miss.

man putting wedding ring on woman
Cinematic Imagery / Unsplash

 


June in Michigan means time to tuck away the storm windows, dust off that swimsuit, and maybe attend a wedding or two. 

Weddings are currently a more than a $1 billion a year business in Michigan.

But the wedding industry here might be even bigger if the state's tradition of "quickie weddings" at the turn of the last century had continued.

three boys playing basketball
User: healthiermi / Creative Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

While Michigan is making some progress in terms of children's well-being, a new report shows it still falls behind neighboring states.

The 2018 KIDS COUNT Data Book released by the Annie E. Casey Foundation assesses how kids are doing in the areas of health, education, economic well-being, and family and community.

Mr. Earl's neighborhood

Jun 25, 2018

 

Long before the city of Detroit rebranded itself, a tight-knit neighborhood on the far east side decided to make a name for itself. The community formerly known as NEAR (Neighborhood East Area Residents) wanted a name that could state their wishes, dreams, hopes and struggles aloud.

prison bars
Flickr user FatMandy / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Michigan’s prisons are in crisis. The state cannot find enough corrections officers to staff them. Older officers are retiring, others are quitting, and there are hundreds of officer positions waiting to be filled.

For corrections officerss like Lorraine Emery, that shortage means an exhausting, dangerous job is getting even tougher.

Emery has been a corrections officer for about 17 years. She’s currently at the Bellamy Creek Correctional Facility, in Ionia. When she gets home from her eight-hour shift, the first thing she does is change her clothes.

Stateside 6.20.2018

Jun 20, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear from a pair of Michigan foster parents who have opened up their home to three migrant children separated from their parents. Plus, a former paralympian wants to bring her passion for ballroom dancing to other dancers using wheelchairs. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

In this episode, we meet the founder of the Detroit Artists’ Test Lab, the head of an African American podcast network called Audiowave, neighborhood activists young and old, a closet poet, and the woman who taught The Slide to a generation of skaters at Royal Skateland roller rink.

Have no pity on our souls, ‘cause we don’t want it.

We’re proud, and we flaunt it, like a badge of courage.

We’ve taken blows, but we’re not discouraged.

Been down but never out, and you better know it.

Got scars, warts, and wrinkles, and we ain’t afraid to show it.

Poet and MorningSide resident Derrick Gray

Rachel and Adam / Bethany Christian Services

 


Young children separated from their families at the border cannot be held in immigration detention centers for more than three days. After 72 hours, the Office of Refugee Resettlement looks to find a shelter or foster care home for the child.  

 

Row of girls at ceremony
Courtesy of Michael Kuentz

 


Nine girls have made scouting history in Dearborn, becoming the first in Michigan to be recognized as official members of Cub Scout Pack 1112.

This comes after the Boy Scouts of America’s historic decision to allow girls to join the organization and advance through the ranks to Eagle Scout. 

Eight-year-old Carolyn Kuentz is one of those girls. Carolyn and her father Michael Kuentz, who is an assistant Cub Master for Pack 1112 talked with Stateside’s Cynthia Canty about the joys of scouting, and what this change means for the future of the Scouts.

Cynthia Drake lives in Ripley, just outside of Houghton. She holds a family photo album caked in mud.
Kaye LaFond / Michigan Radio

Residents are beginning the process of recovery after flash flooding rocked the western Upper Peninsula Sunday morning, leaving dozens of sinkholes, impassable roads, and reports of damage to hundreds of homes in Houghton County.

Stacy Peck, Tyler Trowbridge, and Wendy Botts
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

 


The opioid epidemic has been devastating to families and communities across America. For those struggling with addiction, getting clean can be a grueling process, even when they are able to get into a rehab facility. 

Tyler Trowbridge knows that struggle well, which is why he helped design Dirt City Sanctuary. Trowbridge, along with his co-founders Stacy Peck and Wendy Botts, joined Stateside to talk about their efforts to build a new kind of community for recovering addicts. 

Detainees being housed inside fenced rooms at a government facility.
U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

The Trump administration's zero-tolerance border policy has meant some 2,000 migrant children have been taken away from their families.

a family at IHOP
Joey Horan / Michigan Radio

More than a thousand people filled the grand hall of Burton Manor in Livonia to celebrate Eid, which marks the end of Ramadan. The event was organized by the Muslim Community of the Western Suburbs of Detroit whose director and Imam, Sheikh Ali Suleiman Ali, delivered the prayer.

The end of the holy month also marks the end of daylight fasting. To celebrate the occasion, the faithful hopped in their cars and drove up the street to IHOP, or should we say IHOb?

Hand holding
User: Mrs. Logic/flickr

 


The world is still reeling from the recent deaths of designer Kate Spade and chef and writer Anthony Bourdain. These tragedies have drawn the country's attention as rates of suicide continue to climb.

 

GabiSanda / pixabay

The Legislature has sent Governor Rick Snyder the new state budget, including a provision that attempts to cut funding to Planned Parenthood.

Snyder and the Legislature disagree on the provision, which could lead to a showdown on whether it will be enforced.

The provision in the budget would require county health departments to favor family planning clinics that don’t also offer abortions. State law already forbids the direct use of public money funds for abortions, so this would apply to money for services unrelated to terminating a pregnancy.

Pages