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There’s been a big jump in the number of animals in Michigan testing positive for rabies.

This year, 22 bats and two skunks have tested positive for rabies. 

Micheal Hicks / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

It is the 157th birthday of someone whose life is proof that you shouldn't let the negative opinions of your professor get in the way of your ambitions.

William Mayo, half of the dynamic duo who went on to found the famed Mayo Clinic, was born this week in 1861.

Dr. Howard Markel, University of Michigan medical historian and PBS contributor, joined Stateside to tell us about his extraordinary life. 

narcan kit
zamboni-man / FLICKR - https://flic.kr/p/mjCzqS

The opioid epidemic reaches every corner of life in our state.

That includes libraries, where administrators and staff are figuring out the best response if a patron appears to be under the influence of drugs, or potentially experiencing an opioid overdose.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report is calling for more to be done to improve drinking water quality at the nation’s child care centers.

The Environmental Defense Fund tested water samples from child day care facilities in four states, including Michigan. 

A mosquito
flickr user trebol-a / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Mosquito control briquettes have been applied to nearly 18,000 catch basins in a Detroit suburb. Warren says it's the first application of the mosquito repellants this year by public works employees. Another application is scheduled for August.

Mosquitoes can breed in catch basins, tire swings, buckets, and anything else that holds standing water.

Warren Mayor James Fouts says the control measures are aimed at protecting residents from West Nile virus and other illnesses that can be contracted from mosquitoes and ticks.

anxiety
Sharon Sinclair / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Feeling anxious or unsettled? You're not alone. An online poll from the American Psychiatric Association finds 39 percent of American adults reported themselves as more anxious today than they were in 2017.

a phoropter at an eye doctor's office
Plane J / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

There are more than 3 million Americans living with glaucoma. As Baby Boomers march into their senior years, that number is inevitably going to go up.

Now, researchers at the University of Michigan have come up with a medical implant that measures just 1 millimeter, and it's changing the way we treat glaucoma.

Gavel
Joe Gratz / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The opioid epidemic is causing death and havoc for families all across the United States.

Hundreds of state and local governments have filed lawsuits against the manufacturers of the prescription opioids. Among those suing are 50 cities in Michigan.

There is a big hurdle for those Michigan cities to clear, though. A 1995 state law, sponsored by then-state senator Bill Schuette, gave pharmaceutical companies protection from lawsuits filed by consumers.

Stateside 6.14.2018

Jun 14, 2018

Today on Stateside, how to talk to a friend or family member who you think may be considering suicide. Plus, Detroit reporter Charlie LeDuff talks race, politics, and more in his new book Sh*tshow.

To listen to individual interviews, click here or see below: 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report finds Michigan’s suicide rate increased by a third over the last 20 years.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports between 1999 and 2016 Michigan’s suicide rate increased by 33 percent. That’s slightly higher than the 30 percent rate of increase nationally. 

The increase was even higher in more than 20 other states. North Dakota posted a nearly 60 percent increase in suicides during the past two decades. Only Nevada saw its suicide rate decline since 1999.

huntlh / pixabay

Four patient-care organizations have come out in opposition to a bill that would create work requirements for Medicaid recipients.

In a written statement, the Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, and Leukemia & Lymphoma Society said three-quarters of Medicaid recipients already work.

“For a variety of reasons a chronically ill person may not be able to meet that work requirement and then they may lose coverage of what, in many cases, is life saving coverage," said Sarah Poole with the American Heart Association. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The state health department is out with a new report on the deadly Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Genesee County.

The Michigan Department Health and Human Services makes an old claim linking most of the legionella cases to Flint’s McLaren hospital.

Stateside 5.23.2018

May 23, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear how Michigan pressed the feds to come up with PFAS standards at the EPA's national summit. And, we learn hackers are mining for Bitcoin, and they might be using your computer. Also today, we learn that a mother tried to tell the state her son was mentally ill and violent, but help came too late.

Team fEMR

We often ask listeners to reach out with stories we could share on Stateside. Here's an example of when someone did just that, writing to tell us about a Detroit-based nonprofit that can save lives.

It's called Team fEMR, a free and open source electronic medical records system for short-term medical service trips. It allows medical volunteers to record and pass along patient records to the next group of volunteers.

BORYA - CREATIVE COMMONS / HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

How do you know if nursing homes and assisted living communities are treating you or your loved ones properly, and what do you do if they’re not?

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s a new tool that Michigan cities can use to better understand their health care needs.

The NYU School of Medicine has developed what they call the City Health Dashboard, which looks at 36 key measures and drivers of health.   

Marc Gourevitch is the Dashboard’s principal architect. He says health problems like opioid abuse and obesity are tracked on the dashboard.

“Not only looking at health itself,” says Gourevitch, “but some of the things that cause health, like housing and transportation and air quality. So we try to bring all that together.”

Nick Savchenko / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

If certain health providers and legislators get their way, Michigan's mental health system could soon be privatized.

Pretty much everyone agrees that closer coordination of mental and physical health care would be a good thing for patients.

After all, the mind is connected to the body, but just how to get there has been up for fierce debate going on two years now.

St. Martin's Press, 2017

It began with unbearable pain — an alarming development for a woman seven months pregnant.

And before too long, Dr. Rana Awdish was losing her grip on life.

While Awdish did not die, she did endure a long, tough recovery from the medical crisis that cost her the life of her unborn child.

And, as a physician who cared for patients in the intensive care unit, she learned profound lessons about how doctors and nurses practice medicine.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Almost one in seven children living in Highland Park in 2016 had high levels of lead in their blood, according to a new report from the state's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program.

The study looked at nine different cities with historically higher-than-average rates of children with elevated blood lead levels (EBLLs), including Highland Park, Detroit, Grand Rapids, Flint and Lansing.

Federal guidelines state that for children under six,  five micrograms per deciliter is considered a high blood lead level, though no amount is considered safe.

Stateside 5.2.2018

May 3, 2018

How do you know when it's time to seek mental health treatment? We hear that answer today on Stateside. And, we learn the zoo community is split over the best way to lift Michigan's ban on breeding large carnivores.

Cynthia Canty / Michigan Radio

When do you know the time has come to seek mental health care? Then, where do you go? To whom do you turn?

It's a critical question in the quest for mental health and wellness, and we don't tend to think about it until there's a crisis.

Death
flickr user abarndweller / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A Detroit funeral home has been shut down after inspections found decomposing embalmed bodies, unsanitary conditions, and other violations.

The state's Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) office said Wednesday that the mortuary science license of Cantrell Funeral Home has been summarily suspended. Inspectors found “deplorable, unsanitary conditions” and deemed the funeral home “an imminent threat to the public health and safety”.

M. Eric Benbow

 


 

This story will make you think of watching CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, where police forensic investigators solve crimes.

Doctor's stethoscope
Pixabay.com

Michigan could soon require certain people to work for their Medicaid benefits. 

Steve Chrypinski / Michigan Radio

Mental illness is an issue that “knows no class, no gender, no race, no geography,” said Joe Linstroth, executive director of Stateside and host of Wednesday night’s Issues & Ale event.

He asked the audience – a full house at Jolly Pumpkin Dexter’s brewery – to raise their hands if they have a personal connection to mental health or mental illness. Most every hand went up.

United Soybean Board / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Minding Michigan is Stateside’s ongoing series exploring mental health and wellness issues in our state. Today, the focus turns to suicide.

One person in Michigan dies by suicide around every six hours, and according to the CDC, men are four times more likely to die by suicide.

The state is making a concerted effort to reach out to men through a project called Healthy Men Michigan. The goal is to promote mental wellness among men in our state aged 25-64.

Senator Debbie Stabenow
USDAgov / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow says the federal Department of Veterans Affairs has chosen a site for an expanded health clinic in Traverse City.

The Michigan Democrat says the expansion will cover about 22,000 square feet and help alleviate crowding at the existing clinic. Services provided will include primary care, women's health, disease prevention and telehealth services.

A new facility will also offer mental health, physical therapy and home-based primary care services.

Elderly woman
Borya / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A state investigation into a Kalamazoo nursing home’s plans to remove some residents has uncovered further problems there.

The state investigated the Upjohn Community Care Center after a number of complaints that residents were being forced out to accommodate the facility’s downsizing plans.

That investigation found violated laws protecting nursing home residents from eviction. It also found additional violations for “substandard quality of care.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan pharmacists are backing federal legislation to remove “gag clauses” that prevent them from telling customers how they can get their prescription drugs cheaper.

Many employer-sponsored health plans and insurance companies use “gag clauses” to prevent pharmacists from telling a patient they would be charged more for a drug under the patient’s plan than if the patient paid out-of-pocket.

Elderly woman
Borya / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

How do you know if nursing homes, home health aides, and assisted living communities are treating you or your loved ones properly, and what do you do if they're not?

We'll have that conversation on Stateside soon, but first we need your questions.

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