WUOMFM

Medicaid work requirement

child coloring with crayons
Unsplash / Aaron Burden

Today on Stateside, we hear from Kalamazoo’s city manager about the response to protests over homelessness in the city. Plus, parents aren’t the only ones with long lists of school supplies to buy before the year starts—teachers are spending their own money on classroom essentials, too.

City manager addresses protests over homelessness in Kalamazoo

person getting their blood pressure taken
Unsplash

This election year, Stateside is doing some quick interviews on one topic with the candidates running for governor. You can find all our coverage of the gubernatorial race here

Today, we’re talking about Medicaid work requirements and the future of the Healthy Michigan Plan, which is the state-run Medicaid expansion.

 Reimund Holzhey mugshot
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, after a contentious city council meeting, Kalamazoo is moving to meet the demands of homeless protestors camped out in a downtown park. Plus, nationally-recognized teacher Matinga Ragatz talks about why she thinks school reform is hurting, not helping, students.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Two new studies suggest Medicaid work requirement proposals will end up kicking off qualified people from the health care program.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new University of Michigan study finds expanded Medicaid coverage is increasing access to family planning and birth control for poor women in Michigan.

Michigan expanded its Medicaid program in 2014 as part of the Affordable Care Act.   In all, 32 states and the District of Columbia have expanded Medicaid programs under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

More than 600,000 Michiganders receive health care coverage through the Healthy Michigan program.  

governor snyder at podium
Gov. Snyder signs Medicaid bill last month / Facebook

Last week, a federal judge blocked the State of Kentucky from the requiring low-income people to work in order to qualify for Medicaid.

In Michigan last month, Governor Snyder signed a similar bill. It requires all able-bodied Medicaid recipients work, or possibly lose their Medicaid benefits.

So how will the Kentucky decision impact the fate of Michigan's law?

Doctor's stethoscope
Pixabay.com

The Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation says Michigan's new Medicaid work requirements will affect the nearly 700,000 people dependent on the Healthy Michigan Plan for health insurance once they go into effect in January 2020.

Unless they receive an exemption, people will be required to work an average of 80 hours a month to receive the health insurance services. Activities such as full-time school and drug treatment programs also qualify as work under the policy.

michigan state capitol building
Brian Charles Watson / wikimedia commons

The Michigan Legislature has officially begun its summer vacation. Before they left, legislators considered a number of complicated issues, including Medicaid work requirements and school safety proposals. 

To sort out the latest from the state capitol, Michigan Radio’s Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with Rick Pluta, the Lansing bureau chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network.


Emergency room hospital
Pixabay.com / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

A work requirement for some people on Medicaid in Michigan is on the verge of becoming law. The Senate sent the bill to Governor Rick Snyder’s desk today, and despite earlier reluctance he's now signaling his support for the plan.

michigan.gov

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder says he and a key lawmaker have conceptually agreed on a plan to impose work or training requirements for Medicaid recipients, but some details are still being worked out.

The Republican governor told The Associated Press Thursday there's been a "meeting of the minds" and "we're in a pretty good place."

He confirms previous comments from Sen. Mike Shirkey - the bill sponsor - that a proposed 29-hour work requirement would instead be 20 hours.

huntlh / pixabay

Four patient-care organizations have come out in opposition to a bill that would create work requirements for Medicaid recipients.

In a written statement, the Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, and Leukemia & Lymphoma Society said three-quarters of Medicaid recipients already work.

“For a variety of reasons a chronically ill person may not be able to meet that work requirement and then they may lose coverage of what, in many cases, is life saving coverage," said Sarah Poole with the American Heart Association. 

http://www.senatormikeshirkey.com/

After scathing criticism of a proposed Medicaid work requirement many saw as racist, the lawmaker behind the plan is backing off.

Under the plan, people who live in Michigan counties with more than 8.5 percent unemployment would've been exempt from the work rule.  Those are rural, mostly white counties.