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Michigan State University

Larry Nassar
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

The same day that Michigan State University’s Title IX office cleared Larry Nassar of sexual abuse in July of 2014, a confidential version of the school’s report was sent to both Nassar and his boss, Dr. William Strampel, who has since stepped down as Dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Michigan State names acting president

Jan 26, 2018

Michigan State University has named its vice president to serve as acting president in the wake of Lou Ann Simon's resignation over the Larry Nassar sex abuse scandal.

MSU Athletic Director Mark Hollis steps down

Jan 26, 2018

Michigan State University Athletic Director Mark Hollis has stepped down in the wake of the Larry Nassar sexual abuse scandal.

The "Sparty" statue on the MSU campus
Betsy Weber / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

I’ve been wondering aloud for more than a year why the Larry Nassar case was not getting national attention. Well, it finally did, and it wasn’t pretty.

Dr. Nassar pled guilty to sexually assaulting ten girls and young women. But his victims numbered more than 100, many of them athletes at Michigan State University.

Let’s be clear: Michigan State is not merely a good school. It is a world-class research university. Everyone I know who went there loved it.

Michigan State University sign
MSU

   

 

Sue Carter has been on the faculty at Michigan State University’s School of Journalism since 1991.

 

Until yesterday, she also served as the MSU Faculty Athletic Representative.

 

Carter resigned that position just hours after Larry Nassar was sentenced, and just hours before President Simon resigned.

MISPARTAN IMPACT / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Matt Friedman is co-founder of Tanner-Friedman, a Michigan-based public relations firm. He's worked with universities in the past, and says Lou Anna Simon's resignation letter has accomplished a PR first: it's worsened MSU's crisis.

Morgan McCaul
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

“But alas, Larry, you are merely a symptom of a sickness which plagues the very core of Michigan State University, threatening every little girl who steps foot on that campus. A culture of sexual abuse, and the perverse, deliberate inaction to hold predators accountable.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

We should find out next week how Michigan’s attorney general plans to investigate Michigan State University’s handling of the Larry Nassar affair.

The former MSU doctor was sentenced this week to a minimum of 40 years in prison for sexually assaulting young women seeking care for sports injuries. 

Lou Anna Simon
MiSpartan Impact / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon has resigned.

In a letter sent to the MSU Board of Trustees Wednesday night, Simon described her commitment to putting MSU first.

File photo / Michigan State University

Michigan State University faculty are now talking about a vote of no confidence in President Lou Anna Simon.

David Jesse, a reporter with the Detroit Free Press, wrote an article yesterday headlined, “Most Michigan State trustees quiet during calls for Simon’s resignation; faculty weighs in.” (Trustee Dianne Byrum joined Mitch Lyons in calling for Simon's resignation after this segment was recorded.)

Larry Nassar
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Holt Public Schools says it's planning an investigation and remedial action, after at least one victim of former USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University sports doctor Larry Nassar says she was assaulted on Holt school property.

Abigail Mealy says she started seeing Nassar for treatment after an injury left her with severe back pain. She was among more than 150 women and girls who addressed Nassar during his week-long sentencing hearing.

Larry Nassar in court in recent months with his attorneys, Shannon Smith and Matthew Newburg.
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio

UPDATE 12:30 p.m.:
In the NCAA's letter to MSU Athletic Director Mark Hollis, Executive Vice President of Regulatory Affairs and Strategic Partnerships Oliver Luck says, "Larry Nassar's heinous crimes of record against more than 150 victims raise serious concerns about institutional practices, student-athlete safety and the institution's actions to protect individuals from his behavior."

Nassar in court.
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio

Dr. Larry Nassar, a former athletic doctor at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison today.  He pled guilty to seven counts of sexual assault in Ingham County court last November.

Last summer Nassar also pled guilty to federal charges for possessing thousands of images of child pornography. More than 120 women and girls tell MSU police that Nassar sexually abused them under the guise of treatment.

Nassar was fired from MSU in September 2016. The university has hired attorneys to investigate who knew what about the allegations against Nassar.

MSU says it has no plans to release that internal review.

Meanwhile, lawsuits against Nassar and the university allege that MSU officials have been receiving reports of abuse since 1999.

Larry Nassar in court with his attorneys, Shannon Smith and Matthew Newburg.
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio

USA Gymnastics’ top board members have resigned. Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon is being pressured to resign. And there are calls for reviews and investigations into how a sports doctor could sexually abuse girls and women for so long, while no one was aware or willing to speak up.

How could these adults and these institutions fail so many children?

larry nassar in court
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio

 

While the sentencing hearing of Larry Nassar continues, the top leadership of the board of directors at USA Gymnastics resigned today. The chair, vice chair, and treasurer are all out.  

And there are more demands for the resignation of Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon. While the MSU Board of Trustees last Friday again stated support for Simon, one trustee, Mitch Lyons, has broken with the rest of the board. He says Simon has lost the confidence of the public.

John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio sports commentator, joined Stateside to discuss some of the issues facing the university.

Bailey Lorencen hugs Rachel Denhollander
Cheyna Roth / Michigan Radio

One week ago, state prosecutor Angela Polivaitis announced that 88 women and girls would give victim impact statements in the sentencing hearing of disgraced sports doctor Larry Nassar.

Now the prosecution says that number has risen to 144, and more may decide to speak before the sentence is announced this week.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio/NPR

Michigan State University and Flint officials are kicking off a campaign to get people exposed to the city’s lead-tainted water to sign up for a special registry.

Tens of thousands of people who drank Flint tap water since 2014 have likely been exposed to lead.

The Flint Registry being launched this week is a way to connect people with resources aimed at minimizing the negative health effects of lead, as well as programs promoting wellness.

Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon
File photo / Michigan State University

Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon is facing mounting pressure to resign over how the university handled complaints against former sports Dr. Larry Nassar. The full leadership of the state Legislature, MSU's student newspaper and MSU's student government have all called for her resignation. However, it doesn't look like Simon is going anywhere at the moment.

This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about what could be keeping Simon from stepping down.


Aly Raisman
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Today is the fourth day of a sentencing hearing for Larry Nassar, the former Michigan State University sports doctor charged with sexually assaulting young girls and women under the guise of medical treatment.

MSU board announces its support of MSU president Lou Anna K. Simon.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

The Michigan State University Board of Trustees held a closed door meeting Friday (Jan. 19). They looked at the school’s response to the Larry Nassar case.

Some Michigan lawmakers have been calling for the resignation of MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon. This was a developing story. We added updates as they came in.

Knowing when to go

Jan 19, 2018
MSU President Lou Anna Simon
Bike Ann Arbor / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

I do not know Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon very well, but I did know her predecessor, Peter McPherson, whom she served as provost.

Once, I asked him how long a university president should stay in office. McPherson’s hero, the legendary John Hannah, had been MSU’s president for 27 years, and transformed the school from a small mostly agricultural college into a huge “megaversity.”

McPherson said the ideal was to leave one year before people wanted you to, so that in coming years, they would say “I wish President X would have stayed around for another year?” rather than, “thank God, at least Old X is finally gone.”

Larry Nassar
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

The Michigan State University Board of Trustees and President Lou Anna Simon have asked Attorney General Bill Schuette to open an independent review of how MSU handled complaints against disgraced sports doctor Larry Nassar.

MSU President Lou Anna Simon
Bike Ann Arbor / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon wanted to “personally” provide state lawmakers an overview of how the public institution is responding to the “issues surrounding the terrible crimes committed by former MSU physician Larry Nassar."

On January 10, the week before Nassar is sentenced for sexual abuse, Simon wrote that she wanted to give lawmakers a heads up that they “will likely continue to hear a variety of allegations and accusations against the university.”

MSU President Lou Anna Simon
File photo / MSU

The entire leadership of the state Legislature has now called for Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon to resign or be removed in the wake of the Larry Nassar scandal.

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

The sentencing hearing for former sports doctor Larry Nassar continues for a third day in an Ingham County courtroom today.

Reporter Kate Wells has been there all week. She joined Stateside to bring us the latest.

Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon
File photo / Michigan State University

This is the second of four days of victim impact statements in the sentencing of former MSU gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar.

Woman after woman is speaking out to condemn Nassar for sexually abusing them.

lower half of gymnast on balance beam
Flickr user James Thomas / Creative Commons

About 140 women and girls have accused former sports doctor Larry Nassar of sexually assaulting them while he worked for Michigan State University and the U.S. women's Olympic gymnastics team. More than 80 women and girls are scheduled to speak this week at his sentencing hearing. 

Senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry tells Morning Edition host Doug Tribou about what has stood out to him so far about the victims' statements. 

Kyle Stephens
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

For hours, they kept stepping before the court, one after another, more than two dozen women and girls speaking directly to the man who sexually abused them as children.

“I’ve been coming for you for a long time,” Kyle Stephens told Larry Nassar, her mother crying beside her.

Eat Pomegranate Photography / Courtesy of the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum

 

 

Two iconic Michigan artists are in the spotlight, thanks to an important exhibition at the Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University.

 

The works of Jim Shaw and the late Mike Kelley are being displayed in an exhibition at the MSU Broad called "Michigan Stories: Mike Kelley and Jim Shaw." It is running through February 25th.

 

Michigan State University sign
MSU

It’s going to be another news-packed week in the case of Larry Nassar, the former USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University sports doctor who sexually abused patients under the guise of treatment.

Nassar will be back in state court Tuesday, where he’ll be sentenced after pleading guilty to multiple sexual assaults. Some 88 women and girls are expected to make victim impact statements. But before that, here’s what you need to know about how Michigan State University is handling the case.

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