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Michiganders can now legally buy recreational marijuana. Here’s what you need to know.

Al McWilliams and Gordie Garwood
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Dungeons & Dragons is having a cultural revival, and not just in Hawkins. In Ann Arbor, the tabletop fantasy roleplaying game is being played regularly by all kinds of people — including those nerdy kids-now-adults that played it in the 1970s and 80s.

Kids like Al McWilliams. When he heard a friend was playing D&D, McWilliams recalls, he instantly wanted in.

John Auchter

Every once is a while I come up with a cartoon that says all I have to say about a topic, so I don't really have any backstory or additional commentary. I'm just truly mystified.

Pet coke piles on Detroit riverfront in 2013.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

A Windsor politician is calling for a bi-national investigation - and an environmental group is calling for the restoration of Michigan's "Polluter Pay" laws.

That's after part of a property owned by Detroit Bulk Storage collapsed into the Detroit River last week.  The collapse is initially being blamed on the weight of massive piles of sand, gravel and other construction materials the company is storing on site.

Group of men sitting on a hill
U.S. Library of Congress

Today on Stateside, an old industrial site contaminated with uranium since the World War II has partially collapsed into the Detroit River. Plus, a group of West Michigan musicians have brought old Michigan folk songs once sung by sailors and lumberjacks back to life.

water faucet
Flickr user Bart / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

New bills in the state House would put Michigan’s water – including groundwater – in a public trust. That means that the waters would have to be reserved for the public’s use, and the state would have to protect the water for that purpose.

Gov. Whitmer names law professor to MSU Board of Trustees

20 hours ago
https://www.michiganstateuniversityonline.com/about/michigan-state/

A University of Houston Law Center professor who spent more than ten years at Michigan State University has been appointed to the MSU Board of Trustees.

Michigan State Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The Republican-led Legislature has passed legislation that would restore more than half of the proposed spending that was vetoed by Democratic Governor Gretchen Whitmer.

The votes are a sign that Michigan's budget impasse may soon end.

A spokeswoman for Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey says there has been "significant progress" in talks, though no deal.

The Senate and House approved bills on Wednesday to reverse 27 of Whitmer's 147 line-item vetoes and some of her fund transfers.

washed away dunes and a deck perched on the edge
Courtesy of Jim Davlin

Today on Stateside, Great Lakes water levels are at record or near-record highs, leading to dramatic shoreline erosion and threatening lakeshore properties. Plus, the Detroit origins of the spiral cut ham, a holiday dinner staple. 

Gretchen Driskell
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Former Saline Mayor Gretchen Driskell announced her candidacy Wednesday for the United States House of Representatives, seeking to represent Michigan’s 7th Congressional District.

It's the third time Driskell has run against incumbant Republican Congressman Tim Walberg, now in his sixth term of office in the U.S. House.

Denise had no idea her student loans could be erased. In 2007, a truck rear-ended her car. The accident ravaged her legs and back, and the pain made it impossible for her to work.

"I have basically been in pain — chronic pain — every day," says Denise, who asked that NPR not use her full name to protect her privacy. "I live a life of going to doctors constantly."

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Life on the Inside: Stories from a Michigan prison

Stateside’s week-long series will capture what life is like for the people who live and work inside Lakeland Correctional Facility.

Donate to Michigan Radio during our membership drive, then choose a thank you gift.

Join our "Cheers" hosts for this celebration of Michigan craft cocktails

From the Archive

They were forced off their land. Their homes burned. 118 years later, their descendants fight on.

Thank you to our food donors!