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Criminal Justice & Legal System

The House Jan. 6 committee holds its fifth major public hearing

People gather in a park outside of the U.S. Capitol to watch the Jan. 6 House committee investigation hearing on Thursday night. The panel will next meet on Monday at 10 a.m.
Jose Luis Magana
/
AP
People gather in a park outside of the U.S. Capitol to watch the Jan. 6 House committee investigation hearing on Thursday night. The panel will next meet on Monday at 10 a.m.

Updated June 13, 2022 at 9:28 AM ET

The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection is holding a series of public hearings this month on what it has learned so far. The second is Monday morning. The panel announced Monday that former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien will no longer appear as a witness "due to a family emergency" and that the hearing will be delayed 30-45 minutes from its scheduled 10 a.m. start time.

The committee says Stepien's counsel will appear and make a statement.

Monday's hearing will focus on Trump's efforts to perpetuate the lie that widespread fraud had stolen the election from him even though he already knew he had lost. The committee says Trump's disinformation campaign directly led to the Jan. 6 riot.

Watch it live here:

"Ultimately, Donald Trump, the president of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down to the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Thompson said at the committee's first public hearing in prime time Thursday night.

Catch up on what happened during the first hearing here.

Republicans, meanwhile, have blasted the committee's work as illegitimate as Trump called the House committee investigation a "hoax" and continued to push his false narrative about election fraud.

In addition to Stepien's lawyer, the panel will hear from four witnesses. It's the second in what are expected to be seven committee hearings throughout June.

The panel is expected to release its findings in a report in September. It has interviewed more than 1,000 witnesses, publicly subpoenaed about 100 individuals, including members of Congress, and collected evidence like documents, texts and emails over nearly 11 months as part of its investigation into what happened the day of the Capitol insurrection and what led to it.

For the latest updates on Monday's hearing head over to NPR's live blog. NPR will also broadcast live special coverage of the hearings. Find your local member station or use the NPR One app to listen.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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