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Environment & Climate Change
Asian carp have been making their way up the Mississippi River system for years after escaping from fish farms and wastewater treatment ponds in the southern U.S.They’re knocking on the door of the Great Lakes, and a number of people are concerned about what could happen if carp become established in the region.In this five-part series, we’ll take a look at what officials are trying to do to keep the fish out, what might happen if carp get in, and why some people want to turn carp into a business opportunity.

Great Lakes governors closer to agreement on Asian carp

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Illinois Dept of Natural Resources
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The Great Lakes governors are meeting this weekend on Mackinac Island.

There may have been a small breakthrough on a plan to deal with the threat of Asian carp spreading into the lakes.

There’s been some tension among the Great Lakes states over what to about Asian carp spreading from the Mississippi River system to Lake Michigan.

The two join at a shipping canal in Chicago. The Great Lakes Council of Governors agreed to adopt a common strategy to fight the spread of invasive species.

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn endorsed the concept of sealing off the Great Lakes from the Mississippi.

“Ultimately, we have to separate the basins,” says Quinn, “That’s a major, huge public works project for America. I really feel that is the ultimate solution.”

Quinn says a lot more study is needed still to determine the best way do that and how to pay the multi-billion dollar cost. There’s disagreement, though, on even going ahead with that.

Indiana Governor Mike Pence says the disruption would destroy thousands of Hoosier jobs.

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