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In July 1967, five days of chaos erupted in Detroit. Citizens, police, and troops clashed in a violent conflict that left 43 people dead, thousands of buildings destroyed, and a lingering scar on the once-vibrant city. It was a pivotal moment for Detroit, and for the country.Today, many believe Detroit is having a renaissance. And there have been plenty of visible improvements in recent years.But for many Detroiters, little has changed for the better in the past half-century. Poverty is even more entrenched. There are few good jobs and even fewer good schools. Blight and foreclosure have erased entire neighborhoods.If we want to understand today’s Detroit, we have to consider the city’s turbulent past. That’s why Michigan Radio is revisiting the events of that hot summer in 1967.From July 17-28, Stateside and Morning Edition will hear from people who were there; explore the issues that led to the deadliest riot of the 1960s; and examine why it still resonates in the city today.

VIDEO: A look back at the roots of Detroit's 1967 uprising

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Walter P. Reuther Library: Wayne State University.
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The causes of the 1967 rebellion go back almost to the city's founding.

 
For one hot week fifty years ago, Detroit burned.

Now, when most people think of the uprising, they picture the aftermath: burnt and abandoned buildings, looted businesses, a city in decline.

But the uprising was not a random event. Rather, it was the result of a city fraught with racial tension, population decline, and deindustrialization.

Watch the video above to learn more about the policies, attitudes, and events that caused the Motor City to explode in 1967.

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