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Stateside: Lawmakers move to undo Whitmer vetoes; UAW corruption; subscription health care

An open book that says "Veto" in red stamped with red ink pad next to it
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Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the Republican-controlled legislature continue to clash over the state budget, which Whitmer approved after issuing 147 line-item vetoes.

Today on Stateside, an update on the latest from Lansing as state House and Senate Republicans try to undo some of Governor Whitmer's 147 line-item vetoes. Plus, a former UAW official calls on the union to clean house.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

State budget showdown "could get a lot worse" as GOP leaders, Gov. Whitmer battle over spending

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Stateside’s conversation with Zach Gorchow

  • There’s movement in Lansing to undo some of Governor Whitmer’s 147 line-item vetoes to the state budget she signed last week. Zach Gorchow is with Gongwer News Service. He broke down which programs Republican lawmakers do, and do not, want to see funding restored for. He also talks about what might come out of Governor Whitmer’s upcoming meeting with the four top legislative leaders.  

Locals worry erosion could cause chemical spill in Michigan's Pere Marquette River

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Click above to hear Interlochen Public Radio’s Taylor Wizner’s reporting

  • The land beneath the railroad tracks along the Pere Marquette River in Baldwin is eroding into the river. Locals are concerned about a derailment, but the company that owns the railroad tracks says that won’t happen anytime soon. Interlochen Public Radio’s Taylor Wizner brought us this story.

UAW needs to clean ship and hold itself accountable, says former union PR director 

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Stateside’s conversation with Frank Joyce

  • The UAW strike against General Motors is now in its 23rd day. As 48,000 workers continue walking picket lines around the country, the cloud of the ongoing federal corruption probe hangs over the bargaining table.
  • Frank Joyce is the former director of public relations for the UAW from 1990 to 2002. He recently published an op-ed in the Detroit Free Press arguing that the UAW has “completely lost its way in respect to mission and purpose.” Joyce explained why he felt the need to speak out, and what he thinks it will take to get more transparency from union leadership.

Theater Talk: Michigan ghost stories, musical classics, plus Rocky Horror Picture Show

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Stateside’s conversation with David Kiley

  • It’s that time of year to get into the spirit of Halloween. David Kiley of Encore Michigan has a list of productions coming to a theater near you to help usher in the spooky season. He told us about Haunted at the Ypsilanti Experimental Space, Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express at the Meadow Brook Theater in Rochester Hills, and Rocky Horror Picture Show at the Barn Theatre in Augusta.
  • Support for arts and culture coverage comes in part from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.

Subscribe to your doctor? A new model for medical care is catching doctors’ attention

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Stateside’s conversation with Matt Falkiewicz and Marianne Udow-Phillips

  • Some physicians are rejecting the traditional, insurance-based model of healthcare in favor of alternatives like direct primary care, which offers patients “almost unlimited access” to their primary care doctors in exchange for a monthly fee and no co-pays.
  • Dr. Matt Falkiewicz is a physician with Nova Direct Primary Care in Grand Rapids. He explained why he chose to open a direct primary care practice, and how he thinks both patients and physicians can benefit from that model.
  • Marianne Udow-Phillips is director of the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation at the University of Michigan. She broke down what services direct primary care doesn’t cover, why it may not be the best choice with those who don’t have extra disposable income, and why she thinks that the model appeals to some physicians.

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