Colin Dwyer | Michigan Radio
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Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the News Desk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

A New Jersey man has been charged with making terroristic threats after allegedly coughing in the direction of a local supermarket employee and claiming he suffered from the coronavirus. The state's attorney general, Gurbir Grewal, announced the charges against George Falcone on Tuesday.

Here's how his office explains what happened at a Wegmans supermarket on Sunday evening:

In a bid to stem the tide of the coronavirus, India has declared the world's largest stay-at-home order yet in the fight against the global pandemic.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi declared a 21-day lockdown during an address to the country Tuesday, instructing its more than 1.3 billion residents to stay right where they are, beginning at midnight Tuesday night.

The Norwegian Jewel set out from Australia late last month on a jaunt through the South Pacific. Now, just one day from its journey's original end date, the cruise ship has found itself turned away from multiple ports, and its more than 2,000 passengers are beginning to fear there may not be an end in sight.

Come Friday, few places will show the effects of the coronavirus more vividly than mosques across the world — not so much for what will be there, as what won't: Friday prayers have been curtailed or outright suspended in more than a dozen majority-Muslim countries across the world.

The list of countries to close mosques to mass gatherings or issue widespread bans includes Turkey and Lebanon, Iraq and Egypt, Jordan and Malaysia — along with a growing collection of others.

Australia and New Zealand are shutting their doors to foreigners.

In separate announcements issued Friday, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said that visitors who are not residents or citizens of their respective countries will soon be turned away at the border — beginning Friday night in Australia, and even sooner in New Zealand.

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

The U.S. hit a grim milestone in its fight against the coronavirus, as the number of confirmed cases pushed past the 10,000 mark. As of Thursday afternoon, officials reported more than 10,750 confirmed cases of the COVID-19 viral disease — and over 150 deaths.

In a surprise move, the NCAA says it intends to allow college athletes to earn compensation — but it says it's only starting to work out the details of how that would take place. The organization's board of governors said Tuesday that it had voted unanimously to permit student-athletes to benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness.

When President Trump tweeted his racist remarks Sunday, asking why certain Democratic congresswomen don't just "go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came," he did not just take aim at the four women of color — three of whom were born in the U.S.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The National Mall has flooded with pink, as demonstrators descend on the nation's capital Saturday for the Women's March on Washington. Just one day after President Trump's inauguration, marchers from across the country have gathered in the city to protest his agenda and support for women's rights.

The event opened with a rally, to be followed by the march proper — which had a path laid out from a starting position near the U.S. Capitol to its endpoint near the Washington Monument.

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