Doug Tribou | Michigan Radio
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Doug Tribou

Host, Morning Edition

Doug Tribou joined the Michigan Radio staff as the host of Morning Edition in June 2016. Doug first moved to Michigan in 2015 when he was awarded a Knight-Wallace journalism fellowship at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

From 2006 until August 2015, Doug worked at NPR member station WBUR in Boston. During that time, he spent seven years as a reporter and producer for Only A Game, NPR’s weekly sports show. From 2006 to 2008, he was a news anchor at WBUR.

Doug’s reporting has appeared on All Things Considered, Marketplace, and Weekend Edition. He has also made numerous appearances on NPR’s Here and Now.

Doug also has extensive experience in commercial radio. He served as program director at ESPN Radio Boston (WAMG/WLLH) from 2005 to 2006, and as program and news director for stations owned by Saga Communications in Portland, Maine.

Doug has a bachelor’s degree in broadcast journalism from Syracuse University. In 2013, he earned a master’s degree in advertising from Boston University.

Doug lives with his wife and two daughters in Ann Arbor. In his spare time, he enjoys exploring Michigan with his family, basketball, running, golf, books about history, and detective novels.

You can follow Doug on Twitter @DougTribou.

As protests over racial injustice in the U.S. continue, Major League Baseball is honoring an institution created 100 years ago because of its own racist past. The Negro Leagues showcased Black baseball players when they were banned from the big leagues.

MLB had to reschedule a celebration of the leagues' centennial originally set for June because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The number of Negro Leaguers left to celebrate is dwindling. The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City, Mo., estimates there are about 100 players still living.

entrance to Comerica Park
Cacophony / Wikimedia Commons

One prediction about the Tigers' 2020 season is a sure thing. It will be like no other season baseball fans have ever seen. 

Detroit will play its first game of the shortened campaign Friday night in Cincinnati against the Reds.   

In addition to a schedule cut from 162 games to 60, the Tigers will be playing under a host of new rules designed to limit the spread of COVID-19. They include limited seating in the dugouts, and a ban on spitting and high-fives.

Michigan radio sports commentator John U. Bacon says MLB is getting it right when it comes to safety.

senior couple holding hands, wearing backpacks
pasja1000 / Pixabay

A joke about how to use a smartphone. A wink between colleagues about a current pop culture reference. Unneeded help with routine tasks.

Those are some of the ways older people experience ageism. 

The University of Michigan looked at bias against older people and other quality of life issues in its National Poll on Healthy Aging, which has just been released.

A maroon 1955 Lincoln Continental
Ken Fischang / Gilmore Car Museum

Ford Motor Company announced this week that it is ending production of one its most famous cars: the Lincoln Continental. Ford will stop manufacturing the luxury sedan at its Flat Rock Assembly Plant at the end of this year.

empty baseball stadium
Simon Johnson

For a time with very few sporting events, it's been a very busy week for sports news. Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon shared his thoughts on bringing back sports during the COVID-19 crisis and the Detroit Lions' ownership change.

kid on swing
Myles Tan / Unsplash

School's out for summer, though that change may seem less significant when your kids have already been home from school for months. With many camps and vacation plans on the scrap heap this year, keeping your kids' mental health – and your own – in check may take some extra work this summer.

dumpster on fire with protesters gathered around it
Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

The death of George Floyd in Minneapolis prompted large protests in Grand Rapids. But Grand Rapids has its own history of troubling interactions between police and residents. Now the city is having tough conversations about the future of policing there.

screenshot of TouTube video of students playing instruments
Monroe High School

Michigan schools are wrapping up a year like no other. As COVID-19 closed K-12 buildings, teachers and students struggled to recreate the chemistry of some group activities.

Downtown Ann Arbor
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

Starting Monday, Michigan’s restaurants and bars can reopen to dine-in customers at half capacity. Business districts have welcomed the news, but as customers return, there are also concerns about spreading COVID-19.

Traverse City recently voted to close two blocks downtown to vehicle traffic to allow for more outdoor seating. And last week, the Ann Arbor City Council passed its own plan for some downtown streets.

A long table surrounded by red chairs in a school classroom.
BES Photos / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

For many people in Michigan, one of the most pressing issues during the coronavirus pandemic is how to handle K-12 education. Parents and kids are still navigating the final weeks of this school year, but there are major questions about what will be possible in the fall.

Michigan's State Superintendent of Public Instruction Michael Rice spoke with Michigan Radio's Morning Edition about the posssibilities and concerns. 

Woman looking at closed window blinds
Needpix / Needpix

For many people, staying at home has provided some sense of safety during the coronavirus pandemic. But for Michigan residents who live under the threat of domestic violence, staying home during an especially stressful time feels anything but safe.

Shelters that take in victims and their children are trying to protect their guests on multiple levels right now. People fearing abuse at home arrive at shelters where group settings present an increased risk of COVID-19 exposure.

man welding, sparks
Daniel Wiadro / Unsplash

Picture this: you're going to college half-time and working half-time - at a low-paying job - to get by. Then a global crisis hits and you lose that part-time job. Soon, you realize you need help from the state to get food on the table, but to qualify you have to drop out of school.

Some Michigan college students had been facing that dilemma until a rule change that was announced Tuesday. 

Looking up into the rotunda of the Michigan Capitol.
user cedarbenddrive/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Some intense scenes played out at the state Capitol in Lansing Thursday. Armed demonstrators stood in the Senate gallery and angry protesters tried to demand access to the House chambers. All of this was driven by tensions over Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic.

Speaker of the Michigan House of Representatives Lee Chatfield joined Michigan Radio's Morning Edition host Doug Tribou to talk about the protests and the political impasse between Whitmer and Republican legislators.

close up of cross inlay on front of church
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

United States Attorney General William Barr issued a memo on Monday instructing U.S. attorneys to watch for state and local orders tied to the COVID-19 pandemic that could be violating the constitutional rights of citizens. Barr named the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, Matthew Schneider, as one of two people to oversee that process. He spoke to Michigan Radio's Morning Edition host Doug Tribou.

msu beaumont tower
Wikimedia Commons

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security – or CARES – Act, signed into law by President Donald Trump in March included nearly $14 billion in emergency relief funding for higher education. Michigan State University is slated to receive more than $29.8 million, the most of any individual campus in the state.

married couple smiling with sign
Bryce Huffman

Big weddings are out during the coronavirus pandemic shutdown in Michigan. So, one bride and groom scaled down their plans when they got married earlier this month in Detroit.

Michigan Radio reporter Bryce Huffman was there to see it because his brother was the groom. Bryce said his brother and new sister-in-law, Eric and Naomi Huffman, had big plans when they first got engaged.

john u. bacon running with friends
Christie Bacon

Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon had Monday April 20, circled on his calendar for a long, long time. Before COVID-19 hit, that was the date of the Boston Marathon, and John was supposed to be in it. The marathon is on hold, so John came up with an alternative: he drew up his own 26.2 mile course in Ann Arbor and invited people to cheer him on – at a distance – over the weekend.

Congressman Justin Amash
Facebook

West Michigan Congressman Justin Amash is considering a run for president. This week, Amash revealed that he has paused his Congressional reelection campaign while he considers running for the White House.

Libertarian columnist Shikha Dalmia joined Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou to talk about Amash's possible run and personal liberties in the time of stay-home orders. 

bible and torah
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

This is a holy time for believers in both the Jewish and Christian faiths, but the traditional worship services and gatherings associated with Passover and Easter aren’t following their traditional format this year.

Rabbi Amy Bigman leads Congregation Shaarey Zedek in East Lansing, and Rev. Solomon Kinloch Jr. is the senior pastor at Triumph Church in Detroit. They spoke with Michigan Radio’s Morning Edition host Doug Tribou about worship in the time of COVID-19

A long table surrounded by red chairs in a school classroom.
BES Photos / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has issued an executive order ending face-to-face instruction for the current school year. But Whitmer also wants kids to move forward.

“What we want to make sure is that no student is penalized because of COVID-19, that they are not held back because of this global crisis that we’re confronting,” Whitmer said in a press conference Thursday.

Lisa Hagel is superintendent of the Genesee Intermediate School District. She spoke with Michigan Radio’s Doug Tribou about how the new order will affect students and families.

In Michigan, parents of school-aged children are now in the third consecutive week with their kids out of school. For many, there's a daily mish-mash of video calls with teachers or friends, homemade lesson plans, and a touch of cabin fever ... all while trying to work from home.

For tips on helping your family navigate all of that, we turned to Dr. Jenny Radesky. She's a developmental behavioral pediatrician, researcher, and professor at the University of Michigan. 

hospital room
Dan Stevens / Pexels

With a surge of COVID-19 patients beginning at some hospitals here in Michigan, healthcare workers on the front lines of the outbreak may soon have to make some tough decisions about serving their patients, and protecting their co-workers, families, and themselves.

governor whitmer
State of Michigan

As of 12:01 a.m. Tuesday, Michigan is under an official stay-at-home order. People are allowed to go outside for exercise and for essential activities like grocery shopping and medical appointments.

But, the order requires non-essential businesses to close any of their in-person operations and prohibits any gatherings with people who aren’t members of your household.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced the order Monday.  It lasts until April 13. She joined Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou to discuss its scope and other effects of the coronvirus pandemic.

child swinging
Olivia Bauso / unsplash

The new coronavirus is making child care complicated. For some people working from home, it turns into an iPad while they're on a conference call. But people who simply have to go to work still need reliable, safe child care.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed an executive order Wednesday to ease child care licensing restrictions with the goal making more care available to health care providers and other essential workers.

empty classroom
Adobe Stock

This week school districts across the state are adapting to a new normal: Governor Gretchen Whitmer has closed all K-12 schools in Michigan until April 6 in an effort to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke to Detroit Public Schools Community District Superintendent Nikolai Vitti about how the district is responding.

Commerica Park
MJCdetroit/Wikimedia Commons

The domino effect of the novel coronavirus has been on full display in the world of sports in past couple of days. After an NBA player tested positive for COVID-19, the league suspended its season. Since then, the NCAA has called off its men's and women's basketball tournaments. The NHL suspended its season. And Major League Baseball canceled the rest of spring training and has delayed Opening Day by at least two weeks.

Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with Jon Morosi about the ripple effects. Morosi covers baseball for MLB Network and Fox Sports. He also reports for the NHL Network and is a native Michigander.

Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders speaking into separate microphones
Gage Skidmore / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

Michigan is a large, diverse state, and presidential candidates have been courting minority voters here in the days leading up to Tuesday’s primaries.

For a closer look at the influence of minority populations in this election cycle, Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with Michigan State University political science professor Nazita Lajevardi.

GOP elephant, Dem donkey
Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

Political parties usually love to get voters to switch to their side, but sometimes they’d just as soon have them stay put.

Primaries can be a time of political tricks by party loyalists who switch their stripes for a day in order to influence the other party's results.

ballot
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Michiganders will head to the polls on March 10. Predictably the presidential primaries are getting all kinds of attention, but across the state, residents will also vote on 245 local ballot proposals.

Jonathan Oosting is the Michigan politics reporter for Bridge Magazine, and recently wrote about what else is on ballots around the state.

Minnie Forbes sitting on a couch
Doug Tribou / Michigan Radio

Grand Rapids isn't a big-league baseball town, but a living part of baseball history calls it home. 

Minnie Forbes is the last surviving owner of a Negro Leagues baseball team. She owned the Detroit Stars from 1956 to 1958. She was also one of just a handful of female owners.

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