Dustin Jones | Michigan Radio
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Dustin Jones

Dustin Jones is a reporter for NPR's digital news desk. He mainly covers breaking news, but enjoys working on long-form narrative pieces.

Jones got his start at NPR in September 2020 as the organization's first intern through a partnership with Military Veterans in Journalism. He interned as a producer for All Things Considered on the weekends, and then as a reporter for the Newsdesk.

He kickstarted his journalism career as a local reporter in Southwest Montana, just outside of Yellowstone National Park. From there he went on to study at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism where he focused on documentary production and book publication.

Jones served four years in the Marine Corps with tours to Iraq and Afghanistan. The New Hampshire native has lived all over the country, but currently resides in Southern California.

When Jones isn't writing for NPR, he is reporting for his local newspaper and freelancing as a video producer for the Military Times. Outside of work, he enjoys surfing, snowboarding and tearing up the dancefloor, sometimes all in the same day.

The doctors didn't know what to do.

Audrey, the incapacitated young woman in the ICU, had just celebrated her 29th birthday. She was physically fit and had been in perfect health. Just six months earlier, she had run a marathon with her twin sister, Kelsey. And Audrey had always been health conscious; she worked as a transplant nurse in Denver.

The medical team — nine doctors working in unison with X-ray technicians, phlebotomists and nurses — could not explain why Audrey's heart was failing.

The state of California updated its plans Friday to allow outdoor events at stadiums, ballparks and theme parks to begin to reopen April 1.

Sports facilities and amusement parks will reopen at reduced capacity, contingent on county-level infection rates. The California Department of Public Health released its Blueprint for a Safer Economy guidelines last August, which has dictated the opening and closing of businesses at the county level ever since.

For the first time since a late fall spike of COVID-19 infections, San Francisco will allow indoor dining and, gyms, movie theaters and museums to open to the public Wednesday morning.

Mayor London Breed and Grant Colfax, San Francisco Director of Health, announced the easing of coronavirus restrictions Tuesday. The changes will allow many businesses that were forced to shut last fall to reopen at some capacity, a news release said.

More California students may return to in-person learning after legislators promised $2 billion to public schools that return to campus before the end of the month.

Most of California's 6.1 million students and 319,000 teachers haven't set foot in a classroom since the pandemic shut down schools across the state last March. But Gov. Gavin Newsom worked with Senate and Assembly leaders to announce a $6.6 billion aid package Monday.

Updated at 12:59 p.m. ET Saturday

The supermarket giant Kroger Co. announced Friday that employees who receive a COVID-19 vaccine will be rewarded with a $100 bonus.

A third coronavirus vaccine candidate has requested emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration. Johnson & Johnson submitted its application Thursday for the company's single-dose inoculation.

Republican lawmakers in Wisconsin approved a joint resolution Thursday overriding Gov. Tony Evers' most recent COVID-19 state of emergency, abolishing a state-wide mask mandate. In response, Evers declared a new state of emergency. Effective immediately, Wisconsinites must again wear masks in public places.