Emma Winowiecki | Michigan Radio
WUOMFM

Emma Winowiecki

Digital Producer

Emma is a producer and reporter for the digital news team at Michigan Radio. Her duties span all things web-related, from reporting news online to producing videos to creating maps and graphics for other reporters.

A native of northern Michigan, Emma is a graduate of the University of Michigan, with a dual degree in Communication Studies and Film Studies. As such, she is a movie and TV junkie, and is always up for a game of trivia. Her other passions include reading, cooking, and taking too many pictures of her dogs: Gus and Seamus.

someone writing on a ballot
Michael Dorausch / Flickr, http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Detroit unveiled new digital voting machines to volunteers this weekend after years of faulty machines that slowed down the voting process.

The machines are a part of a statewide effort to replace all voting systems by 2018. Voting machines in Michigan have not been replaced in over a decade.

Detroit ordered 700 new machines, which will be installed before the August primaries.

Christoper Sessums / Flickr http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Crews are working to restore power to thousands of customers in Michigan after storms packing high winds, snow and heavy rain hit the state.

Authorities say Thursday's weather was a factor in at least one death. The Kalamazoo County sheriff's department says 57-year-old Kelli Roberts of Gobles died following a two-vehicle crash on snowy roads in southwestern Michigan.

Undersheriff Paul Matyas says she was going too fast for road conditions when she tried to pass a truck.

Lansing City Hall building
Michigan State Historic Preservation Office / Flickr

The Michigan and Lansing Chambers of Commerce are urging city council members to rescind a resolution which declares Lansing a "sanctuary city."

In a letter sent to the Lansing City Council Thursday, business leaders wrote that they want the declaration removed because it sends the wrong message.

Tim Daman, president and CEO of the Lansing Regional Chamber of Commerce, and Rich Studley, president and CEO of the Michigan Chamber wrote:

Demolition
Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

The city of Detroit has approved a new contract with the same company that left 19 demolition sites unfinished for more than 8 months. That work was part of the city's blight removal program, which is currently under federal investigation.

Medical Marijuana
Dank Depot / Creative Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Monroe City Council approved a decision this week to opt out of authorizing potential medical marijuana facilities. 

The council voted unanimously on the resolution. City Manager Vincent Pastue told The Monroe News that one of the reasons for the action is the lack of regulations related to marijuana facilities.

"It's difficult, if not impossible, for a community to make a land-use decision absent of these regulations."

Brian Turner / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Lawyers for dozens of women who say they were sexually assaulted by a MSU sports doctor are trying to overturn a judge's gag order.

They asked a federal judge to intervene Tuesday and strike an order that bars attorneys and Larry Nassar's alleged victims from talking publicly. Ingham County Judge Rosemarie Aquilina is overseeing a criminal case against Nassar and says his rights could be violated if the public is repeatedly served with negative comments about him.

Brian Turner / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The city of Hamtramck has settled a whistleblower lawsuit in which the city's former public works director accused officials of firing him for reporting police misconduct and racial discrimination.

Steve Shaya filed the whistleblower lawsuit against Hamtramck in February 2014, saying that he was framed in a hit-and-run in November 2013. Shaya says that he was charged with leaving the scene of the accident, after complaining about a Hamtramck police officer's violation of the city's ethics laws. Those charges were later dismissed.

Jim Brandstatter

Dr. William B. Stegath, Michigan Radio’s longest living alumnus, passed away Wednesday, just two weeks before his 97th birthday.

Bill was best known as the Voice of the Wolverines, and announced Michigan football games on WUOM from 1953 to 1962, a role only held by two other people.

In that time, Bill was the sports director at WUOM, and announced games for Michigan basketball, baseball, and hockey in addition to football games in the fall - quite literally a “U-M Man for All Seasons.”

Lance McCord / Flickr, http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services has confirmed the influenza-related deaths of two Michigan children.

Officials did not release any other additional information related to the deaths, other than one was a child in northern Michigan and the other child was in western Michigan.

In a statement, the department reiterated the importance of flu vaccinations for anyone older than six months of age.

test with bubble answers
User Alberto G. / Creative Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Michigan House has passed bills that would give high school students more class options to complete graduation requirements.

The legislation eliminates some math, science, health and English courses so students can take classes that would better prepare them for careers of their choosing.

someone getting a shot
Sanofi Pasteur / Flickr, http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is confirming the first case of measles in the state this year.

The department announced Wednesday that a person in southeastern Michigan is being hospitalized after recently traveling internationally and getting sick.

Courtesy Photo / Michigan Supreme Court

Michigan Supreme Court Justice Robert P. Young, Jr. announced today that he will retire by the end of April.

In a statement released by the court, Young says that he is proud of his accomplishments during his time as Chief Justice. 

Mark Goebel / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The longest playoff streak in the NHL officially came to an end last night after the Red Wings lost to the Carolina Hurricanes.

Detroit's playoff streak was the longest run of all four major league sports. In that time, the Wings won four Stanley Cups and six President's Cups.

The last time the Red Wings were not in the playoffs, George H.W. Bush was president, the reunification of Germany was underway, and "The Simpsons" had just aired for the first time.

Charlie Davidson / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A new Michigan law requires doctors or hospitals to report deaths of women during pregnancy or within one year of pregnancy.

The requirement starts April 6. The state has been collecting information on maternal deaths for years, but reporting was voluntary.

The goal is to understand the factors associated with the deaths in an effort to prevent more of them. The state health department says as many as 100 Michigan women a year die during pregnancy or within a year of pregnancy.

Western Michigan University's Main Campus
user TheKuLeR / Wikimedia Commons

A new survey has found that fewer international students are applying to universities in the United States.

The survey by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers says that nearly 40% of schools received fewer admissions from foreign students this year.

And lower international enrollment rates could harm universities in Michigan.

Prosecutors say a second backlog of more than 500 untested Detroit rape kits languished in storage for years after more than 11,000 other unprocessed evidence packages were discovered in 2009.

Jethro Taylor / Flickr, http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

For rural residents worried about visits from black bears this spring and summer, a wildlife expert has some advice: Take down your bird feeders, at least for now.

Katie Keen of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources says bears are particularly attracted to bird seed and suet because they have higher fat content than natural food sources such as roots of early spring plants and insect larvae.

Once a bear finds a bird feeder, it will keep coming back until the seed is gone or the feeder is removed.

User apoxapox / Flickr

Cases of hepatitis A are increasing in Detroit, as well as Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne counties.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services announced today that there has been a significant uptick in the number of lab-confirmed hepatitis A cases.

In a press release, the department said that 107 cases were confirmed from August 1, 2016 to March 1, 2017. That's eight times higher than the previous year.

needle
hitthatswitch / Creative Commons

A verdict has been reached in the trial of a Massachusetts pharmacy co-founder charged in a nationwide meningitis outbreak that killed 64 people and sickened 700 others in 2012.

Barry Cadden was charged with 25 counts of second-degree murder, conspiracy and other charges under the federal racketeering law. 

The jury determined that Cadden was not responsible for the deaths, but he was found guilty of the racketeering, conspiracy and mail fraud charges. His sentencing is scheduled for June 21.

Hemlock woolly adelgid
Michigan DNR

Insects and diseases are posing a threat to Michigan's forests.

That's according to a report released yesterday by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

The report, which is a part of the National Forest Health Monitoring Program, includes an analysis of issues that threaten Michigan's 20 million acres of forest land for 2016.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has clarified what seems to have been a misinterpretation of NAFTA law, which led to a number of Canadian nurses working in Detroit being denied work visa renewals.

The Detroit-based Henry Ford Health System raised concerns last week that some of their nurses has been denied renewals of a type of work visa called a TN visa. Canadian nurses help fill staff shortages in a number of crucial areas.

Fraser home falling into the sinkhole.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

A sinkhole in Fraser which caused three homes to be condemned will be fixed by September.

The sewer collapsed in December and has affected 11 Macomb county communities. The county has chosen Dan's Excavating to fix the damage. The company won a $33 million bid to do the repair work.

corktown sign
Robert Duffner / Wikimedia Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan’s Irish traditions go back nearly 250 years.

The first Irish immigrants largely settled on the East Coast, in large cities like Boston and New York. But they soon started heading west.

Because Detroit was founded by the French, it was an established as a Catholic city, which was attractive to many of the Irish facing persecution by Protestants back home.

michigan state university sign
Branislav Ondrasik / Wikimedia Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Around 700 faculty and staff members at Michigan State University say they will not help immigration officials that attempt to apprehend, deport, or determine the immigration status of students.

Staff members have been signing a "Statement of Solidarity," which promises to support students that want to remain in the US.

Capitol Hill
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Last week, House Republicans submitted their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

The bill, which has been under intense committee debate, has drawn criticism from Democrats, some Republicans, health care organizations, doctors, and others. But it is largely supported by House Republicans and the White House.

Some of the bill’s provisions would be enacted as soon as it is put into law, including the elimination of individual and employer mandates. Others would be delayed until 2020, such as limiting the Medicaid expansion and a repeal of subsidies for out-of-pocket expenses.

Christoper Sessums / Flickr http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Extremely high winds have caused power outages and more throughout Michigan today.

DTE, Consumer's Energy, and Great Lakes Energy are all reporting power outages due to winds that have reached up to 60 mph.

The strongest winds have been in the southeastern part of the state, but there have been challenges up north, as well. The Mackinaw Bridge is partially closed due to the winds, and the motorists that do cross are being asked to drive under 20 mph.

Waves on Lake Michigan.
user ellenm1 / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Extremely high winds will cause massive waves on Lake Michigan tonight.

The National Weather Service has issued a gale warning that predicts wind gusts with speeds up to 52 miles per hour, which could create up to 20-foot-tall waves.

The gale warning is in effect until Tuesday morning, and includes all of Lake Michigan 5 miles off shore and beyond.

The largest waves are expected overnight, and will range from seven to 20 feet. The best views of the waves will likely be in Ludington and Muskegon - as long as you are a safe distance from the shore.

The Old Main building at Wayne State University
Wikimedia Commons

A group of academics will visit Wayne State University this week as part of an accreditation process that happens every ten years.

The Detroit News reports that the Higher Learning Commission will be assessing the quality of education offered by the university. The organization is one of six in the U.S. that accredits colleges and universities.

Wayne State was first accredited in 1868 and has been ever since.

The Detroit Institute of Arts.
Detroit Institute of Arts

The Detroit Institute of Arts is ready to take advantage of the warm spring weather.

The museum is planning the eighth annual "Inside/Out" exhibition, which brings reproductions of famous artworks outdoors in southeast Michigan.

For this year's program, the DIA is teaming up with the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. Reproductions from both museums will be in 11 communities from April to July and in 10 other venues from August to October. Each community will have up to twelve reproductions clustered within walking or biking distance.

Lois Robins is a bit of a late-bloomer when it comes to politics.
courtesy of Lois Robins

There’s been a growing amount of political participation these past few months. Citizens are calling their representatives, dozens of protests pop up every weekend, and Congress people are facing massive crowds at town halls meetings.

But only a small number of Americans are considered politically engaged. A 2012 study by the Pew Research Center found that approximately 20% of adults had attended a political meeting and only 6% participated in an organized protest.

For many people, 2016 was the first time they actively participated in political events.

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