Jane Greenhalgh | Michigan Radio
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Jane Greenhalgh

Jane Greenhalgh is a senior producer and editor on NPR's Science Desk.

She produces the weekly Health segment on NPR's Morning Edition and writes and edits for NPR's health blog, "Shots." Greenhalgh also produces stories on science, health, and global health across NPR's many platforms.

Greenhalgh was part of the team of broadcast, digital, and multimedia journalists who produced the 2015 award-winning series "#15Girls," which examined the struggles teenage girls face throughout the developing world. Greenhalgh's story "Banished to the Shed" was one of NPR's most listened to and viewed stories of 2015.

She has twice won the National Academies of Science Communication award for her work on NPR's 2014 series "The human microbiome: guts and glory" and the 2009 series Climate Connections. She traveled extensively for this year-long, multi-platform project, examining how climate change is affecting people across the globe. From Timbuktu, where the desert nomads are giving up their way of life, to Peru, where potato farmers are moving their crops higher up the mountain, and to Bangladesh, where scientists are experimenting with drought and flood resistant rice, the stories Greenhalgh produced chronicled the impact of climate change.

Greenhalgh has traveled extensively covering health issues in developing countries, including cholera in Haiti, polio in Indonesia, tuberculosis in Kenya, AIDS in India, malaria in the Gambia, malnutrition in Bolivia, and menstrual health in Nepal.

It's been more than a year since I've seen my mother. Like many families, we live a fair distance apart and the pandemic has put a stop to our visits. I was supposed to visit last April to celebrate her 90th birthday, but instead we shared a toast over the phone and tightly crossed our fingers that by summer things would be better. They weren't.

It has become the battle cry of public health officials around the world: "Wear a mask to slow the spread." Friday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new evidence supporting this advice.

Researchers analyzed coronavirus infection rates in Kansas following a statewide mask mandate. They found that counties that chose to enforce the mandate saw their cases decrease. Counties that chose to opt out saw their cases continue to rise.

As schools across the country grapple with bringing kids back into the classroom, parents — and teachers — are worried about safety. We asked pediatricians, infectious disease specialists and education experts for help evaluating school district plans.

What we learned: There's no such thing as zero risk, but certain practices can lower the risk of an outbreak at school and keep kids, teachers and families safer.

One of the hardest things during this pandemic — for kids and adult children — has been staying away from their parents and grandparents.

People 65 years and older are at higher risk for getting a severe case of COVID-19, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And about 80% of deaths in the U.S. from COVID-19 have been in people older than 65.

A large study of the drug hydroxychloroquine has been retracted by three of its authors.

The paper, published in the journal the Lancet last month, concluded that hydroxychloroquine, taken either alone or with an antibiotic, to treat patients with COVID-19 was of no benefit and actually increased a patient's risk of dying.

President Trump is repeating his claim that the United States is doing more testing for the coronavirus than any other country.

"We have more cases because we're doing far more testing than anybody in the world," the president said in a White House briefing on Sunday.

The U.S has ramped up testing, but still lags other countries like Italy and South Korea, when it comes to testing on a per capita basis.