Lexi Krupp | Michigan Radio
WUOMFM

Lexi Krupp

Lexi Krupp holds a master’s degree in journalism from New York University and a bachelor’s degree in biology from Dartmouth College. After her career in education, she transitioned to journalism. Lexi comes from Gimlet Media where she helped the "Science Vs" podcoast team distinguish what's fact from what's not, and has written for a range of publications including Audubon and Vice.

enbridge sign in front of a gray sky
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s notice to shut down Line 5 in the Straits of Mackinac by May won’t prompt some of the changes many environmental groups hoped for.

It won’t affect how the state reviews a plan to replace the pipelines and build a tunnel beneath the lakebed, according to a ruling from Judge Dennis Mack this week.

KRIS KRÜG ON FLICKR

The plan to dig a nearly four-mile tunnel underneath the Straits of Mackinac and replace the Line 5 oil and gas pipelines continues to move forward.

Last week, Michigan’s Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy said the plan complies with environmental laws on wetland protection, cultural resources, and wastewater discharge.

But other state and federal agencies still need to weigh in on the project. And one big sticking point is climate change and whether carbon emissions from burning the oil and gas that flow through Line 5 should be a factor in deciding if the tunnel project gets greenlit.

Ryan Hagerty / U.S Fish and Wildlife Service

For decades, researchers have been trying to bring back this iconic fish to Michigan—the arctic grayling—without success. Now, more than 50 collaborators across Michigan think they’ve finally figured out what makes this fish tick. And they're hoping that means this next attempt at bringing back the arctic grayling has a shot at success. 

The Great Lakes fishery lost an estimated $50 million from the pandemic.
CREDIT T. LAWRENCE, GREAT LAKES FISHERY COMMISSION

The nationwide shutdown was especially ill-timed for fishers in the Great Lakes.

Many deal in lake whitefish, a species that dwells in cold waters. The first window to catch these fish falls after the ice melts, before the water warms up — just when the pandemic began to overwhelm the nation.