Nisa Khan | Michigan Radio
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Nisa Khan

Data Reporter

Nisa Khan joins Michigan Radio as the station’s first full-time data reporter. In that capacity, she will be reporting on data-driven news stories as well as working with other news staff to acquire and analyze data in support of their journalism.

Most recently Nisa has been working at the Detroit Free Press analyzing COVID-19 data. Additionally, she was a digital intern at Michigan Radio and worked with Michigan Radio's Peabody award winning Believed podcast team.

Nisa is a University of Michigan graduate in information science and has a master’s degree in journalism from Stanford, where she focused on data and multimedia. She was a City University of New York (CUNY) Journalism Fellow at ProPublica where she did data journalism, as well.

Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

Michigan — so far — has not seen a large spike in COVID-19 cases since the winter holidays.

 

“While I am concerned about the slight uptick in cases after the holidays, we are not seeing the surge of hospitalization that we saw in the beginning of November,” Michigan’s chief medical executive, Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, said at a press conference Jan. 13.

Kandace Day

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is now regularly releasing data about cases of an inflammatory condition that has affected some children who were, according to the state website, “infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, or had been around someone with COVID-19.”

There have been 58 confirmed cases in Michigan since April, according to a January 7 update. That is 15 more cases reported since the mid-December update. Their ages range from zero to 20.

family members inside a van decorated with eid decor
Nisa Khan for Michigan Radio

On Sunday, Muslims across the world celebrated the end of Ramadan, a month-long time of fasting, prayer, reflection, and community. 

With Governor Gretchen Whitmer's stay-at-home order in effect, Ramadan as a whole has looked a little different this year. In Dearborn, families displayed Ramadan lights as a way to brighten spirits during the coronavirus shutdown, since friends and extended family were unable to gather together to break fast during an evening meal known as the iftar. In Detroit, Mosques set up virtual connections across YouTube, Facebook, Zoom, and more to bring members together during Ramadan.

Yasmeen Fadouh, Malak Wazne, and Rima Fadlallah
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

A lot of Michiganders have hometown pride. It’s the reason you see so many locals sporting everything from bumper stickers to tattoos celebrating their home. But in some cities, hometown pride is a bit more complicated.

Cities like Dearborn, Michigan.

Dearborn native Rima Fadlallah says many people from her city see being “too Dearborn” as a negative thing. Being associated with the city's large Arab American community, she says, "in some ways is an unpopular thing to do."

Morgan McCaul
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Morgan McCaul was looking to start something.

Currently a rising junior studying at the University of Michigan, she has been in activism circles for years now. McCaul has appeared on local news, panels, and was even a speaker for this year’s Ann Arbor Women’s March, specifically in promoting awareness of sexual and domestic violence.

Vaping accesories
Cheyna Roth / Michigan Radio

 

The fruity smell associated with vape pens is a new normal in schools across Michigan, including Belding High School, east of Grand Rapids. That’s despite it being banned by its administration.

It has been five years since Flint’s water supply was switched, and the Flint water crisis began.

Since then, fifteen officials involved with the incident have been charged. The investigation has been active since 2015.

officer writing parking ticket
Daniel Hohlfeld / Adobe Stock

Tire chalking by police is now banned in Michigan, a decision the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals made Monday. A lawyer, whose client has $180 in separately issued fines, argued that this practice violates the Fourth Amendment’s protection against unreasonable searches.

First image of a black hole
Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al.

It was considered impossible. It was said to be like taking a picture of a grapefruit on the moon but with a radio telescope.

That’s how 29-year-old computer scientist Katie Bouman explained an international effort to capture an image of a black hole. She finally made history Wednesday morning after she and a team working on an Event Horizon Telescope project were able to accomplish that very goal.

beagle
Humane Society

The Michigan Humane Society is finding a loving home for a group beagles that were used as test subjects in a laboratory that involved being forced-fed fungicide.

An undercover investigation conducted by the Humane Society of the United States in mid-March revealed that beagles were injected with pesticides and subjected to numerous surgeries. The experiment with these beagles were planned for a year.

A police officer talks to a student on the scene.
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

On Saturday March 16,  at 4:35 p.m., in the middle of a vigil on the University of Michigan's Ann Arbor campus for the victims of the mass shooting in New Zealand, two police officers ran through the event, shouting for the students to move.

Martin Luther King Jr.'s Michigan connections

Jan 21, 2019
Martin Luther King Jr marching in Detroit
WALTER P. RUETHER LIBRARY / WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY

There will be lectures, marches, and celebrations across the state recognizing the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. today. The federal holiday marks King’s birthday, January 15th.

The nation celebrates it on the third Monday of January. This year, he would have been ninety years old.

Detroit street.
Pixabay

NeighborhoodScout, an online database of hyperlocal real estate information, released its annual research on the top 100 "most dangerous" cities in the United States. Bessemer, Alabama, found itself at the top of the list, with nine Michigan cities appearing throughout. 

work in progress farmers
Joey Horan / Michigan Radio

It has been a meaningful year for Michigan -- read the stories below to reflect on some of the highlights that Michigan Radio covered this year.

 

Believed

 

John Auchter / Michigan Radio
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Catch up on the most read stories about Michigan’s education system.

 

Report: State took $4.5 billion from K-12 funds to plug budget holes

 

It was supposed to be paid back. The bill included language requiring funds to be repaid to the School Aid Fund to the General Fund between fiscal years 2011/12 and 2015/16. But the legislature never paid it back.

 

A diver inspects Enbridge's Line 5 pipeline under the Straits of Mackinac for a possible dent.
Enbridge inspection video shared with the state of Michigan

From following the aftereffects of the Flint Water Crisis to the new discoveries of PFAS in the state, here is some of most important stories Michigan Radio covered on the environment.

Ripple Effects of the Flint Water Crisis

French fries
HopCat

A Michigan-based bar and restaurant chain plans to change the name of its "Crack Fries" in January to distance itself from a name associated with a drug epidemic.

A post on HopCat's website by BarFly Ventures CEO Mark Gray says the recipe and ingredients of its seasoned fries will stay the same.