Pallavi Gogoi | Michigan Radio
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Pallavi Gogoi

Women are seeing the fabric of their lives unravel during the pandemic. Nowhere is that more visible than on the job.

In September, an eye-popping 865,000 women left the U.S. workforce — four times more than men.

The coronavirus pandemic is wreaking havoc on households, and women are bearing the brunt of it. Not only have they lost the most jobs from the beginning of the pandemic, but they are exhausted from the demands of child care and housework — and many are now seeing no path ahead but to quit working.

Stay out.

It's what people are being asked to tell each other. Less than 10 days ago, London banned people who live in different households from meeting each other indoors, to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

"Nobody wants to see more restrictions, but this is deemed to be necessary in order to protect Londoners' lives," London Mayor Sadiq Khan told the London Assembly.

Lately, Zoom meetings have been hitting a nerve with CEOs.

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon says there's no vital "creative combustion" happening in virtual settings.

American Airlines CEO Doug Parker finds Zoom meetings awful.

On the face of it, $600 is a pretty unremarkable number.

The federal government has been paying this additional amount each week to every person who qualifies for unemployment benefits during the pandemic.

It was just a few months ago when things were looking up for Latinos. Wages were rising and unemployment had hit a record low.

Trish Pugh started an Ohio trucking company with her husband in 2015. Even for a small business, it's small — they had two drivers, counting her husband, until they let one go because of the coronavirus crisis.

And so her company applied for a loan under the first, $349 billion round of the Paycheck Protection Program, which the federal government had set up to rescue small businesses.

It didn't go well.

Two days after President Trump instituted a ban on travelers from Europe, our daughter Rhea was on a flight home from Madrid.

Her college study abroad program had come to an abrupt end. At the airport, she was surprised and annoyed I wouldn't give her the usual tight hug and kiss. I was awkwardly practicing social distancing with my firstborn.

And when we pulled up to our porch, my husband was waiting with a mask and gloves, hand sanitizer, and a disinfecting spray for her luggage. She started laughing incredulously: "Wait, what?"

These are prosperous times in America. The country is plump with jobs. Out of every 100 people who want to work, more than 96 of them have jobs. This is what economists consider full employment.

The economy has grown for almost 10 years, making it one of the longest economic expansions in U.S. history. And over that time, the job market has come back. It grew slowly at first, then steadily, finally reaching a point at which there are many more openings than job seekers.