Stateside Staff | Michigan Radio
WUOMFM

Stateside Staff

picture of back with tattooed flowers
Courtesy of Carrie Metz-Caporusso

There's a new generation of tattoo artists working right now that are pushing for a more inclusive approach to the industry. For a long time, much of the tattoo world was dominated by men, mostly white, who were a little rough around the edges, and focused on American traditional style tattooing. But the artists of today are changing the industry and looking at bodies and design in new ways. 

headshot of peter meijer
COURTESY OF 'WITH HONOR'

Today on Stateside, Congressman Peter Meijer, an Army veteran, reacts to news that President Joe Biden plans to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan by September 11. Meijer talks about the prospect of ending the so-called “forever war.” Also, a restaurant owner in Port Huron discusses how soaring case rates in Michigan’s Thumb region have affected his business. Plus, an Ann Arbor-based tattoo artist on making the tattoo world more inclusive.

restaurant closed sign
Kelly Sikkema / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, they’re heeeeere! Host April Baer, noted cicada enthusiast, talks with an entomologist about once-in-17 years emergence of Brood X. Plus, how the new COVID surge in Michigan is affecting businesses and Michigan’s plans to handle the crisis.

Adobe Stock

For nearly two decades, they’ve lain in wait underground. They’ve bided their time, digging through the soil beneath our feet and feeding on tree roots with their piercing, needle-like mouth parts. And now, they’re coming.

Brood X.

Courtesy of Four Way Books

Some poets construct images as immediate as a freshly snapped Polaroid. Others form lyrical landscapes like meticulously composed oil paintings. Detroit-born poet Tommye Blount’s writing lands a little like a powerful short film — its themes, characters, and worlds linger in your head long after you read it. Blount’s debut poetry collection, Fantasia for the Man in Blue, presents the head-on collisions of one queer Black American’s experiences with the mythos of white America. The collection, published by Four Way Books in March 2020, was a finalist for the National Book Award.

Today on Stateside, Michigan is hitting the pause button on the administration of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine after evidence of a serious, but incredibly rare, side effect emerged. We dive into what that means for Michiganders. Plus, a conversation with Congressman Dan Kildee about seeking treatment for PTSD symptoms he experienced following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. And a conversation with poet Tommye Blount, whose new collection grapples with the nuances of being Black and queer in Detroit. 

 

 

Governor Gretchen Whitmer and her administration are selling a message of personal responsibility to curb the spread of COVID-19. In a recent interview on CNN’s “Inside Politics,” Lt. Gov. Garlin Gilchrist said, “we can vaccinate our way out of this pandemic.” But epidemiologists and public health experts say the state will struggle to outpace COVID variants without tightening restrictions.

Coronavirus
DONFIORE / ADOBE STOCK

Today, on Stateside, revisiting our conversation with author Miles Harvey and his book “The King of Confidence.” Plus, an epidemiologist’s opinion of how the state is handling the COVID-19 surge. 

[Get Stateside on your phone: subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Google Podcasts today.]

close up of Gretchen Whitmer
Photo courtesy of www.senate.mi.gov/whitmer

Today, on Stateside, why Governor Whitmer is holding off on new restrictions, even as COVID-19 cases surge. Plus, how the Latinx community in Washtenaw County came together to make vaccines more accessible to their neighbors.

photo of the Ambassador Bridge
N Bandaru / Unsplash

The province of Ontario in Canada is now under a four-week shutdown due to the rise in COVID-19 cases. The threat to our neighbors in Windsor is due, in part, to the daily border crossing between Windsor and Detroit. 

“We have thousands of nurses and health care workers who live on the Canadian side of the border, but work largely in Detroit at the hospital networks there, the health networks. They're providing an essential service for Michiganders,” said Doug Schmidt, a reporter for the Windsor Star.

cover of the book The Elephant of Belfast
Counterpoint Press

Today, on Stateside, Windsor health officials warn essential workers crossing the border to Detroit daily to limit their time in the city during Michigan's COVID spike. Plus, writer S. Kirk Walsh talks about her debut novel The Elephant of Belfast, inspired by true events that took place during World War II.

Mercedes Mejia

Today on Stateside, COVID-19 and the threat to schools as many districts approach the remaining weeks of the school year. Then, a new PBS documentary about Ernest Hemingway highlights how summers in northern Michigan influenced his writing. And, while transcribing letters about Hemingway, students uncover the unfortunate story of Marjorie Bump.

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library

In high school English classes, students are often tasked with trudging through the classics. At West Bloomfield High School, in Jennifer Tianen’s class, they’re getting a different view of one author in the literary canon.

These students have been transcribing the letters of Marjorie Bump, a Petoskey woman who was friends with Ernest Hemingway when he lived at his boyhood summer home of Windemere. She was also a character in his Nick Adams stories, particularly The End of Something, where Hemingway’s self insert character, Adams, ends up with a broken heart.

A nurse administers a COVID-19 vaccine during a drive-thru clinic.
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, a small number of fully vaccinated people are still getting sick. That’s not necessarily cause for alarm. Plus, a conversation with poet Thomas Lynch about his new collection of poems and navigating the grief of his daughter’s death. And a citizen science project helps make data about Michigan’s lakes and aquatic wildlife more accessible.

a little girl roller skating on a road with sunlight streaming behind her
Vahe / Adobe Stock

In the introduction to his latest collection of writing, titled "Bone Rosary," poet Thomas Lynch writes:

“Never in my life did the sky seem to be falling from all four corners as it seems to now—pandemic, racial injustice, economic collapse, climate change—nor has the body politic, the culture at large, ever seemed so in cahoots as a co-morbidity.”

Clay Banks / Unsplash

Michigan’s surge of COVID-19 hospitalizations over the past couple of weeks — with some hospitals nearing bed capacity — has shocked many back to reality about where we are in the pandemic. 

“Our volumes in the emergency department are going up, and the numbers are as significant as they had been with the prior surge, although the types of complaints and patients are changing,” said Dr. Patricia Nouhan, an emergency room doctor at Ascension St. John Hospital in Detroit.

Thang Lian

April is National Poetry Month. Thang Lian is a poet and a senior at East Kentwood High School near Grand Rapids. He recently won the Alliance for Young Artists and Writers’ Gold Key Regional Award for poetry. Beyond his writing, Lian is an active member of his community in raising awareness and funds for refugees and immigrants. 

User respres / Creative Commons

Today on Stateside, a law professor discusses what can be done to remedy the burden of property tax foreclosures in Detroit. Also, a young poet shares how writing helped him understand his refugee experience. Plus, the team from Cheers! mixes up a spring cocktail to send us into Easter weekend.

voting stickers
Unsplash

Republican state lawmakers are working to push a package of 39 election-related bills through the Michigan Legislature. The bills would change state election laws in many ways, including preventing the Secretary of State’s office from mailing out absentee voter applications and requiring photo identification to vote. The bills’ authors say changes are needed in order to ensure elections are fair. But many elections experts and clerks say state elections are already fair, and the bills would make it harder for Michiganders to cast their votes.

New leadership of Bay Mills Indian Community
Bay Mills Indian Community

For the first time in the tribe’s history, the Bay Mills Indian Community will have a tribal council made up entirely of women. 

“For me, I really see that as the progress of our tribal nation moving forward in healing from prior colonization, that we have suffered from. A lot of our traditional structures that have matriarchal forms of government, matriarchal leadership, that were involved and kept a balance within our community,” said newly-elected chairwoman Whitney Gravelle

Vote Here sign
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we explore the sweeping bill package from Republican state legislators that would change election law in Michigan. Plus, we meet the new chair of the Bay Mills Indian Community. She’ll discuss the most pressing issues for her tribe, including the response to COVID-19 and the Line 5 pipelines.

Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we dive into a Republican effort to tighten up election laws in Michigan. Plus, the Michigan classrooms where teachers come, teachers go, and students miss out. And we check in with a grocer about what it’s been like for him and the store during the pandemic.

a table set up with people around it at the Ford Field vaccination site in Detroit
Vince Duffy / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, mass vaccination sites are opening in Michigan’s largest cities as the state races against another spike in COVID-19 cases. Also, we check in with two public health officials about the challenges of reaching herd immunity. Plus, the history of sea shanties sung by Black sailors on the Great Lakes.

(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

Michigan has more than its fair share of lighthouses. In fact, the Great Lakes state, with its expansive shorelines, boasts the most in the country. When you think of a lighthouse keeper, you may think of a stoic, bearded man a la The Lighthouse with Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe. While many men led this life, Michigan has a long, beautiful history of female lighthouse keepers.

University of Michigan Board of Regents

Today, on Stateside, winds change for the Michigan GOP leader who called the state’s top three elected officials witches. Plus, stories about the women who kept Michigan’s lighthouses.

[Get Stateside on your phone: subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Google Podcasts today.]

Tim Folkert / Saugatuck Center for the Arts

Today, on Stateside, we talk to an epidemiologist from the University of Michigan about what worries her about the state’s rising COVID-19 numbers. Plus, we hear from Jordan Hamilton—a Kalamazoo-based cellist—about live performance and making music during a year of pandemic.

Courtesy of Jordan Hamilton

Kalamazoo-based cellist and songwriter Jordan Hamilton had just released an award-winning album. He was planning to make music videos for his latest songs. He’d scheduled shows for the next several months, with performances booked at home in the Midwest and abroad, in Canada and France. And then the COVID-19 pandemic hit Michigan.

Public Domain

Fisheries biologist David Jude has been studying a small prey fish called the deepwater sculpin for decades. And for years, there's been one question he couldn't stop thinking about. 

“I’ve always had this passion about trying to figure out where deepwater sculpin spawn because no one has ever documented it,” Jude said. 

a person holds a vaccine vial
Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, nearly four million doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in the state of Michigan. A pharmacist discusses how pharmacies can help get vaccines into communities. Also, a look at the history of something we’re all familiar with — mask fatigue. Plus, a deep dive on an elusive Great Lakes denizen: the deepwater sculpin.

3D rendering of coronavirus
donfiore / Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, COVID-19 cases are surging again in Michigan, with more outbreaks happening at K-12 schools. A reporter talks us through the latest data. Also, how one of Detroit’s first Black educator helped desegregate Detroit schools and bring the concept of kindergarten to Michigan. Plus, the founder of Detroit Vs. Everybody discusses his latest collaboration.

Pages