Stateside Staff | Michigan Radio
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Stateside Staff

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Today on Stateside, Michigan’s Republican legislative leaders headed to the White House to talk to President Trump about his desire to reverse the will of Michigan voters. Also, the founders of Michigan’s first black-owned brewery talk about carving out their place in the craft beer scene and starting a business during a pandemic.

Jamaal Ewing and Terry Rostic
Black Calder Brewing

It’s no secret that Michigan has an incredible wealth of craft beer and breweries. But while the microbrew industry might be booming, it’s obvious that it is lacking in diversity— from brewmasters to brewery owners. While we do know some part owners and brewers who are Black, the state’s first fully-Black-owned brewery is set to release its debut beer next week.

Photo by David McClister

This has been a complicated year. It’s brought pain and grief, as well as lessons about love and hope. For musicians Michael Trotter Jr. and Tanya Blount Trotter, 2020 has been “eye-opening.” The duo, who until recently were living in Albion, now perform as The War and Treaty. 

restaurant workers
Michael Browning / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, we talk about the restaurant association’s lawsuit against the state’s orders hitting down in-person dining experiences. Also, as the CDC recommends Americans not travel for Thanksgiving, we check in on the travel industry which has been improvising day to day throughout the pandemic

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Marcela Rubio-Orozco and Andrew Epstein are married co-owners of Dolores, a restaurant and bar that served homemade Mexican food in Ypsilanti. They made the difficult decision to close the business earlier this year amid the first COVID-19 surge and the public health restrictions that accompanied it.

Courtesy of Eric Bouwens

Dr. Eric Bouwens, a physician and photographer, spent several years in Sparta, Michigan treating migrant farm workers who were harvesting in “Fruit Ridge,” an agricultural area northwest of Grand Rapids.

absentee ballot boxes in a large room
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, as COVID surges across the state, we talk to a healthcare administrator about the situation in the Upper Peninsula. Plus, a photo project focusing on the people who harvest the  the food we put on our tables. And, a look into the wild ride that was the Wayne County vote certification last night.

this is a picture of someone getting a shot
Rido / Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, we check in with the director of Michigan’s department of Health and Human Services in light of the new COVID-19 orders going into effect Wednesday. We'll also hear about how Native Americans in nineteenth century Michigan were at the forefront of the fight for equal voting rights in the state. Plus, a conversation about how to have awkward conversations surrounding your Thanksgiving plans (or lack thereof).

a pumpkin pie on a table
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Planning a Thanksgiving celebration isn’t usually a simple task—but this year, it’s bound to be particularly complicated. As COVID-19 cases continue to surge in Michigan, health officials warn that even small holiday gatherings pose risks.

It’s hard to know how to celebrate. Do you brave the cold and see family from a safe distance outdoors? Host a virtual dinner? Load up on turkey and take a long, tryptophan-induced nap? 

Restaurant workers putting up chairs.
Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, we talk about the new round of statewide restrictions Governor Whitmer announced on Sunday. We talk with the president and CEO of Trinity Health about how things look from the front lines as COVID-19 infections surge. Plus, how eateries are handling this second round of indoor dining restrictions. And a conversation with two Republicans about the future of the GOP with, or without, Trump.

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Today on Stateside, COVID-19 cases continue to rise throughout the state. We check in with an Upper Peninsula health department about the outbreak’s impact in the area. Also, U.S. Representative Rashida Tlaib (D-13th) on Election Day results and the needs of her district. Plus, new music from a Flint singer-songwriter and musician.

Rashida Tlaib with supporters
Rashida Tlaib for Congress website

Rashida Tlaib just got re-elected to her second term in Congress. She’s packed a lifetime into those two years. Part of a vibrant class of incoming freshman Democrats who helped shape politics during a critical election cycle. Now, she’s trying to meet the needs of the 13th district during a pandemic, and subsequent economic slide that erased many of the gains of the last decade.


Emergency room hospital
Pixabay

Today on Stateside, some analysis of the growing stack of lawsuits Donald Trump’s campaign has filed to overturn election results in Michigan. Also, Some of Michigan’s Republicans are less than enchanted with the prospect of what their party has become under Donald Trump.

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There are now multiple lawsuits originating from Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and his supporters attempting to stop the certification of Michigan’s election results. A flurry of filings in Michigan’s Western District federal court on November 11 were the latest. These cases are based on unsubstantiated claims of fraud or lack of transparency, says University of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos.

sign marking poll distance banning campaigning at polling places
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

The 2020 election cycle brought historic voter turnout, as well as ongoing discussions of how different racial and ethnic groups cast their ballots. Notably, preliminary exit polls show white voters favored President Trump, while Black and Latinx voters’ support contributed to Joe Biden winning the presidency. But increased turnout of Native American voters, particularly those living in swing states, may have played a key role as well.

someone writing on a ballot
Michael Dorausch / Flickr, http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, the election results are mostly settled, but that hasn’t stopped Republican leaders from following Trump’s lead with unfounded arguments about voter fraud. We talk with the executive director of Voters Not Politicians who’s been keeping tabs on the situation. Plus, we take a look at the role Native American voters played in this election. And, we discuss the future of the GOP.

The U.S. Supreme Court building
U.S. Supreme Court

Today on Stateside, we talk about what’s at stake as the U.S. Supreme Court considers a Republican challenge to the Affordable Care Act. Also, what the future of the auto industry looks like under President-elect Biden. Plus, we dig into early election results to see what we can learn about Michigan voters.

headshot of peter meijer
COURTESY OF 'WITH HONOR'

While the counts have yet to be certified, Joe Biden is the presumptive 46th president of the United States. And down the ballot, Republican Peter Meijer will be going to Congress to represent Michigan’s 3rd District.

He’s taking over the seat from Justin Amash, the first Republican to call for the impeachment of Donald Trump before changing his party affiliation to Libertarian.

Emergency room hospital
Pixabay

Today on Stateside, we talked to Congressman-elect Peter Meijer who is getting ready to succeed Justin Amash as the representative for Michigan's 3rd Congressional District. Also, we hear about how one hospital in West Michigan is grappling with a steep rise in cases there. 

Emergency room hospital
Pixabay

Today on Stateside, the Michigan Republican Party issued a number of unsubstantiated claims against election proceedings in Detroit this week. But on a county by county level, Michigan’s elections appear to have run remarkably smoothly. We check in with a county clerk about how the tabulation process went. Also, a reporter discusses an Upper Peninsula hospital’s preparations for another COVID-19 surge. 

voting booths
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, a Court of Claims judge has rejected the Trump campaign’s request to stop vote counting in Michigan. Also, we talked to election workers who were at TCF Center in Detroit on Wednesday as protesters gathered outside to demand they stop counting votes.

voting booths
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Election Day turned into days as the state’s vote counting extends into Wednesday evening. Michigan was predicted to be a focal point of this election, along with Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, and that has held true. The Associated Press has called Michigan for former Vice President Joe Biden, but there is still a U.S. Senate seat in play.

Today on Stateside, we dig in with analysis of the results we know so far—and the races still in play.

Walter P. Reuther Library: Wayne State University

It's been an historical election year shaped by an ongoing pandemic, as well as a summer surge of protests against police brutality and racial injustice. Many politicians and activists—Democrat and Republican alike—urged voters to cast their ballots with events of the past months in mind. Here's a piece of Michigan history that offers some insight on how civil rights movements can affect elections.

absentee voter envelopes and with blue and red masks on top
Tiffany Tertipes / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, it's Election Day! We spoke with the clerk of Kent County about what voting looks like in a swing district that always delivers suprises. Plus, a look back at how mass illness and social uprisings have impacted past elections.

absentee ballot and envelope
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we talk about how ready state officials and local clerks are for Election Day. Also, we'll hear about the issues shaping Latino voters’ opinions on the 2020 presidential race.

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Today on Stateside, Homeland Security officers arrested a former University of Michigan professor yesterday in Ann Arbor, on charges of bringing a minor across state lines for sex. A reporter talks us through what we know so far—and how we know it. Also, the president of the state’s largest teacher’s union on the need for masks in schools. Plus, a man whose job takes him to Michigan’s most haunted places.

Polling station sign
user jaina / Creative Commons

Today on Stateside, the role of election challengers at the polls. Also, a Mt. Pleasant photographer uses striking portraits to call attention to missing and murdered Indigenous women. And a conversation about the Arab American voting bloc in Michigan.

i voted stickers
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Four years ago, around 26% of Arab Americans in the U.S. said that they were leaning toward voting for Donald Trump for president ahead of the election. Since then, Trump has banned travel to and from numerous countries with majority Muslim populations, and the COVID-19 pandemic has brought economic and health hardships to every community—including Arab American ones. But there are still many people in these communities who prefer Trump’s conservative, social, or fiscal approaches to leadership.

"Vote here" sign
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson and Attorney General Dana Nessel have appealed a judge’s October 27 decision to block a ban on firearms at polling places this year. Benson has argued that open carry amounts to a form of voter intimidation at polling places. But some gun rights advocates disagree.

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