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Stateside Staff

picture of medical marijuana neon sign
Credit Neeta Lind / Flickr - http://j.mp/1spglc0

 


Today on Stateside, the Illitch family promised big development around Little Caesars Arena and secured $340 million in taxpayer funding for that arena. But two years later those promises haven't been kept. Plus, we hear from two women who are fighting to lower Michigan's maternal and infant mortality rates. 

a blue index card with information and photos of the wrestler Toni Rose
Courtesy of the Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, amidst a rise in hate crimes against both Jews and Muslims in the world, leaders of both faith communities in Southeast Michigan are coming together to find common ground in fighting against that hate. Plus, why the state of Michigan once had a registry of pro-wrestlers like Andre the Giant and Bruno Sammartino.  

Muslim and Jewish leaders in SE Michigan stand together to combat rise in hate

It's now commonly accepted that professional wrestling is simply entertainment. But did you know that for decades, Michigan required professional wrestlers to register with the state as athletes? And the Michigan History Center has all those registrations archived.

Joining Stateside to talk about how the state “regulated” the professional wrestling industry for decades is WCSX radio personality, and ringside manager for many independent wrestling events across Michigan, Shaffee Abraham, and state archvist at the Michigan History Center Mark Harvey.

In May 1968, Michigan Daily student photographer snapped a photo of Robert F. Kennedy shaking the hand of a young African-American girl in Detroit. Three weeks later, Kennedy was assassinated. When the photo resurfaced half a century later, it brought together the photographer and little girl in his photo together.

We talk to that photographer, Andy Sacks, and the girl in the photo, Michigan Medicine nurse Sybil Martin, about what they remember about the day, and how they reconnected more than 50 years after the photo was taken.

this is a picture of an artistic rendering of an electric vertical landing and takeoff (VTOL) taxi
Dave Brenner

 


Today on Stateside, we talk to Democratic Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin about bills she's introducing on campus sexual assault and foreign interference in U.S. elections. Plus, we'll hear about the development of flying cars and the environmental impact of a George Jetson-like commute. 

three sandhill cranes on a grassy field
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, a federal court rules that Michigan must redraw its congressional and legislative maps before the 2020 election. How does that change both parties’ political calculus? Plus, a Michigan spin on a classic cocktail to warm you up on a drizzly spring weekend.

picture of 4 photos of the Flint River and the Flint water treatment plant.
Steve Carmody

 


Today, a special edition of Stateside: Flint, Five Years Later. The Flint water crisis is seen as one of the worst public health crises in history. Life will never be the same for the 100,000 people who trusted their state and city to provide clean, safe drinking water. 

picture of robots at a robotics competition
User: Daniel Ernst / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Today on Stateside, Vice President Mike Pence comes to Detroit to whip up support for the new North American trade deal, even as automakers nervously eye President Trump's threatened tariffs. Plus, student robotics team from around the world descend on Detroit this week for the 2019 FIRST Robotics Championship.

picture of an old lead pipe.
Michigan History Center

 


On April 25th, 2014, officials switched Flint’s drinking water supply from the Detroit city system to the Flint River. Without proper corrosion control treatment, the river water corroded the city's pipes, leaching lead into the drinking water of thousands of Flint residents.

This Thursday will mark the fifth anniversary of that historic moment for Flint. 

Antonio Espree
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio


a beaded canoe that's in display in Austria
Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians

Today on Stateside, as General Motors prepares to close the company's Detroit-Hamtramck plant, how is the city of Hamtramck preparing for life after GM? Plus, a treasure trove of Anishinaabe art from Michigan is now on permanent display in Vienna, Austria.

photo of a person holding a #metoo sign
unsplash

 


Today on Stateside, Governor Whitmer reopens talks with Enbridge about a tunnel to house replacement pipelines for Line 5. But environmental groups want the current Line 5 shut down before moving forward on plans for its replacement. Plus, park officials say the thousands of shards of glass found on a beach at the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore were likely placed there intentionally. 

photo of spiral-cut ham
Brent Hofacker / Adobe Stock

Sprial cut hams with a sweet honey glaze are a staple of many Easter Sunday dining spreads. That now common method of slicing up a ham has its roots right here in Michigan. 

New York Times food correspondent Kim Severson joins Stateside to talk about tracing the origins of the spiral cut ham.

work being done during an external inspection of Line 5 in the Straits in 2016.
Enbridge

Governor Gretchen Whitmer is in talks with Enbridge about a proposed tunnel under the Straits of Mackinac for its Line 5 pipeline. That's according to the Detroit News.

cash bail
Adobe Stock

The Michigan Supreme Court has launched a pilot project to test a program called Public Safety Assessment or PSA. It's a risk assessment tool using a predictive algorithm to help judges make pretrial decisions.

The pretrial period is the time between someone being arrested and tried. At pretrial hearings, judges quickly have to decide whether a defendant should spend that time in jail or out on bail. To make that decision, they have to determine whether that person is likely to not show up to court or commit a crime.

a gargoyle on the corner of a Detroit building
Jeff Morrison

Today on Stateside, the interim president of Michigan State University has publically apologized to survivors of sexual abuse by former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar. At a Friday meeting, those survivors told the Board of Trustees that apologies aren’t enough. Plus, documenting the architectural creatures that watch over Detroit.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

Nassar survivors tell MSU trustees that apologies are not enough  

Man with beard
Courtesy Old Dog Whisker Club

 

Today on Stateside, we talk with vaccine-hesitant parents as measles cases spread. Plus, learn how your old photos can help researchers track changes to Lake Michigan's dunes.

this is a picture of someone getting a shot
Rido / Adobe Stock

 


The measles outbreak continues, and the number of cases in Michighan is climbing. There are now 41 cases confirmed to date in Oakland, Wayne, and Washtenaw Counties.

Doctors and public health officials are grappling with how to best deal with this growing public health crisis, including how they should talk to parents who refuse or delay vaccinations. 

Cary Johnson in front of fence
Courtesy of Cary Johnson

A note of warning: there is some brief graphic language in the interview. Listener discretion is advised.

  

In the past two years, the Cotton Correctional Facility in Jackson has lost four correctional officers to suicide. Earlier this month, his family and co-workers honored Michael Perdue, a long-time CO at Cotton, who died by suicide this year.

Corrections officers across the state are hoping these tragic losses will bring attention to the pressures of working in prisons.

Hash Bash
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

The 1970s were an era marked by bohemian wardrobes, protest marches, and groovy disco music. Leaning into this flair, Ann Arbor held its first annual pro-cannabis rally known as Hash Bash in 1972.

This Saturday will be the 48th anniversary of that first event. And it will be the first Hash Bash since Michigan voters legalized recreational marijuana at the polls in November. 

Unsplash

States are failing at supporting racial and socio-economic integration in charter schools, and Michigan ranks near the bottom for how it supports diversity.

That's according to a new report from the Century Foundation and its accompanying analysis of Michigan. The report looked at state laws governing charters and at enrollment data.

books and apple on a desk with abc blocks
Unsplash

 

Today on Stateside, automakers cope with the uncertainty caused by President Donald Trump's threats to close off parts of the U.S border with Mexico. Plus, remembering José Feliciano's controversial rendition of the national athem during the 1968 World Series in Detroit. 

The Quietest of Whispers, a symphony inspired by the experiences of sexual abuse survivors, will be performed at Central Michigan University this Sunday evening. Composer Evan Ware joined Stateside to discuss how the hundreds of girls and women who came forward as survivors of Larry Nassar's abuse influenced the work, and how music has been a tool for his own healing as a survivor.

President Ford reads a newspaper in the back of a car
David Hume Kennerly / Courtesy of the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum


The U.S. Treasury Department's Federal Insurance Office defines auto insurance premiums as unaffordable if they exceed two percent of an area's median household income. A study from the University of Michigan finds that, by that measure, average auto insurance rates are unaffordable in 97 percent of all Michigan zip codes. Joshua Rivera, with the University of Michigan's Poverty Solutions program, puts that number in context, and talks about why the state's auto insurance rates are among the highest in the nation. 

two cars in a rear ending accident
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 


Today on Stateside, Governor Whitmer orders an audit of the Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association after it hikes the yearly fee on auto insurance policies by 15 percent. Plus, we explore two important pieces of our state's African-American history housed at the Library of Michigan.

picture of Dudley Randall working at a Typewriter
Bentley Historical Library

 


An original copy of a manual exploring African-American life in early 20th century Michigan. Poetry from African-American literati printed on one-page broadsides by a pioneering Detroit publishing house. These are two of the treasures of Michigan’s African-American history housed at the Library of Michigan. 

Sabina “Bina” West was a country school teacher in Michigan’s Thumb before becoming a successful businesswoman and a political force. In 1892, she helped make thousands of other womens’ lives more secure by making it possible for them to buy life insurance policies without a husband or male relative.

Rachel Clark, from the Michigan History Center, talks with Stateside about the history of the Woman's Life Insurance Society, and how West built a successful business that is still running today.

The Trump Administration dropped a surprise this week: making a move to invalidate the Affordable Care Act — also known as Obamacare. The Justice Department now says the entire law should be declared unconstitutional.

Flint Democratic Congressman Dan Kildee, Chief Deputy Whip of the House Democratic Caucus, joins Stateside to react to the White House's effort to repeal the ACA, and to news that U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos plans to zero out federal funding for the Special Olympics.

picture of Sabina West
Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, Congressman Dan Kildee (D-Flint) tells us about a newly-introduced House bill that aims to improve the Affordable Care Act, even as the Trump Administration is pushing to repeal the health care law. Plus, how the adoption system is failing children with darker skin, and how to fix it. 

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