Stateside Staff | Michigan Radio
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Stateside Staff

Rashida Tlaib
Rashida Tlaib for Congress Facebook page

It was a tense and emotional visit for Democratic lawmakers at Border Patrol facilities in Texas where migrant families are being detained. 

elderly woman
Pixabay

Today on Stateside, Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib recounts the tour of migrant detention facilities in Texas. Plus, Michiganders crossing the border with Canada to buy affordable insulin.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Credit Creative Commons

 


Today on Stateside, school budgets are due today, but they'll be educated guesses until the legislature and governor pass a new budget. Plus, a London police officer has a new memoir about the 15 years he spent observing the Detroit Police Department. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.  

The stories in Lisa Lenzo’s new collection are placed primarily, although not exclusively, in Detroit. It’s a Detroit just before the recent gentrifications, and a city with vibrant friendships among neighbors, of people who take walks at night to get some air, who are cautious but unafraid. And these are often stories about caregivers, both the official ones who provide care for a living, but more often about those among us who take care of our neighbors and our families because that is what people do. That is the demand of love. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, a Republican proposal to fix Michigan’s roads is circulating in Lansing that wouldn't raise taxes. Plus a look at avian botulism, a disease that’s killing waterfowl across the Great Lakes.

Courtesy of the MI Supreme Court

 

 

Today on Stateside, how two new major US Supreme Court decisions will impact Michigan. Plus, with the anniversary of the Stonewall riots this Friday, we look at the history of the gay rights movement in Michigan.

 

The mussel uses hair-like cilia on its gills to pull water containing food particles into its shell cavity through its siphon.
NOAA

 


Today on Stateside, a public policy and economics professor at Hillsdale College weighs in on the free college tuition proposals that are bound to arise in this week's Democratic debates. Plus, some species of native freshwater mussels are under threat and we look at how their decline could change the Great Lakes.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.  

African American golfer standing on a teebox.
Courtesy of Olajuwon Ajanaku

 

This weekend is the Rocket Mortgage Classic, a PGA golf tournament taking place at the Detroit Golf Club. This will be the first time the PGA has come to Detroit, and the first time in Michigan since 2009.

 

The PGA is coordinating with several nonprofits, including The First Tee of Greater Detroit. This group works to improve access to golf among young people in lower-income communities.

 

LGBT Pride Flag
Tyrone Warner / flickr

 

In Michigan, you can be fired because you are gay. You can be denied housing in some instances. You can be denied service at a restaurant, a bar, a wedding cake baker. But that might be changing.

There's a bill in the state Legislature that would extend protections for LGBTQ folks under what's known as the Elliot Larsen Civil Rights Act.

dog inspecting old balloon laying on a beach
COURTESY OF LARA O'BRIEN

Balloons are a part of many American traditions: birthdays, graduations, retirements, weddings. It’s easy to forget these balloons once they float away, but what goes up, must come down. And pieces of balloon waste are coming down all around the Great Lakes.

Hosts Rima Fadlallah and Yasmeen Kadouh sit at microphones
David Guralnick

 

 

Today on Stateside, we talk to Democratic congresswoman Elissa Slotkin, from Michigan's 8th congressional district, about the current tensions with Iran and the debate in the Democratic party over impeachment. Plus, two young women from Dearborn talk about the inspiration for their new podcast, which highlights the stories of Arab and Muslim women in the city. 

headshot of brenda lawrence in red blazer
Office of Congresswoman Brenda L. Lawrence

 

 

Juneteenth is an annual holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States. For many years, Detroit Congressman John Conyers used the occasion to introduce a proposal for reparations for slavery. 

 

Democratic Congresswoman Brenda Lawrence, who represents Michigan's 14th congressional district, is carrying on that tradition.

State-licensed medical marijuana dispensaries have a problem: Many banks are wary to handle money involving a substance that's still illegal at the federal level. Governor Gretchen Whitmer has joined 18 other governors in calling on Congress to pass legislation federal government from punishing banks that accept money from marijuana businesses.

  • On Thursday, prosecutors dismissed felony charges against eight people on trial for actions related to the Flint water crisis. They say that they intend to reinvestigate the case. State Attorney General Dana Nessel talks about the reasoning behind the dropped charges.
  • Also, Wayne State University Professor of Law Peter Henning responds to Nessel’s comments, and explains what to expect next in the investigation into the Flint water crisis. 

Sign that says Flint vehicle city
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel comments on the recent dismissal of charges against state officials and others for actions related to the Flint water crisis. Plus, an interview with the writer of an "Afrofuturistic techno choreo-poem" set in 3071 Detroit. 

A picture from jessica Care moore's choreo-poem "Salt City.
Abby O. Photography

 

jessica Care moore is an award-winning poet and activist who grew up in Detroit. This week, she returns to her hometown to debut a unique performance combining her own history, a Detroit techno soundtrack, and dance. 

In an unexpected move, prosecutors are dismissing all charges against eight people charged in connection to the Flint water crisis, and starting over on the investigation. MLive reporter Ron Fonger joins Stateside to explain what this means for the former defendants, and whether or not more charges are likely to be filed in the near future.

With the recent 75th anniversary of D-Day, we're thinking a lot about the military heroes of World War Two. Rachel Clark of the Michigan History Center joins us to share the story of G.I. Joe, a pigeon and highly-decorated war hero who got through World War II and lived out his retirement at the Detroit Zoo.

One of the anchors used to hold Line 5 in place under the Straits of Mackinac.
Screen shot of a Ballard Marine inspection video / Enbridge Energy

 

Today on Stateside, prosecutors say they are dismissing all charges against eight people charged in connection to the Flint water crisis and starting the investigation from scratch. Plus, how autonomous "smart ships" could be part of the future of commerce and research on the Great Lakes. 

 

soldier holding GI Joe the pigeon
Courtesy of the Michigan History Center

 

Today on Stateside, we talk about rethinking how we measure whether a school is succeeding or failing. Plus, a conversation with Michigan Supreme Court Justice Richard Bernstein about how people with disabilities bring unique, important perspectives to the workplace.

Stephanie Zarb in the interior of a plane
Courtesy of Stephanie Zarb

 


 

David Hornibrook grew up in the suburbs of Detroit where he worked for many years as a caregiver and nonprofit administrator. Now, he's added "published poet" to his resume with the recent release of his debut poetry collection, Night ManualStateside's book reviewer John Freeman tells us how Hornibrook brings empathy and imagination into his writing in this debut collection.

Looking down on a hand holding an open bottle of prescription drugs.
Sharyn Morrow / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

 

Today on Stateside, a look at how the no-fault auto insurance changes could affect health care. Plus, out-of-pocket drug costs are still rising, and it’s not clear where a solution could come from.

 

Long-term care provider: No-fault changes would ensure your car’s repaired but not necessarily your body

 

 

The clock is ticking for Benton Harbor High School. The state says the district is $18.4 million in debt and could run out of money by next spring.

On Wednesday night, Governor Gretchen Whitmer told local leaders in the Southwest Michigan city that they have until June 14 to submit a plan to keep their high school open.  If Benton Harbor Area Schools can’t reach an agreement with the state, the entire district could be dissolved.

Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan bean farmers send a lot of exports to Mexico. So, what happens to those farmers if President Trump follows through on his threats to add tariffs to Mexican goods? Plus, we hear about a tricked out bicycle with accordion and percussion instruments that blends classical music and public art. 

Ludmilla Joaquina Valentina Buyo / Public Domain

One of the perks of living on the east side of Michigan is that you can occasionally tune into radio stations across the border in Windsor. A recent piece from the CBC tells the story of how Elton John’s hit song “Bennie and the Jets” may owe part of its popularity to one of those stations and its Detroit audience. 

Blue Bird Inn sign and building
Nephilim Art Studios / Courtesy of Detroit Sound Conservancy

Some of jazz's most iconic musicians have graced the stage at the Blue Bird Inn on Detroit’s West Side. But the once popular bar at 5021 Tireman has stood empty for more than a decade. Now, there’s an effort to restore the historic venue for a new era.

cbd oil
Tinnakorn / Adobe Stock

 

The Food and Drug Adminstration wants to collect more information about CBD, a non-toxicating extract of the cannabis plant. This comes as CBD-infused products such as candy, oils, drinks, and even dog food are already flooding the market. 

CBD is becoming popular for treating things such as chronic pain and other ailments -- despite confusion around its legal status.

cannabis leaves and three CBD oil
yavdat / Adobe Stock

 

Today on Stateside, the potential of the cannabis compound CBD as a treatment for people with chronic pain. Plus, a new study says the tax incentives states use to lure businesses might not be paying off. 

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