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Stateside Staff

Students sitting at desks in a classroom with a teacher at the front of the room
NeONBRAND / Pixabay

Today on Stateside, Gretchen Whitmer will deliver the Democratic response to President Trump’s State of the Union speech Tuesday. We talk to two communications experts about what notes Whitmer needs to hit while she's in the national spotlight. Plus, a Detroit-born art curator talks about how contemporary work by African Americans confronts society's indifference to black people's experiences.

Kelli Morgan stands in front of a painting
April Baer / Michigan Radio

The Flint Institute of Art's exhibit Community draws attention to black spaces and black lives, in both quiet and dramatic ways. The pieces in the exhibition vary in medium and message, but the story they tell broadens our understanding of black history.

Gretchen whitmer at a microphone
Jake Neher / WDET

Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer is set to deliver the Democratic rebuttal to President Trump’s State of the Union next week. Why was she chosen and what can we expect to hear? Plus, the head of a Dearborn seminary talks about educating the next generation of Muslim faith leaders.

As Senate impeachment proceedings wind down, focus turns to President Trump's State of the State speech next week. Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer will deliver the Democratic rebuttal. We talk to our Friday political commentators about how she might position Michigan as a key player in a contentious election year. John Sellek is the CEO of Harbor Strategic Public Relations. Matt Friedman is co-founder of the Tanner Friedman public relations firm.

Cracked and broken roads
nirbhao / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Today on Stateside, Gretchen Whitmer laid out her 2020 agenda at Wednesday's State of the State address. We'll talk to the governor, and lawmakers from both parties, about what comes next. Plus, an investigative report into how law enforcement and a religious group let a suspected child predator go.

Gretchen Whitmer
Michigan.gov

Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer will lay out her agenda for the year ahead at Wednesday night’s State of the State address. What can we expect to hear? Plus, a former U.S. Attorney for Michigan says there's an important struggle going on over the limits of executive power in the impeachment trial.

absentee ballot
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, local and county clerks are raising concerns about their ability to deal with an influx of absentee ballots in November’s presidential election. Plus, the woman who turned the University of Michigan into a softball powerhouse talks about the yawning gender equity gap in college sports coaching. 

Carol Hutchins talks to a player
User MGoBlog / Flickr / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The federal civil rights legislation known as Title IX was instrumental in creating opportunities for women athletes in high school and college sports. Previously, varsity sports were mostly reserved for men while women played club sports on teams with shoestring budgets. As Title IX opened doors for female athletes, though, coaching opportunities for women gradually dwindled after its passage.

Boy in classroom with his hand raised
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, a new report calls on Michigan lawmakers to deal with the funding disparities between the state's poorest and wealthiest school districts. Plus, a staged reading of an FBI interrogation takes us inside one intelligence contractor's choice.

A photo of a group of people marching and protesting
Unsplash

The stories of great activists are recorded in history books. Their words are quoted by politicians long after their movements have instigated large scale change. For the most part, history focuses on what activists accomplished. That can obscure the personal trials and tribulations of activists who organize and strengthen movements. We spoke to two activists, on opposite sides of the political spectrum, about the personal costs of a life of activism.

I Prevail

This weekend will be a monumental moment for the Michigan-based band, I Prevail. When their album, "Trauma," came out last year, it became an instant chart-topper. Their single, "Bow Down" hit Billboard's Rock Top 10. Their band has been nominated for Best Metal Performance and Best Rock Album at this year's Grammy Awards ceremony. 

Work continues this week on the Enbridge tunnel planned beneath the Straits of Mackinac. The tunnel would house replacements for the twin pipelines known as Line 5. Michigan leaders are still locked in legal action with the company over the project. Last week, a panel of the Michigan Court of Appeals rejected a state request to halt construction.

work being done under Mackinac bridge
Enbridge

Today on Stateside, we talk to the head of Enbridge's tunnel project about what's happening with Line 5. Plus, a conversation with the Detroit-based metal band I Prevail, which is nominated for two Grammy Awards this year.

money beside art equipment
Victoria М / Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, we look at the dispute over Michigan's ban on public funding for private education. The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing arguments today in a case that could affect how the Michigan Supreme Court rules later this year. Plus, Tesla is coming to Michigan and we hear from a reporter about how the move could alter the auto industry's traditional power base.

photo of cannabis in a jar
Unsplash

Sales of recreational marijuana in Michigan have been booming. In the first six weeks after licensed dispensaries began selling the product in December, sales topped $10 million, generating around $1.7 million in tax revenue. But none of that money can legally be deposited in a bank. 

A picture of the night sky with trees on the horizon in Dr. T.K. Lawless Park
International Dark Sky Association

When you look up at the night sky what do you see? For many of us, light pollution limits the view. But a new dark sky park in Cass County, Michigan will provide a place to see the night sky in its full glory.

Marijuana plant
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Today on Stateside, a lack of legal banking options in the marijuana industry means that many businesses are operating solely in cash—creating significant safety risks and limiting the industry's growth. Plus, a Michigan Supreme Court case is testing how much money the government can collect from tax-delinquent homeowners. 

Today on Stateside, we step back in time to the summer of 1963, to hear how Martin Luther King Junior set the stage in Detroit for the March on Washington later that year. Plus, we go over this year's list of Michigan Notable Books, which includes everything from new fiction to gripping history.

Martin Luther King Jr marching in Detroit
WALTER P. RUETHER LIBRARY / WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY

On June 23, 1963 Martin Luther King Jr. stood in Detroit and spoke about a dream. It was a fraught moment in the history of the American civil rights movement. Noted civil rights activist Medger Evers had been murdered by a white supremacist just days earlier.

We talked to Detroit historian Ken Coleman, author of On This Day: African-American Life in Detroit and writer for Michigan Advance, about MLK Jr.’s visit to the city. 

Now that winter is feeling a little more, well, wintry, it’s a good time to hunker down inside with a book. If you’re looking for something new to read, the Library of Michigan has a few suggestions. Its 2020 Michigan Notable Books list was announced on Sunday. 

blue recycling bin on sidewalk
Anna Schlutt / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, what the story about a state senator's alleged sexual harassment of a female journalist says about Capitol culture. Plus, a look at where Michigan's recyclables are going, two years after China stopped accepting U.S. waste.

Michigan State Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Michigan State Senator Peter Lucido (R-Shelby Township) has received national attention for an off-the-cuff comment he made to a female journalist from the Michigan Advance outside the Senate chamber on Tuesday.

U.S. EPA

Thirty years before toxic green ooze spilled onto a Madison Heights road, the state's Pollution Emergency Alerting System hotline received a complaint about chemical storage pits dug into the basement of Electro-Plating Services (EPS).

For three years, it appears the state took no action. Then, in 1993, another complaint was made to the hotline. This time, the state investigated.

a man stands in front of a classroom at a white board
Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, a Democratic congressman is proposing new regulations for safe disposal of PFAS. Plus, schools around the state are increasingly relying on long-term substitute teachers. We talk about what this means for students, and strategies for getting more certified teachers into classrooms.

Michigan flag.
Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

If you live in Michigan, you’ve probably heard the debate over what we should call people who live here. For the most part, it’s a battle between Michiganian and Michigander, although there are few other odd-ball choices thrown in there, too. (See the suggestions of Stateside producer, Mike Blank.) 

Our new Stateside host April Baer mentioned on Twitter that she thought Michigander was a strange way to refer to people from the Great Lakes State. So, we decided to throw the question to the Twitter-verse. Our not-so-scientific poll showed an overwhelming preference for Michigander—with 92% of the votes.

a sign that says Flint River along the actual flint river
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, it’s been four years since the state announced a criminal investigation into the Flint water crisis. We talked to two journalists who covered the crisis about lessons learned on government accountability and public health. Plus, the state of Michigan files suit against some of the biggest names in corporate America over PFAS contamination. We'll hear about how a similar case played out in Minnesota. 

Jeff Daniels sits in the Stateside studio with April Baer
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Jeff Daniels’ new play Roadsigns follows a young poet on a journey to find himself and his encounters with society's outcasts. The main character is based on Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, and Daniels' longtime friend, the late Lanford Wilson.

Logo of a GOP elephant and Democratic donkey
User: DonkeyHotey / Flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, we take a deeper look at how property tax foreclosures in Detroit created a pileup of city-owned properties, and left residents to care for the most desolate blocks. Plus, a Michigan photographer captures a whole year of sunrises in the Upper Peninsula. 

a sunrise looking out over lake superior framed by trees
Bugsy Sailor

For many of us, it is more pleasurable to look at pictures of beautiful sunrises than to get up and actually see beautiful sunrises.

a house with a foreclosure sign in front of it
BasicGov / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

An investigation by Reveal, the Detroit News, and PRX discovered the city of Detroit collected $600 million more than it should have in taxes because of over-assessed property values. Detroit News reporter Christine MacDonald and freelance journalist Mark Betancourt co-reported the story. They joined us to talk about how those overvalued properties contributed to the high number of foreclosures on Detroit homeowners.

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