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Steve Carmody

Mid-Michigan Reporter / Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005.

Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting.

During his three-plus decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

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Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

This is a developing story. It will be updated with new information as we receive it. Please check back.

Update: Wednesday, May 20, 12:48 a.m.

The city of Midland is bracing for the worst.

A pair of dam failures, fueled by up to eight inches of rain this week, have swelled the Tittabawassee River. The river flows through the city’s center.

Midland City Manager Brad Kaye says the flood could leave part of the city under nine feet of water.

“The 1986 flood that most people remember, that were here at least, or if you weren’t here, you certainly heard about it, was a 100-year flood. What we’re looking at is an event that is the equivalent of a 500-year flood,” says Kaye.

Multi-colored books.
Kimberly Farmer / Unsplash

A federal appeals court has thrown out a groundbreaking decision that said Detroit students had a constitutional right to education and literacy. The move comes just days after Michigan's governor settled the case by agreeing to seek millions from the Legislature to improve education programs.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A northern Michigan county is asking Governor Gretchen Whitmer to declare a state of emergency in the wake of heavy rain and flooding this week.

Parts of Arenac County were inundated with more than eight inches of rain Sunday through Monday.

Ed Rohn is the Arenac & Iosco County Emergency Management Director. He says the result of the heavy rains of the past few days is millions of dollars in damage, beyond what the county saw in 2017.

City of Detroit

Starting Wednesday, any Detroit resident will be able to make an appointment to get tested for COVID-19.

Previously, free testing in Detroit was restricted to people with a doctor’s note, symptoms, essential workers and people over the age of 60.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint is seeing a statistically significant drop in most crimes, city officials say.

To date, criminal sexual conduct, burglary and theft are down significantly in 2020.  Murder is up slightly in the Vehicle City. The drop coincides with an effort to work with the Michigan State Police and other local law enforcement.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The legal battle by a Michigan barber against Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s COVID-19 orders escalated Wednesday.

State regulators suspended Karl Manke’s professional license and pulled his barbershop license on Wednesday. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Updated May 13, 2020 at 2:45 p.m.:

The Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs has suspended the license of barber Karl Manke, according to the Lansing State Journal

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Revenues are down sharply at Detroit’s casinos, due largely to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Detroit’s three casinos shut their doors March 16th as part of the state's efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.

Businesses in Hamtramck, Michigan
Ian Freimuth / creative commons

A longtime leader in Michigan’s business community is predicting it'll take a while for Michigan’s economy to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Doug Rothwell is the president of Business Leaders for Michigan and a former head of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. 

On a webinar produced by the Detroit Regional Chamber, Rothwell predicted Michigan’s economy will not have a quick 'V-shaped’ recovery.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s recreational marijuana industry has seen sales soar in recent weeks.

Last week (5/4-5/10), Michiganders shelled out $7,913,328 on recreational cannabis products.  That’s the biggest sales week in the adult use industry’s brief history in the state.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Some Democratic state lawmakers and activists say now is the time to permanently extend and expand unemployment benefits in Michigan.

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, more than a million Michiganders have applied for unemployment benefits. The state is expanding jobless benefits during the pandemic.

But State Representative Terry Sabo (D-Muskegon) says the COVID-19 crisis revealed problems with the current system.

“It just really puts the microscope on how our unemployment insurance agency is now structured,” says Sabo.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

On Tuesday, a federal appeals court ruled a lower court erred when it told the state of Michigan exactly how to accommodate candidates trying to get on the August primary ballot.

Some state and federal candidates claimed Michigan’s stay home order prevented them from collecting enough signatures to qualify for the August ballot. 

FEDOROVACZ / ADOBE STOCK

A new University of Michigan study finds teens are drawn to vaping products even though they're aware of the health risks. Teens expressed a ‘desire to fit in,' 'getting a buzz,’ and ‘experimentation' as reasons for vaping.

Researchers asked more than a thousand teenagers about using vaping products, particularly Juul products which are the most popular on the market.

Gretchen Whitmer at a podium
michigan.gov

After easing restrictions for industries like landscaping and construction over the past two weeks, Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced today in a press briefing that the state will need to have a waiting period before making decisions about other industries going back to work.

Governor Whitmer announced last week construction could begin again on May 7. She says now the state will study if cases of COVID-19 begin to increase again when some sectors of the economy return to work.

The state of Michigan is modifying rules for how hospitals and funeral homes handle human remains in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In the past, the state just required hospitals and funeral homes make a “reasonable effort” to contact family members before turning to the local medical examiner to decide what to do with the remains.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Tuesday’s election is going to be unique in Michigan history.

As part of the effort to reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus, there will be no polling locations open for in-person voting on Election Day.

Instead, the May 5 election will be mainly handled with “mail-in” voting.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan school districts will soon be allowed to apply for millions of dollars of federal aid tied to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The $13.2 billion Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) fund is meant to address the impact the COVID-19 public health crisis has had, and continues to have, on elementary and secondary schools across the United States. ESSER funding was included as part of the $2 trillion federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. 

Wayne County Executive Warren Evans is optimistic about the county’s fight with COVID-19.

Wayne County is the hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic in Michigan. The city of Detroit and Wayne County have a combined 16,970 positive coronavirus cases and 1,802 deaths linked to the disease.

But Evans says the county is making progress.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A recent battle between Michigan’s Democratic governor and Republican legislative leaders over who has the authority to guide the state’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak is likely at a point of no return. 

This week, Republican lawmakers refused to agree to the governor’s call to extend the state of emergency. Legislative leaders say they plan on taking the governor to court over her authority to issue new executive orders to combat COVID-19.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

On Wednesday, a judge denied a legal challenge to Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s stay home order.

Whitmer issued the initial stay home order in March with the intent to slow the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19.

Congressman Justin Amash
Facebook

Michigan Congressman Justin Amash has decided to explore a run for a higher office: President of the United States.

On Twitter Tuesday night, Amash announced he’s formed an exploratory committee to run for the Libertarian Party’s presidential nomination.

The COVID-19 pandemic has slammed Ford Motor Company’s bottom line.

Company officials announced on Tuesday Ford lost $2 billion in the first quarter of the year. Ford blamed the loss largely on the impact of the coronavirus outbreak.

The automaker said Tuesday that its revenue from January through March fell nearly 15% to $34.3 billion as most of its factories were shut down for the final week of the quarter.

Ford’s Chief Financial Officer Tim Stone expects the automaker will take an even bigger hit in the second quarter of 2020.

U.S. Department of Justice

One of Michigan’s U.S. Attorneys has been chosen to oversee federal investigations into state and local anti-COVID-19 measures to determine if they cross the constitutional line.

Attorney General William Barr issued a two-page memo on Monday to U.S. attorneys, saying the department would pursue action in court, if necessary.

Many states have issued orders compelling residents to stay home, with limited exceptions like essential trips for food and other supplies to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. 

Matthew Schneider is the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan. 

U.S. Attorney General William Barr picked Schneider  to coordinate with Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights Eric Dreiband to coordinate Justice Department investigations into possible “infringement of constitutional and statutory protections” by state and local governments.   

Gretchen Whitmer at a podium
michigan.gov

Governor Gretchen Whitmer says it’s time to start re-engaging Michigan’s economy as the COVID-19 outbreak is plateauing in the state.

Following her decision to allow landscapers to get back to work last week, the governor says construction and outdoor businesses will likely be next. The governor says she’s loosening restrictions on commercial and residential construction.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal class action lawsuit aimed at winning the release of immigrants housed at the Calhoun County jail.

The ACLU estimates there are approximately 130 immigrants being held at the jail for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.  According to the ACLU, it’s the largest number of ICE detainees at a facility in Michigan.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Monday, the city of Detroit will issue a public health order mandating grocery store workers be tested for coronavirus by May 11.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report suggests restarting Michigan’s economy will face a serious roadblock – a lack of child care.

The National Association for the Education of Young Children estimates that 41% of Michigan’s licensed child care slots will be lost as many providers don’t have the money or staff to reopen.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Monday, the Flint city council may reconsider a contract to build a back-up drinking water source.

Saturday was the 6th anniversary of the Flint Water Crisis. On April 25th, 2014, Flint’s drinking water source was switched as part of an effort to save money. But improperly treated water from the Flint River damaged city pipes and released lead into Flint’s tap water.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The number of Michiganders who have officially “recovered” from COVID-19 has more than doubled in the past week

State health official released data Saturday showing the number of recovered cases has risen to 8,342.  The state listed 3,237 “recovered” cases last Saturday and 433 two weeks ago.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A federal judge has denied a request by the state of Michigan to stay a ruling reducing the number of signatures needed to get on the August primary ballot.

Candidates unable to collect signatures because of the governor’s Stay Home order sued and won more time for collect fewer signatures to qualify for the ballot.    The deadline had been this past Tuesday, April 21st.

But the Michigan Attorney General’s office asked the judge to reconsider the ruling, since the Republican congressional candidate who brought the lawsuit had actually met the filing deadline.

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