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Politics & Government

Bipartisan law aims to protect Michiganders from warrantless federal searches

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Pawe? Czerwi?ski
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The Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution reads, “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

Yet, in January, Congress and the President extended warrantless surveillance of phone calls, emails, personal Facebook pages and messages, permitting the National Security Agency (NSA) to spy on U.S. citizens for six more years.

Several states have introduced bills banning cooperation with the NSA in its warrantless searches. Few have actually passed. But a bill in Michigan did pass. Representative Martin Howrylak’s (R-Troy) proposal goes into effect on June 17th.

Rep. Howrylak joined Stateside to discuss his motivation for drafting the bill, and the ideological differences between Michigan lawmakers and federal lawmakers on this issue.

Listen above.

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