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Politics & Government

Don't redraw those electoral maps just yet, says U.S. Supreme Court

Michigan congressional map
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The Supreme Court is putting on hold court orders in Michigan and Ohio to redraw electoral maps that federal judges found were too partisan.

The high court action comes Friday as it is weighing cases from Maryland and North Carolina that raise similar issues and could affect redistricting everywhere.

The order from the justices does not telegraph the outcome of the redistricting cases that are expected to be decided by the end of June. It more likely reflects that whatever the court decides probably will affect rulings that struck down legislative and congressional districts in Michigan and congressional districts in Ohio.

Ohio lawmakers faced a June 14 deadline to draw new congressional districts, or have the courts do it for them. The deadline in Michigan was Aug. 1.

Both political parties in Michigan have responded to the action:

“The people of Michigan have already spoken, and they want fair elections and their voices heard—not after the next election, not down the road—now," said Michigan Democratic Party Chair Lavora Barnes. "We are more than disappointed with the Supreme Court’s decision, but we will not allow Republican gerrymandering or efforts to silence our citizens at the ballot box stand in the way of Democrats connecting with every Michigan voter.”

“The Michigan redistricting lawsuit is simply a desperate attempt by partisan Democrats to redraw our state’s legislative lines two years early," said Michigan Republican Party Chairman Laura Cox. "Their political games would disenfranchise Michigan voters and force early elections. I applaud the United State Supreme Court’s decision to issue a stay in the case. This will allow our legislature to continue focusing on getting things done for the people of Michigan, instead of unnecessary partisan battles over political maps.” 

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