Besides COVID-19, Slotkin says domestic terror and environmental health pose threats | Michigan Radio
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Besides COVID-19, Slotkin says domestic terror and environmental health pose threats

Feb 10, 2021

Democratic Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin said in a speech Wednesday evening that some of the biggest threats facing her Michigan constituents are domestic terrorism, environmental health, and the pandemic.

Slotkin said toxic political division in the U.S. fans the flames of violence and extremism – like the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on January 6. In her second State of the District address, presented virtually, Slotkin urged people to find political common ground with their neighbors.

"We must address our internal division, or violence and extremism will only worsen,” Slotkin said. “But to rebuild, to restore and to return to a place of trust and understanding, we cannot keep treating those who disagree with us as the enemy."

Slotkin said domestic terrorism is a greater threat today then terrorism threats from overseas. She was re-elected to represent Michigan’s 8th district in 2020 and was recently named chair of a House subcommittee on Intelligence and Counterterrorism.

“I plan to address these threats directly through legislation that ensures to protect civil liberties and privacy while punishing those who will incite or use violence to further their political goals,” Slotkin said.

Coronavirus vaccine supplies are still limited, but people want to know how and when they can hope to get an appointment to be vaccinated.

Slotkin said it’s the number one question she’s getting from constituents.

“I’m on Zoom calls and telephone calls constantly about this issue with the state and federal government and all I can say is that supply is steadily increasing, and it should start to become easier to get an appointment over the next few weeks,” she said.

Slotkin said the federal government needs to pass more stimulus to help people through the coronavirus pandemic. She also said the health of the environment should be treated like a national security issue. She said she plans to use her position on the House Armed Services committee to “keep the pressure” on the Pentagon to clean up PFAS contamination at former Michigan military sites.