Stateside: A decade of UAW corruption; preventing domestic violence; building a journalism career | Michigan Radio
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Stateside: A decade of UAW corruption; preventing domestic violence; building a journalism career

Dec 19, 2019

Today on Stateside, bribes, kickbacks, lavish spending of union dues and federal bailout money. We hear about the recent Detroit News investigation that revealed years of corruption orchestrated by Fiat Chrysler and UAW leaders. Plus, a domestic abuse survivor who became an activist focused on preventing relationship violence among young people.  

Listen to the full show above or find individual interviews below.

Howes: Corruption among UAW, FCA leaders traced back to 2009 auto bailout

  • The federal corruption probe into the United Auto Workers union continues, and the headlines keep coming. There have been FBI raids, indictments, and convictions. Top leaders have resigned, including former president Gary Jones, over evidence of bribes, kickbacks, and misuse of union money. A recent Detroit News investigation details how greed fueled a decade of corruption orchestrated by leaders at Fiat-Chrysler and union leaders. We talk to Daniel Howes, one of the report's co-authors, about the details of how the corruption started and why it continued for so many years.

How Nicole Beverly went from living in fear to fighting back for victims of domestic violence

  • In June 2017, Nicole Beverly came onto Stateside to share her story of the years of abuse she suffered at the hands of her ex-husband Kevin Beverly. While he was in prison, two inmates came forward to say that Kevin had told them he had plans to kill Nicole and her children when he left prison. Nicole alleges that her ex-husband made four attempts to hire others to kill her and her sons. Kevin Beverly was later convicted of crimes that could keep him in prison until at least 2030. We checked back in with Nicole about what life is like for her and her sons now, and how she is using her story to advocate for violence prevention among young people.

Dinner Party Convo: How two women built careers as prominent metro Detroit journalists 

  • It’s Cynthia Canty’s final week on Stateside before she retires after a 40-year-long career in radio and television. Before that happens, she lined up some conversations with the people she would invite to her “dream dinner party.” Two of those guests are well-known by newspaper readers and TV viewers in Southeast Michigan. They also happen to be Cynthia's dear friends.
  • Rochelle Riley was a long-time Detroit Free Press columnist and author of the book The Burden: African Americans and the Enduring Impact of Slavery. She is now the city of Detroit's Director of Arts and Culture. Mara MacDonald is a lead reporter on WDIV-Local 4, the NBC affiliate in Detroit. They talked to Cynthia about their paths into journalism, and what’s unique about reporting on Michigan issues.

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