Stateside: Unintended effects of no-fault changes; worker shortage in Traverse City; Faygo cocktails | Michigan Radio
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Stateside: Unintended effects of no-fault changes; worker shortage in Traverse City; Faygo cocktails

Jun 7, 2019

 

 

Today on Stateside, a look at how the no-fault auto insurance changes could affect health care. Plus, out-of-pocket drug costs are still rising, and it’s not clear where a solution could come from.

 

Long-term care provider: No-fault changes would ensure your car’s repaired but not necessarily your body

 

 

  • The changes to Michigan’s no-fault auto insurance are law now. But because it was rushed through the Legislature, the policy could have unintended consequences on different aspects of Michigan insurance, including the kind of care people receive for long-term injuries following auto accidents.

 

  • Phil Weaver is the President and CEO of Hope Network, a non-profit organization that provides specialty health services to people in many different situations, including car crash victims. He talks about how the new policy could keep Michigan drivers from getting adequate long-term care.

 

As tourist season kicks off, resorts and businesses struggle to find enough workers to keep up

 

 

 

  • For Michigan, tourism is big business, and the state relies heavily on seasonal migrant workers. This summer, there’s a shortage of labor. Trevor Tkach is the CEO of Traverse City Tourism. Matthew Bryant is the new general manager of the Grand Traverse Resort and Spa. They relate the reasons for this shortage and what it could lead to in the long run, including reduced business hours and fewer new facilities.

 

Study shows medication prices vary wildly between patients  —  and prescribers can’t know what you’ll pay

 

 

 

  • Drug prices have risen substantially in recent years. Brian Callaghan, Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Michigan, led a new study that reveals how much out-of-pocket costs have increased for patients with certain neurological disorders in the past 12 years. He talks about the details of the study, why we’re paying more, and what we can do about it.

 

 

Enbridge files legal action as proposed tunnel for Line 5 comes under fire

 

 

  • Since Governor Gretchen Whitmer has been in office, she’s been negotiating with the Canadian pipeline company Enbridge about whether the company can build a tunnel to house Line 5, which transports oil and natural gas liquids  under the Straits of Mackinac. On Thursday, Enbridge walked away from negotiations, promising to take the State of Michigan to court over the issue.

 

  • Beth LeBlanc from The Detroit News is covering the story, and she joins Stateside to discuss what could result from a court case and what Whitmer and Enbridge hope for in the long run.

 

Roundup: Should legislators consider selling public assets in lieu of raising taxes?

 

 

 

  • Governor Whitmer’s plan to raise gas taxes in order to fix roads hasn’t been well received by the state Legislature or the public. Republicans have offered an alternative: to sell some state property, like rest stops and small airports, in order to pay for road repairs. 

 

  • Vicki Barnett is a former mayor of Farmington Hills and a former Democratic state legislator. John Sellek is the CEO of the Lansing public relations firm Harbor Strategic. They join Stateside to discuss whether this idea would be a feasible alternative to Whitmer’s plan.

 

Cheers! Using Faygo in a couple of drinks for summer

 

 

  • Stateside host Lester Graham and Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings take a listener request and make two Faygo-based cocktails perfect to beat the summer heat.

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