Stateside: Why RBG’s death matters to MI; schools reopen up North; sexual abuse bills in Legislature | Michigan Radio
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Stateside: Why RBG’s death matters to MI; schools reopen up North; sexual abuse bills in Legislature

Sep 21, 2020

Today on Stateside, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death last week sent shockwaves throughout the nation, both emotionally and politically. We talk to one of her former clerks about Ginsburg's legacy and what the future makeup of the Supreme Court means for Michigan. Plus, a former Michigan football player talks about the abuse scandal surrounding former sports doctor Robert Anderson, and the breadth of access our state institutions provide to abusers.

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Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

The judicial legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and what the future of the Supreme Court means for Michigan

  • Richard Primus is a law professor at the University of Michigan, and was once a clerk for the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Friday. 

Traverse City schools head back to in-person learning after three weeks online

  • Max Johnston is a reporter with Interlochen Public Radio

First weeks of in-person school in Escanaba bring excitement, new challenges for teachers and students

  • Gina Pepin is a reading specialist in Escanaba and was the 2018-2019 Michigan Region 1 Teacher of the Year.

Former UM football player talks about coming to terms with being abused  

  • Jon Vaughn is a former University of Michigan football player and a former NFL player, who has accused Dr. Robert Anderson of sexually abusing him while he was an athlete at UM. 
  • Ryan Berman is a Republican state lawmaker representing Commerce Township. 
  • Stateside reached out to the University of Michigan for comment on the bills in the state Legislature and comments from Jon Vaughn. A UM spokesperson sent us this statement: 

"The university is engaging in mediation with a number of attorneys representing former Anderson patients. The university is eager to engage with the former patients and their attorneys regarding the best approach to resolving these claims. We want to bring closure for those who have so bravely come forward to share their experiences and want to develop a fair resolution process that does not require drawn-out litigation. Regarding the legislative proposal, the university will carefully review the proposal, but there is little more we can say at this time while the independent investigation by the WilmerHale law firm remains active."