Morning Edition | Michigan Radio
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Morning Edition

Weekday mornings from 5:00 - 9:00 a.m.

Weekday mornings on Michigan Radio, Doug Tribou hosts NPR's Morning Edition, the most listened-to news radio program in the country. The show brings listeners up-to-the-minute news, analysis, commentary, interviews, and coverage of the arts and sports. Morning Edition on Michigan Radio features work by our team of reporters, Doug's in-depth interviews, and observations from our sports commentator John U. Bacon. You'll also hear special features, including It's Just PoliticsStoryCorps, and Mornings in Michigan

Courtesty of the Michigan Department of Health and Humans Services

As the new coronavirus spreads around the world -- and right here in Michigan --  an official with the World Health Organization delivered some advice yesterday, saying, "We have a simple message for all countries: test, test, test. Test every suspected case."

Commerica Park
MJCdetroit/Wikimedia Commons

The domino effect of the novel coronavirus has been on full display in the world of sports in past couple of days. After an NBA player tested positive for COVID-19, the league suspended its season. Since then, the NCAA has called off its men's and women's basketball tournaments. The NHL suspended its season. And Major League Baseball canceled the rest of spring training and has delayed Opening Day by at least two weeks.

Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with Jon Morosi about the ripple effects. Morosi covers baseball for MLB Network and Fox Sports. He also reports for the NHL Network and is a native Michigander.

Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders speaking into separate microphones
Gage Skidmore / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

Michigan is a large, diverse state, and presidential candidates have been courting minority voters here in the days leading up to Tuesday’s primaries.

For a closer look at the influence of minority populations in this election cycle, Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with Michigan State University political science professor Nazita Lajevardi.

GOP elephant, Dem donkey
Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

Political parties usually love to get voters to switch to their side, but sometimes they’d just as soon have them stay put.

Primaries can be a time of political tricks by party loyalists who switch their stripes for a day in order to influence the other party's results.

ballot
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Michiganders will head to the polls on March 10. Predictably the presidential primaries are getting all kinds of attention, but across the state, residents will also vote on 245 local ballot proposals.

Jonathan Oosting is the Michigan politics reporter for Bridge Magazine, and recently wrote about what else is on ballots around the state.

Minnie Forbes sitting on a couch
Doug Tribou / Michigan Radio

Grand Rapids isn't a big-league baseball town, but a living part of baseball history calls it home. 

Minnie Forbes is the last surviving owner of a Negro Leagues baseball team. She owned the Detroit Stars from 1956 to 1958. She was also one of just a handful of female owners.

people helping an injured gymast down steps
NBC Sports

With good timing and a web of connections, Larry Nassar navigated the world of elite gymnastics and hid his serial sexual abuse until his victims brought him down.

In a new book, ESPN investigative reporters John Barr and Dan Murphy detail Nassar's beginnings, demise, and the ongoing fallout from his crimes.

portrait of Donald White
Bentley Historical Library

For architects, a groundbreaking ceremony is the beginning of a vision realized. But architect Donald White needed to break new ground in a much different way to get his career started.

In the early 1930s, White became the first African-American to earn a degree from the University of Michigan's School of Architecture. He went on to become the first licensed black architect in the state.

Elijah McCoy
Bentley Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library

The U.S. Patent and Trademark office in Detroit bears the name of Elijah McCoy, a pioneering African-American inventor. McCoy was born in the mid-1840s, nearly 170 years before the office opened. McCoy had more than 50 patents to his name.

He’s best known for inventing an automatic lubricator that was used on trains.

Mark Dantonio at a podium
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

This time of year, college football fans are often buzzing about incoming recruits. But in East Lansing this week, the big news was departure. After 13 seasons, Mark Dantonio retired as Michigan State's football coach. There are questions about the timing of his announcement and the future of the program.

City street intersection and railroad crossing.
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Update: Friday, February 7, 2020

Ann Arbor has nixed a $7 million plan that would have created a railroad quiet zone. City officials say the response from residents was overwhelmingly against spending the money to end frequent freight train horns. 

pit filled with green liquid
U.S. EPA

Update: Thursday, February 6, 2020

The attorney for Gary Sayers called a single witness on Thursday, a structural engineer who testified that the buildings on the Electro-Plating Services property are structurally sound.

6th Circuit Court Judge Hala Jarbou told attorneys she wants closing arguments to be based on facts presented at trial. She ordered both sides to get a transcript of the proceedings, write their final pleadings, and make closing arguments on April 1.

Whitmer at podium
Gov. Gretchen Whitmer Twitter

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer delivered the official Democratic Party response to the State of the Union address Tuesday night.

Whitmer delivered her 10-minute rebuttal from the East Lansing High School auditorium packed with invited guests. She says numbers don’t tell the whole story of what’s happening with the US economy. She says that the stock market may be doing well, but workers are not getting fair wages and job security.

Whitmer ready with “Plan B” for road money

Jan 30, 2020
Governor Whitmer and Lt. Govenor Garlin Gilchrist
Jake Nehr / WDET

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer says she’s ready to go-it-alone to come up with money to pay for road repairs. That’s if Republicans won’t support her proposal for a fuel tax increase.

That was the message Whitmer delivered in her second State of the State speech Wednesday night.

Gretchen whitmer at a microphone
Jake Neher / WDET

Governor Gretchen Whitmer is seeking $3.5 billion in new bonds to fix crumbling roads and bridges. She unveiled the plan in her second State of the State speech Wednesday evening. She said this is her “Plan B” after Republicans rejected her proposal for a 45-cent fuel tax increase last year.

“So from now on, when you see orange barrels on a state road, slow down, and know that it’s this administration fixing the damn roads,” Whitmer said.

The new plan doesn’t require the Republican-led Legislature to sign off.

Michigan Radio

It’s a New Year and Michigan Radio has added a new voice. April Baer is the host of Stateside. She joined Doug Tribou on Morning Edition to talk about her Midwest roots and her path to Michigan Radio.

Cynthia Canty has hosted Stateside since it began in 2012, but now she's getting ready for another adventure. After 40 years in broadcasting, Cyndy is retiring. Stateside will continue, but Cyndy's final episodes are airing this week.

Ford Motor Company

As hostilities about the impeachment process continued, a moment of bipartisanship came together in Washington Tuesday. Democrats announced their support for the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement – or USMCA. The new trade deal could have significant implications for U.S. auto manufacturers.

michigan football team in circle
Courtesy Michigan Photography

Many Michiganders will grab some Thanksgiving leftovers for lunch and settle in for the annual Michigan-Ohio State football game on Saturday.

construction site
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

The ongoing state budget fight between Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the state Legislature has left a lot in limbo. The State Department of Corrections says it now has a $10 million hole in its education budget. That means a brand-new, multi-million-dollar facility being built at the state’s only prison for women will sit vacant.

woman stirs giant vat of oatmeal
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

This story is part of Michigan Radio's series Mornings in Michigan, which looks at routines and rituals that start the day across our state.

I recently spent a morning in a place most Michiganders will never go.

On a weekday in September, well before sunrise, I arrived at the Women's Huron Valley Correctional Facility in Ypsilanti with Michigan Radio Morning Edition producer Lauren Talley and intern Katie Raymond. 

Ann Arbor superintendent Jeanice Swift
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

Among the school bond proposals on local ballots Tuesday, Ann Arbor’s was by the far the most ambitious – a $1-billion bond for building improvements. The measure passed with 53% of voters saying yes. Many other communities also voted on large school bonds.

Michigan Radio’s Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with Gongwer News Editor Zach Gorchow about the top results and school funding across the state.

headshot of Becca and David
StoryCorps

David Feingold has bipolar disorder. He discussed how the disease has shaped his work as an artist and how it contributed to his divorce from his ex-wife. He spoke with his current significant other Becca Buchalter at the StoryCorps mobile booth in Flint.

two men hugging
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

After being held in a Chinese prison, a Detroit man is home. Wendell Brown was greeted by friends and family at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. He went to China to coach American football there, but an incident in a bar in 2016 led to a criminal conviction that Brown still disputes.

headshot of mother and daughter
StoryCorps

Dorothy Maxine Keely McClanahan is 95 years old. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Flint, she and her daughter, JoAnn McClanahan, talked about her memories of growing up in a large family in the city during the Great Depression.

blighted home in Detroit
Bridge Magazine

A $250-million budget to combat blight. That’s what Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan is hoping voters will approve. He wants a measure on the March 2020 ballot that would authorize the city to sell municipal bonds to cover the tab.

headshot of mother and daughter
StoryCorps

After being born to a teenage mother, Sharon Simeon was adopted as an infant. She spent 23 years trying to find her birth mother, Johnnie Mallett Caruthers. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Flint, Simeon and Mallett Caruthers talked about the roads that led them apart, and eventually, back together.

water facuet flowing into title of documentary
Flint: The Poisoning of an American City press kit

Flint was once a city of prosperity and thriving industry. Its successes were touted as an example for other U.S. cities. An old promotional film celebrating Flint's achievements in business and public education, summed it up this way:

dog swimming in pool
Doug Tribou / Michigan Radio

On a warm, sunny afternoon last week, I went to one of Ann Arbor’s city pools knowing full well I would not be allowed to swim. As I walked in,  I spotted some serious dog paddling. But the swimmer would probably just call it paddling.

headshot of Leon and Eleanor
StoryCorps

In 2003, Flint resident Leon El-Alamin was arrested for dealing drugs and gun possession. He was 19 years old. El-Alamin spent seven years in prison. He’s 38 now. He spoke to Eleanor Vassili about that experience and the M.A.D.E. Institute, the organization he founded to help people as they get out of prison. Their conversation is part of a series of StoryCorps interviews recorded in Flint.

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