Morning Edition | Michigan Radio
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Morning Edition

Weekday mornings from 5:00 - 9:00 a.m.

Weekday mornings on Michigan Radio, Doug Tribou hosts NPR's Morning Edition, the most listened-to news radio program in the country. The show brings listeners up-to-the-minute news, analysis, commentary, interviews, and coverage of the arts and sports. Morning Edition on Michigan Radio features work by our team of reporters, Doug's in-depth interviews, and observations from our sports commentator John U. Bacon. You'll also hear special features, including It's Just PoliticsStoryCorps, and Mornings in Michigan

blighted home in Detroit
Bridge Magazine

A $250-million budget to combat blight. That’s what Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan is hoping voters will approve. He wants a measure on the March 2020 ballot that would authorize the city to sell municipal bonds to cover the tab.

headshot of mother and daughter
StoryCorps

After being born to a teenage mother, Sharon Simeon was adopted as an infant. She spent 23 years trying to find her birth mother, Johnnie Mallett Caruthers. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Flint, Simeon and Mallett Caruthers talked about the roads that led them apart, and eventually, back together.

water facuet flowing into title of documentary
Flint: The Poisoning of an American City press kit

Flint was once a city of prosperity and thriving industry. Its successes were touted as an example for other U.S. cities. An old promotional film celebrating Flint's achievements in business and public education, summed it up this way:

dog swimming in pool
Doug Tribou / Michigan Radio

On a warm, sunny afternoon last week, I went to one of Ann Arbor’s city pools knowing full well I would not be allowed to swim. As I walked in,  I spotted some serious dog paddling. But the swimmer would probably just call it paddling.

headshot of Leon and Eleanor
StoryCorps

In 2003, Flint resident Leon El-Alamin was arrested for dealing drugs and gun possession. He was 19 years old. El-Alamin spent seven years in prison. He’s 38 now. He spoke to Eleanor Vassili about that experience and the M.A.D.E. Institute, the organization he founded to help people as they get out of prison. Their conversation is part of a series of StoryCorps interviews recorded in Flint.

Nicole Honeywell / Unsplash

This is the first week of school for many Michigan kids. Most classrooms share some basic features – desks, chairs, a blackboard or dry-erase board, but what makes for a good classroom? That’s a question Detroit Free Press columnist Nancy Kaffer has been asking different people in education for years. She recently got some new answers from Detroit Public Schools Community District superintendent Nikolai Vitti. Kaffer spoke to Morning Edition host Doug Tribou about what she learned. 

surveillance camera
magraphics / Adobe Stock

The new school year is here and safety is top of mind at many districts in Michigan. In recent years, school shootings across the country pushed a number of communities to fund major security overhauls.

In some districts, video software similar to controversial facial recognition technology is part of the plan.

MSU and U of M football stadiums
Flickr user Ken Lund

College football is back. With Michigan State and Michigan about to begin their seasons, Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon joined Morning Edition host Doug Tribou for a preview. 

Bentley Historical Library/Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

What makes a city? Is it the geographic location? Is it the people? The new book Vanishing Ann Arbor looks at that city's history through the lens of its downtown buildings and businesses, including many that have come down or closed up.

water faucet
Flickr user Bart / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

This year in Detroit the city water department has shut off service to nearly 12,000 accounts because of overdue bills. More than 5,000 of those are still without water. Detroit Free Press columnist Nancy Kaffer revealed the numbers in a story published Wednesday and calls the situation a humanitarian crisis. 

boys playing ga-ga ball
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

Camp Storer sits on 1,250 acres. The landscape is dotted with pine trees and tall grasses. When I arrive, sandhill cranes graze and mist rises from the fields. It’s just before 7 o’clock as I head into one of the girl’s cabins.

“Okay girls, time to get up!”

That’s 19-year-old counselor Samantha Grohowski.

“Around 7 I’ll turn my speaker on, play some music,” she says. “I usually play three songs. The first one is the least annoying and they progressively get more annoying to get them out of bed.”

African American man with facial recognition scan
Pro-stock Studio / Adobe Stock

New technology brings with it new powers and questions. Since Detroit police began using facial recognition technology, there have been questions about how if it should be used, if it should be used at all.

Update: Tuesday, July 30, 7:40 a.m. The debate about police use of facial recognition software continues in Detroit.

Experts and activists shared their concerns about the technology at a forum Monday. Some experts say their fears about the technology extend beyond its current use in Detroit.

Updated at 11:25 a.m. ET

Equifax will pay up to $700 million in fines and monetary relief to consumers over a 2017 data breach at the credit reporting bureau that affected nearly 150 million people.

The growing popularity of FaceApp — a photo filter app that delights smartphone users with its ability to transform the features of any face, like tacking on years of wrinkles — has prompted Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer to call for a federal investigation into the Russia-based company over what he says are potential national security and privacy risks to millions of Americans.

A long table surrounded by red chairs in a school classroom.
BES Photos / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

School’s out for summer, as Alice Cooper once sang. But in Flint that summer vacation is about to get a lot shorter. The city’s public schools are switching to a balanced school calendar that will start on August 7. Those lost summer vacation days will be converted into shorter breaks throughout the year.

The goal is to reduce so-called summer brain drain. But does it work?

Justin Amash official portrait
House.gov

As West Michigan Congressman Justin Amash stands alone, some are asking if he’ll join the crowded field of presidential candidates. And in one Michigan community, a local-versus-state debate about schools seems stuck at a stand-off.

Libertarian columnist and news analyst Shikha Dalmia joined Morning Edition host Doug Tribou to look at the latest in Michigan politics. 

Back of a school bus
Pixabay

In the presidential campaign, Democrat Joe Biden’s past positions on school busing have become an issue. Growing up in Alabama, Detroit Free Press columnist Nancy Kaffer was bused as a result of a desegregation lawsuit. That experience has left her with questions about the legacy of those busing policies today.

baseball stadium
Photo courtesy of HDR Architecture, Inc.

The University of Michigan baseball team finished its season just short of a national championship. In the deciding game of the College World Series final on Wednesday, Vanderbilt beat the Wolverines 8-2. U of M won Game 1, but lost two straight to the Commodores in Omaha, Nebraska.

person signing a petition while another holds a clipboard
Svetlana / Adobe Stock

You may soon be asked to sign a petition to restrict abortion in Michigan.

protesters carrying signs
File photo / Michigan Radio

As President Trump ramps up his campaign, his deportation policy drew protests in Detroit this week. And a West Michigan congressman who called for impeachment proceedings against the president has faced a protest of his own.

Libertarian columnist Shikha Dalmia joined Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou to talk about those stories, and about Attorney General Dana Nessel's decision to dismiss all criminal charges from the Flint water crisis. 

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

Today is the deadline Gov. Gretchen Whitmer set for a deal to be reached between her administration and the Benton Harbor Area Schools board over the district’s future.

college building exterior
Marygrove College

Marygrove College in Detroit will close for good this December. The school announced Wednesday it had informed its staff and 305 students of the decision. It's citing financial reasons. 

Detroit Free Press columnist Nancy Kaffer has been covering the story. She spoke to Michigan Radio’s Morning Edition host Doug Tribou about her article, “Detroit's 92-year-old Marygrove College to close in December.

sign that says "vote here"
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A state elections board is going to work on new rules to govern petition drives that want to get issues before the Legislature or on a ballot.

The Michigan Board of State Canvassers faces a complicated situation. Last year, Republicans in the Legislature adopted a law to make it harder for petition drives to succeed. Earlier this year, Democratic Attorney General Dana Nessel issued a formal opinion. It strikes down much of what Republicans enacted. Republicans are now challenging that opinion in court.

foreclosure sign outside old home
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Detroit offers people living in poverty a 100% exemption on their property taxes. It’s Detroit’s local adaption of a state law. But many Detroiters living below the poverty line don’t know about it. 

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer says leaders at Benton Harbor Area Schools will get an extra week to come up with a plan to keep the district’s high school open. Whitmer took two hours of comments and questions during a town hall with residents in Benton Harbor on Wednesday.

headshots of Michigan members of congress
Wikimedia Commons / Jodi Westrick

You have to spend money to make money ... or so the old saying goes. Most members of Michigan’s Congressional delegation are spending tens, and sometimes, hundreds of thousands of dollars through their political action committees on things like five-star hotels and baseball tickets. The politicians say it’s to help with fundraising. 

Melissa Nann Burke is the Washington Bureau reporter for the Detroit News. She spoke to Michigan Radio’s Morning Edition host Doug Tribou about her story, "Baseball tickets, ski trips: How Michigan lawmakers use little-known PACs."

whitmer speaking at podium
Zoe Clark / Michigan Radio

At the Mackinac Policy Conference, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed legislation that changes Michigan’s auto insurance law. And state Attorney General Dana Nessel set a deadline for Gov. Whitmer and Enbridge Energy to take action on the Line 5 oil and gas pipeline that runs under the Straits of Mackinac. 

John Seung-Hwan Shin / Wikimedia Commons Creative Commons license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en

  

U.S. Reps. Rashida Tlaib and Justin Amash raised questions this week in a hearing about the use of facial recognition technology by law enforcement agencies, including Detroit Police Department.

The hearing was held Wednesday by the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Reform.

classroom of kids
NeONBRAND / Unsplash

Bullying is serious issue in schools across the country. Severe bullying can have long-term effects on the victims.  Michigan law requires school districts to have anti-bullying policies and to investigate and report cases.

But when Lansing State Journal reporter Rachel Greco looked into whether districts in the Lansing area are obeying that law, she found that many are not. 

man vaping
Fotofabrika / Adobe Stock

The popularity of vaping among teenagers is going up. A University of Michigan study found there were 1.3 million more high school users in the U.S. in 2018 than in 2017.

Here in Michigan, two bills that would ban the sale of e-cigarettes and other vaping products to minors have been sent to Governor Gretchen Whitmer's desk. One of groups opposing the legislation might come as a surprise. It’s the American Cancer Society. 

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