Stateside | Michigan Radio
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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3 & 9 p.m.

Stateside covers what you need (and want) to know about Michigan. You hear stories from people across the state—from policymakers in Lansing, to entrepreneurs in Detroit, to artists in Grand Rapids. Tune in every day for in-depth conversations that matter to Michigan. Stateside is hosted by April Baer.

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There are large areas of the state experiencing drought or drought-like conditions, which poses a risk of wildfires.Credit Photo by Zoltan Tasi on UnsplashEdit | Remove

Today on Stateside, we hear about the shifting political sands in Oakland County. Also, climate change and Michigan birds. Plus, we discuss the arid conditions in much of Michigan. It’s creating a greater risk of wildfire, earlier in the season than normal.

concert
Yvette de Wit / Unsplash

On today’s Stateside, music festivals are back in business this summer. Plus, podcasters Michelle Jokisch Polo and Araceli Crescencio discuss bringing news to Michigan’s Latinx community. And, a conversation with music producer Waajeed about passing the Detroit-techno baton.

Bakpak Durden

Murals by Bakpak Durden that glaze through the streets of Russell, Brush, and Hazelwood -- covering a Detroit vs. Everybody store, the Brush Street Viaduct, and LGBT Detroit -- have illuminated the city.

A self-taught interdisciplinary artist, Durden began their work years ago, making small pieces out of items found around the house and selling them to the two people who loved them most.

The Sarah Elizabeth Ray House
The Sarah E. Ray Project

Today on Stateside, we talk to a researcher who found that the forever chemicals known as PFAS are showing up in rainfall around the Great Lakes. Then, what families should know about kids and COVID-19 as summer vacation begins. And, an effort to save the historical home of Sarah Elizabeth Ray, the Detroit civil rights activist whose U.S. Supreme Court case led to the integration of the Boblo Island ferry. 

A young man holds a rag to his head to wipe away sweat as the sun beats down on him
Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, Democrats in Lansing want to investigate the ties between people in Michigan and the January 6 Capitol insurrection. Also, with summer almost upon us, the environmental and human toll of heat waves. Plus, a conversation with queer Detroit street artist Bakpak Durden.

A sign points out a Michigan Independent Citizens Redistricting Commission meeting in Midland.
Brett Dahlberg / WCMU News

Today on Stateside, former Michigan Governor Rick Snyder’s pretrial begins in the ongoing legal battle over the Flint Water Crisis. We check in on what the committee in charge of redrawing political districts is hearing in public comments. Then, a conversation with a former head coach of the Detroit Pistons about race and politics in the NBA. Plus, the best cicada recipes for your summer cookout.

Cover of "Our Michigan! We Love the Seasons'
Sleeping Bear Press

Walk into the children’s section of pretty much any bookstore or library in Michigan and you’re likely to find Gijsbert van Frankenhuyzen’s work staring back at you from the shelf. Even if you don’t know his name, you probably would recognize the cover to the first book he illustrated, The Legend of Sleeping Bear by Kathy-jo Wargin. There are puffy black bear shaped clouds floating over Sleeping Bear Dunes, all of it luminescent orange from a setting Lake Michigan sun.

two cars in a rear ending accident
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

  

Today, on Stateside, we discuss changes to medical care under Michigan’s reworked no-fault auto insurance law, and what it means for those in a catastrophic accident. Also, the artisitc journey of Michigan-based children's book illustrator Gijsbert van Frakenguyzen. Plus, long-time journalist John Gallagher talks about entrepreneurship and reinvention in Detroit.

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Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

Courtesy of Sacha Schneider

Lord Huron’s latest record, "Long Lost," isn’t only an album. It’s a hazy, echo-filled history, populated with a cast of mysterious, hard-luck characters and layered with ghostly fragments of musical eras gone by. Guitarist and lead singer Ben Schneider, who grew up in Michigan, said the band aimed for the record, released last month, to feel like a nostalgic classic lost to time.

Senator Peters talking
www.peters.senate.gov

Today, on Stateside, Democratic U.S. Senator Gery Peters discussed what we still don’t know about the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Plus, how Matt Schembechler’s story of abuse at the hands of Dr. Robert Anderson changes the game for University of Michigan football fans. 

Ford Motor Company's headquarters in Dearborn.
Ford Motor Company

Ford introduced the world this week to the Maverick — a smaller, hybrid truck. Concurrently, the demand for the electric F-150 Lightning is soaring with 100,000 pre-orders placed. This suggests new possibilities for Ford, an iconic Michigan brand and the global leader in trucks. 

Automotive reporter, Sonari Glinton, is the host of Now What’s Next. He thinks that the stereotypical consumer for electric vehicles is now changing with the introduction of vehicles such as the Maverick and F-150 Lightning. 

University of Michigan Stadium
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, the son of longtime University of Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler went on record to say that he, too, was abused by former UM doctor Robert Anderson. Also, a review of this week’s big auto industry reveal: Ford’s new hybrid mini-truck. Plus, one art fan’s collection, and the personal statement it reflects about gay identity.

Mandi Wright / Detroit Free Press

Today, on Stateside, let’s dive into a reflection on the HIV/AIDS crisis and how it relates to the current pandemic. We’ll look into COVID infections, vaccinations, and health care equity. Plus, we talk about the year 1971 that gave rise to Marvin Gaye’s masterwork --  What’s Going On. Lastly, if you're in search of a vacation, we’re rediscovering Idlewild, where generations of Black Michiganders went for vacation and respite.

Illustration of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Today on Stateside, a look at where Michigan stands with COVID-19 infections, vaccinations, and power machinations. Also, an exploration of writer Ernest Hemingway’s summers in northern Michigan. Plus, a West Michigan musician discusses how performance and therapy intersect in her work, and how her creative life has changed amid the pandemic.

Courtesy of Tribune Media

Contemporary innovations like virtual school, wristwatches that are televisions, and genetically modified foods are pretty familiar concepts to us today. But back in the 1950s and ‘60s, Michigan artist Arthur Radebaugh dazzled millions of people every week with illustrations of inventions like these, as well as other outlandish visions of the future. His work appeared in a syndicated Sunday comic strip called Closer Than We Think, which debuted at a time when the expansive potential of technology captivated Americans’ attention. And while some of his art still looks like science fiction now, some of his creative, futuristic designs aren’t fantasy anymore — they’re reality.

photo of Warda Bouguettaya crossing her arms.
Warda Bougettaya

Today, on Stateside, changes to Michigan’s election laws move through the legislature. Plus, one Detroit chef talks about seizing the moment to expand her business, and why she still makes time for the kitchen. 

Book cover of "Gut Botany"
Wayne State University Press

The strangeness and beauty of bodies and how we live in them is a theme that weaves itself throughout poet Petra Kuppers’ work. These are intensely personal interests for Kuppers. She’s a University of Michigan professor who lectures on writing, disability culture, and queer culture. Kuppers uses a wheelchair and lives with chronic pain. And she says the process of poetry— observing and distilling her experiences through writing— is a healing one. 

Unsplash

Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced her plan to spend more than a billion dollars in federal money. A reporter talks us through some of the details of the governor's proposal. Also, as more people continue to receive their COVID-19 vaccines, a medical historian discusses how we’ll know when the pandemic is over. Plus, a poet tells us about her latest collection, which explores the strangeness and beauty of bodies.

Courtesy of Penguin Random House

As the 19th century began, two Shawnee brothers rose to prominence in the Great Lakes region. The younger sibling, Tenskwatawa, was a spiritual leader known as “The Prophet.” His older brother was Tecumseh, a renowned statesman and military commander who organized a pan-Indian confederation of several thousand, including many from Michigan. A new biography released in October 2020 details the experiences of the brothers and their intertwined visions for an alliance of Native tribes, unified in spirituality and resistance to the white settlers who were encroaching on their lands and lives.

a lot of cars lined up outside the detroit windsor tunnel
Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today, on Stateside, the mayor of Windsor, Ontario has a creative solution for getting excess Detroit vaccine doses to Canadians: a vaccine clinic in the Detroit-Windsor tunnel. Plus, a historian from the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians talks about the enduring legacy of Tecumseh, the Shawnee leader who united Native tribes against settler expansion. And, we dig into the job market during the pandemic recovery. 

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Staying safe inside for the past 15 months has done a number on most people. Anxious for a change of scenery, many Michiganders have been perusing the housing market these past few months.

Even if it’s just the casual late-night Zillow rabbit hole, you’ve probably noticed that the current market is on the fritz. Buyers are paying significantly over the asking price, forgoing inspections, and paying in cash, creating an unprecedented housing market for buyers and sellers.

Unsplash

Today on Stateside, Danny Fenster, a journalist from Michigan, has been detained by authorities in Myanmar. His brother discussed the ongoing efforts to secure his release. Also, a columnist from the Detroit Free Press discusses the editorial board’s pursuits of criminal justice reform in Michigan. And, a look at Tecumseh’s vision for a sovereign pan-Native Nation in the 19th century, including the role he had in mind for Michigan.

a team picture of the women's lacrosse team at cass tech
Courtesy of Summer Aldred

2020 was supposed to be an exciting year for women’s lacrosse players at Cass Technical High School in Detroit.

woman wearing "defund police" mask
Lester Graham

A bipartisan package of police reform bills are in the state Senate. Advocates are aiming for a broader approach to major systemic failures in policing. But the sponsors of these bills say incremental progress may be fundamental progress in 2021. But does it go far enough? Today, we’ll hear from two state Senators, who are Black, about what’s in the proposed legislation and where their expectations stand.

Headshot of high school students, Jane and Nawaff.
Courtesy Photos

There’s never been a last day of school quite like this one. Students and teachers throughout Michigan are nearing the finish line, with many keen to put the 2020-2021 pandemic school year behind them. Stateside caught up with two high schoolers about how the COVID-19 public health crisis has shaped their education and shifted their perspectives this year. We’ll be using just their first names to protect their privacy as minors.

michigan state capitol building in lansing, mi
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, a state lawmaker discusses police reform measures under consideration in the Michigan Senate. Also, a look at what’s driving the housing market — and making it difficult for buyers to navigate right now. Plus, two high school students discuss wrapping up the pandemic school year.

pork chops on a grill
bitslammer / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

With the long holiday weekend ahead, many of us are thinking about grilling and sharing a meal with loved one for the first time in more than a year. Today on Stateside, we start with food and drink. First, how one beloved Detroit barbecue joint has been surviving the COVID-19 pandemic. Then a contribution from the Cheers! team. Also, two writers discuss putting together a special fiction and poetry edition of the Detroit Metro Times. Plus, an award-winning poet reflects on exploring the nuances of love and pain for Black Americans.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

You know it's summer when you see Bell's Oberon hit your local grocer’s shelves. It’s one of the signs that summer is finally coming to Michigan. One of the very first Cheers! episodes that Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings and I did almost five years ago featured a drink called the Oberon Sour. It was a hit.

black legged tick
Adobe Stock

It is not your imagination, ticks are beyond plentiful in Michigan this year. So, what’s behind this boom in population? And what can we do to keep ourselves safe from the disease-spreading pests? On today's episode, we get a couple of tick experts to answer your questions.

Logan Chadde

Earlier this month, the Ann Arbor Art Fair’s organizers made the choice to cancel the event for a second year in a row due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. But, after Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced outdoor capacity restrictions will be lifted June 1, the event’s directors decided the fair can now move forward.

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