Stateside | Michigan Radio
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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 & 10 p.m.

Stateside covers what you need (and want) to know about Michigan. You hear stories from people across the state—from policymakers in Lansing, to entrepreneurs in Detroit, to artists in Grand Rapids. Tune in every day for in-depth conversations about what matters in Michigan. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri).

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Joel Sanderson at an iron forge
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we talk to Paul Mitchell, who represents Michigan’s 10th District, about his view on the impeachment proceedings against President Trump. Plus, we talk to one of the longest-serving members of the Capitol press corps about his nearly five decades covering Michigan politics.

user dig downtown detroit / Flickr

Today on Stateside, we look at what the resignation of Wayne State University's Board of Governors chairwoman means for the school’s divided leadership. Plus, we wrap up our series on billionaire influence in Michigan with a look at Grand Rapids and a conversation with the author of Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World.

Much of the corn grown in the U.S. today is genetically engineered to resist the herbicide Roundup.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, Detroit has hired a new director for its Animal Care and Control Department after the fatal mulling of a nine-year-old girl earlier this year. We heard how the department plans to turn things around. Plus, experts estimate that postpartum mood disorders like anxiety and depression impact as many as 1 in 5 mothers, but stigma stops many of them from getting help. We talked to two women trying to change that. 

baby in white cloth
Unsplash

The birth of a new baby is an exciting time. Family and friends come over to fawn over the new baby. They bring gifts and take turns holding the new addition. But what happens when a mother doesn't feel that same joy—when she feels disconnected from all the excitement around her?

Rep. Larry Inman (R-Williamsburg)
Michigan House of Representatives

The trial of state Representative Larry Inman ended in a mistrial Tuesday. The lawmaker narrowly avoided a criminal conviction.

The outside of the Crowley's department store in a black and white photo
Courtesy of Michael Hauser

Today on Stateside, a new investigative report revealed that top exectutives at a firm contracted by the city of Flint knew there was a problem with lead contamination in the water system, but never alerted the public. Plus, a look at the golden era of downtown department stores in Detroit, and what their eventual demise tells us about how the retail landscape has changed. 

Michigan's Unemployment Insurance Agency (UIA) has wrongly accused tens of thousands of people of cheating on their unemployment claims.
Bytemarks / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, we heard about the latest update on a lawsuit filed in 2015 on behalf of the tens of thousands of Michiganders wrongly accused of filing fraudulent unemployment claims. Plus, the new director of the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency talked about her plan to get more of Michigan's 600,000 vets connected to the benefits they need.

microscope
Unsplash


Veteran public radio journalist April Baer is joining Michigan Radio to host the station’s popular Stateside talk show. She will take the helm of the show beginning Monday, January 6, 2020. 

April Baer is replacing Cynthia Canty, who has been the host of the award winning show for the past seven years and is retiring later this month. 

michigan.gov

Today on Stateside, a team from Emory University is in Michigan this week to take blood samples from people who were exposed to polybrominated biphenyls—or PBBs—in the 1970s. Plus, is new technology the key to fighting climate change—or is a radical cultural shift needed? 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

There is so much to catch your eye: Tiki statues, tiki mugs, tiki décor of every description, and more than a dash of 1960s living room kitsch. Max’s South Seas Hideaway is the newest tiki bar in Grand Rapids and the epitome of a “tiki palace” in Michigan.

Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings sat down with co-owner Mark Sellers in a cozy little corner filled with tiki art and mid-century suburban furniture to talk to him about the two-story tiki bar and restaurant.

Group of men sitting on a hill
U.S. Library of Congress

Today on Stateside, an old industrial site contaminated with uranium since the World War II has partially collapsed into the Detroit River. Plus, a group of West Michigan musicians have brought old Michigan folk songs once sung by sailors and lumberjacks back to life.

washed away dunes and a deck perched on the edge
Courtesy of Jim Davlin

Today on Stateside, Great Lakes water levels are at record or near-record highs, leading to dramatic shoreline erosion and threatening lakeshore properties. Plus, the Detroit origins of the spiral cut ham, a holiday dinner staple. 

Michigan State Capitol Building
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, there are just a few weeks left in the 2019 legislative session, but Governor Gretchen Whitmer and GOP lawmakers have yet to reach a deal on the state budget. Plus, a group of West Michigan musicians come together on a compilation album to raise money for Grand Rapids singer-songwriter Ralston Bowles, whose wife is battling cancer.

glass jar of marijuana flower on a glass counter
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we get a preview of State Representative Larry Inman’s upcoming corruption trial in federal court. 

A stack of books on a table.
Unsplash

The word “education” doesn’t appear in the United States Constitution, but should students be guaranteed a basic level of literacy in order to fully participate in American democracy? 

Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we hear about the plan for a unique “net-zero” community in Ann Arbor. Plus, dispelling the stereotype that Michigan wine can't compete on the world stage. 

Rep. Larry Inman (R-Williamsburg)
Michigan House of Representatives

A law to recall politicians needs to be changed. That’s the assessment of a group trying to recall Representative Larry Inman (R-Williamsburg). He faces federal charges of soliciting bribes, attempted extortion and lying to the FBI.

The state changed the recall requirements in 2012. The period of time to collect signatures was cut from 90 days to 60 days. A recall campaign cannot begin until the elected official has served six months in office.

A sign indicating a "Michigan Left".
Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today on Stateside, the organizer of a recall drive against a Traverse City state representative says Michigan’s recall process stifles citizen voices. Plus, Michigan winemakers are hoping to move the image of the state’s wines beyond “sweet” and “sweeter."

people cheering glasses of red wine
Unsplash

It's that time of year when people are stocking up on wine for festive dinners and holiday parties. Despite a sizable winemaking industry in the state, Michigan wine often is stereotyped as being overly sweet, and not on par with products from other areas of the country.

But winemakers and sommeliers around the state want to break that stereotype, and maybe even convince you to pick up a Michigan-made wine for your holiday table. 

A map of Michigan's Congressional districts.
Wikimedia Commons

Today on Stateside, a federal judge delivered a setback to Michigan Republicans suing to stop the state from moving forward on a voter-approved redistricting commission. Plus, why the old political belief that urban voters swing Democratic and the suburbs vote Republican is changing.

Groceries, including milk, eggs and produce, sitting on a counter.
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, what newly-released emails between state officials reveal about the behind-the-scenes negotiations that allowed federally-protected gray wolves to be killed in the Upper Peninsula. Plus, on the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's assassination, a look into the former president's long list of health problems and why they were hidden from public view.

Running faucet
Melissa Benmark / Michigan Radio

In the past several years, dozens of communities across Michigan have learned their drinking water is contaminated with per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. This group of chemicals, commonly referred to as PFAS, are “forever chemicals.” They persist in the environment and in the bodies of people regularly exposed to them without breaking down.

BERNT ROSTAD / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today on Stateside, we recap the Michigan congressional delegation's reactions to the impeachment inquiry. Plus, following the recent settlement of a discrimination lawsuit against Founders Brewing Co., we talk to people of color in Michigan's food and craft beer scene about its lack of diversity.

a brain scane
Adobe Stock

How do you diagnose death?

For the last several decades, doctors have used brain death, defined as the complete and irreversible absence of all brain function, to determine when someone is legally dead. But in two recent cases in Michigan, both involving children, families have pushed back on doctors' diagnoses of brain death. 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Thanksgiving is less than a week away. Yikes!

So what do you offer your guests to drink?

“You'll see a lot of guides of what wine to pair with Thanksgiving dinner. And there's no right answer, right? Because the Thanksgiving table is so diverse, there's so many different food items on it, you're never going to have a perfect pairing. So cocktails can be a different way to go,” Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings said.

a young black boy raises his hand at a desk with a book on it
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, General Motors is suing rival automaker Fiat Chrysler. We’ll hear about how corruption charges against the UAW and Fiat Chrysler are at the heart of the lawsuit. Plus, a case before a federal appeals court looks at whether some Detroit students’ constitutional rights were violated by subpar learning environments and instruction.

record player
James Sutton / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, fewer people are stepping up to serve as volunteer firefighters. What does that mean for the safety of Michigan communities? Plus, how best to support non-traditional students in their career paths.

A view across the devastated neighborhood of Richmond in Halifax, Nova Scotia after the Halifax Explosion in 1917. The steamship Imo, one of the ships in the collision that triggered the explosion, can be seen aground on the far side of the harbor.
Wikimedia Commons

Today on Stateside, how anemic state funding and fewer students in the classroom are posing challenges for Michigan’s public universities. Plus, why some physicians choose to practice direct primary care.

bus stop sign
fabi k / Creative Commons

Today on Stateside, a reboot of efforts to expand regional transit in Southeast Michigan. Plus, as the state tackles PFAS contamination, we look at the lessons missed in the 1973 PBB crisis in St. Louis, Michigan.

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