Stateside | Michigan Radio
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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 & 10 p.m.

Stateside covers what you need (and want) to know about Michigan. You hear stories from people across the state—from policymakers in Lansing, to entrepreneurs in Detroit, to artists in Grand Rapids. Tune in every day for in-depth conversations about what matters in Michigan. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri).

Subscribe to Stateside on Apple Podcasts or Google Play.

To register to attend the Nov. 21 Stateside Live show in Ferndale, click here.

Whiskey Point, at the west end of the harbor at Beaver Island.
Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we hear the latest from Lansing after Governor Whitmer met with top Republican leaders in the state Legislature. Plus, what Michigan can learn from Norway’s prison and mental health systems. 

a waiter holds a plate of food
Louis Hansel / Unsplash

 


Today on Stateside, between anemic state funding and fewer people in the classroom, many of Michigan’s public universities are facing challenging times. Plus, a new initiative at the University of Michigan looks to provide evidence-based training on how to prevent school violence.

red lockers in a close up shot
Pixabay

 


In the wake of multiple mass school shootings in recent years, the question of how to reduce violence and make schools safer has become a pressing one. Answering that question will be the goal of a brand new national research and training center at the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

An open book that says "Veto" in red stamped with red ink pad next to it
Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, an update on the latest from Lansing as state House and Senate Republicans try to undo some of Governor Whitmer's 147 line-item vetoes. Plus, a former UAW official calls on the union to clean house.

doctor holding stethoscope with arms crossed
Unsplash

Before insurance companies, and co-pays, and filing claims, the relationship between doctors and patients was simple. Those who needed medical care would visit their doctor’s office or request a house call. Once that care was provided, the doctor was paid directly.

Some physicians are bringing that model into the 21st century by offering direct primary care to their patients on a subscription basis. 

A U.S. Census Bureau form sent to a Michigan address last year
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, as the UAW strike against General Motors begins its fourth week, we hear from one striker on the picket line. Plus, how Governor Whitmer’s line item vetoes will impact charter schools and autism services in Michigan. 

cbd oil
Tinnakorn / Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, the potential of the cannabis compound CBD as a treatment for people with chronic pain. Plus, a study out of North Carolina State University breaks down why the tax incentives states use to lure businesses might not be paying off.

a piggy bank, a stack of one dollar bills, and a stethoscope sit on a woodgrain table
FLICKR USER 401(K) / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, top United Auto Workers union leaders are now working with federal investigators on the probe into corruption at the UAW. Plus, we talk to the Detroiter who is just one country away from having visited every United Nations recognized country. She is aiming to be the first black woman to do so. 

Jodi Westrick

Michigan Radio's Bryce Huffman, creator and host of a new podcast Same Same Different, joined Stateside to talk about the launch of the podcast and what listeners can expect to gain from it.

Throughout the five episodes, Huffman and guests will explore issues around identity and how to survive “otherness,” which he describes as “that feeling that you’re different, and sometimes even less than, the people around you.” 

Debbie Dingell and Fred Upton
Wikicommons

 

Name-calling. Punching back. Finger-pointing. It's what we've come to expect out of Washington.

U.S. Representatives Fred Upton (R-6th District) and Debbie Dingell (D-12th District) are calling for a return to civility and collegiality at the nation's Capitol, and in America more broadly. 

They co-authored an op-ed in the Detroit News earlier this year, writing "A vibrant democratic republic depends on vigorous debate — but also recognizes the importance of compromise." 

Stateside spoke with Dingell and Upton Wednesday morning ahead of an appearance at the Detroit Economic Club.

An open book that says "Veto" in red stamped with red ink pad next to it
Adobe Stock

 


Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer explains the reasoning behind her 147 line-item vetoes in the state budget she signed Monday night. Plus, Congresswoman Debbie Dingell and Congressman Fred Upton talk about civility in an era of partisanship and division. 

Philosopher Elizabeth Anderson stands in front of ivy covered wall
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, how Governor Gretchen Whitmer used line-item vetoes to retool the state budget crafted by the Republican-controlled Legislature. Plus, we speak to the superintendent of a rural school district that could be the first in Michigan to let staff carry guns.

a group of students raising their hands
Nicole Honeywill / Unsplash

 


Today on Stateside, the state budget needs to be approved by Governor Gretchen Whitmer tonight to avoid a partial government shutdown. But the governor has been vocal about her displeasure with the bills sent to her by the state Legislature. So what are her options? Plus, how can Michigan do more to recruit and retain a diverse teaching staff? 

A black woman teacher stands at a white board in front of a group of young children
Adobe Stock

There’s a distinct lack of diversity among Michigan’s educators. In districts across the state, just 6% of public school teachers are black. To fix that, you'll need more black students choosing to pursue education degrees in college. So, what is keeping them from doing so? And how can we change that?    

Prison fence barbed wire
Kevin Rosseel / morguefile

 


Today on Stateside, how the United Auto Worker's strike of General Motors is hitting workers' household budgets and the broader economy. Plus, the deadline for a state budget is October 1. Will Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the GOP-led state legislature be able to strike a deal before then and avoid a partial government shutdown? 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

It’s fall and there’s a hint of it in the air.

“It’s definitely getting into the season where I like to think about fall flavors in my cocktails,” said Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings.

Among the bottles in front of her was one of moonshine.

corner of a chessboard with black pieces set up
Pixabay

Today on Stateside, what impact does the impeachment inquiry into President Trump have on the auto industry? Plus, a new memoir about the price people pay when they are displaced from their true roots, generation after generation.

a black and white photo of actor Buster Keaton reading a book
International Buster Keaton Society

 


Today on Stateside, the GOP-controlled Michigan Legislature passed a new budget. Governor Gretchen Whitmer declared it "a mess." What are her options now? Plus, a Detroit man returns home after being incarcerated in China for three years.

white woman smiling in front of foliage
Courtesy of Logan Vear

 


The constant barrage of news about climate change, drinking water contamination, and pollution in the Great Lakes region can feel overwhelming. If you care, it’s hard to know what to do or where to start.

That's where Stateside's new series comes in. We're featuring ordinary people who identified a problem – no matter how big or small – and chose to act. 

Two people playing a video game
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, Democratic Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin has been hesitant to call for impeachment of President Trump in the past. But she says allegations involving Trump's conversation with the Ukranian president, if true, would change her mind. Plus, why universities are embracing video games as the newest collegiate sport. 

a group of young girls and one adult woman holding skateboards and posing for the camera.
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

Skateboarding has long been associated with graffiti-covered parks and Vans-clad teenage boys, but a program at the Ann Arbor Skatepark is working to change that stereotype. 

The Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island.
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, the UAW strike against General Motors is stretching into week two. What does that mean for the Michigan economy? Plus, craft beer is big business in Michigan, but some small craft brewers say current state law is preventing them from expanding. 

A beer sits on a wooden bartop
Unsplash

 


If you've purchased beer lately, you've probably noticed the local craft beer section has grown in your grocery store. There's been a rapid expansion of the craft brewing industry in Michigan over the past decade. 

Michigan is the fourth-largest beer state in the nation. Currently, there are more than 350 breweries making a huge variety of beers. But some small brewers say that number may not be as big as it could be, and they say state law makes it hard for them to grow their business.

Pontiac Silverdome demolition
Tony Brown / Michigan Radio

 


Today on Stateside, students across Michigan take to the streets to voice their concerns about climate change. Plus, the Pontiac Silverdome may be developed into an Amazon distribution center.

A group of elementary school children hold signs at the Washtenaw County protest.
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

 

“Climate strikes” are being held around the world today, including here in Michigan. The youth-led movement aims to pressure corporations and governments to do more to reduce the greenhouse gases that are causing climate change.

aerial view of little caesars arena
Tony Brown / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, as a federal corruption probe into the United Auto Workers union focuses on UAW president Gary Jones, some in the union are reportedly questioning his future there. Plus, a doctor warns caution in the new era of legal cannabis.

a mosquito filled with blood on the tip of a human finger
User: Oregon State University / Flickr CC / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

Today on Stateside, what you need to know about the outbreak of a deadly mosquito-borne virus in Michigan. Plus, the growing number of cities in Michigan designating themselves "promise zones" and offering tuition assistance to their high school graduates.  

Samantha Forsyth and Grace Trudell
Sam Corey / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, what does the ongoing United Auto Workers strike against General Motors tell us about the role of American labor in the nation's economy today? Plus, two women at opposite ends of the same career path talk about what it takes to succeed in the male-dominated electrical trade.

Baby's breath, an invasive flower affecting the Great Lakes sand dunes
Sarah Lamar / Grand Valley State University

Today on Stateside, 46,000 General Motors factors workers are on strike after the United Auto Workers union and GM failed to reach a contract agreement this weekend. Plus, a popular flower in floral arrangements, baby's breath is actually an invasive species that is damaging coastal dune ecosystems around the Great Lakes. 

headshot of Valorie Kondos Field
Courtesy of Valorie Kondos Field

 


Michigan was ground zero for a scandal rocked the world of gymnastics and revealed widespread athlete abuse in the sport. In January 2018, hundreds of young women delivered blistering impact statements at the sentencing hearings for serial pedophile Larry Nassar in Ingham and Eaton County courtrooms. 

Michigan State University, USA Gymnastics, and the U.S. Olympic Committee were all called out for failing to protect young athletes. Private gyms and coaches across the country have also been investigated for abusive behavior.

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