Stateside | Michigan Radio
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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3 & 9 p.m.

Stateside covers what you need (and want) to know about Michigan. You hear stories from people across the state—from policymakers in Lansing, to entrepreneurs in Detroit, to artists in Grand Rapids. Tune in every day for in-depth conversations that matter to Michigan. Stateside is hosted by April Baer.

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Courtesy of Tribune Media

Contemporary innovations like virtual school, wristwatches that are televisions, and genetically modified foods are pretty familiar concepts to us today. But back in the 1950s and ‘60s, Michigan artist Arthur Radebaugh dazzled millions of people every week with illustrations of inventions like these, as well as other outlandish visions of the future. His work appeared in a syndicated Sunday comic strip called Closer Than We Think, which debuted at a time when the expansive potential of technology captivated Americans’ attention. And while some of his art still looks like science fiction now, some of his creative, futuristic designs aren’t fantasy anymore — they’re reality.

photo of Warda Bouguettaya crossing her arms.
Warda Bougettaya

Today, on Stateside, changes to Michigan’s election laws move through the legislature. Plus, one Detroit chef talks about seizing the moment to expand her business, and why she still makes time for the kitchen. 

Book cover of "Gut Botany"
Wayne State University Press

The strangeness and beauty of bodies and how we live in them is a theme that weaves itself throughout poet Petra Kuppers’ work. These are intensely personal interests for Kuppers. She’s a University of Michigan professor who lectures on writing, disability culture, and queer culture. Kuppers uses a wheelchair and lives with chronic pain. And she says the process of poetry— observing and distilling her experiences through writing— is a healing one. 

Unsplash

Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced her plan to spend more than a billion dollars in federal money. A reporter talks us through some of the details of the governor's proposal. Also, as more people continue to receive their COVID-19 vaccines, a medical historian discusses how we’ll know when the pandemic is over. Plus, a poet tells us about her latest collection, which explores the strangeness and beauty of bodies.

Courtesy of Penguin Random House

As the 19th century began, two Shawnee brothers rose to prominence in the Great Lakes region. The younger sibling, Tenskwatawa, was a spiritual leader known as “The Prophet.” His older brother was Tecumseh, a renowned statesman and military commander who organized a pan-Indian confederation of several thousand, including many from Michigan. A new biography released in October 2020 details the experiences of the brothers and their intertwined visions for an alliance of Native tribes, unified in spirituality and resistance to the white settlers who were encroaching on their lands and lives.

a lot of cars lined up outside the detroit windsor tunnel
Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today, on Stateside, the mayor of Windsor, Ontario has a creative solution for getting excess Detroit vaccine doses to Canadians: a vaccine clinic in the Detroit-Windsor tunnel. Plus, a historian from the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians talks about the enduring legacy of Tecumseh, the Shawnee leader who united Native tribes against settler expansion. And, we dig into the job market during the pandemic recovery. 

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Staying safe inside for the past 15 months has done a number on most people. Anxious for a change of scenery, many Michiganders have been perusing the housing market these past few months.

Even if it’s just the casual late-night Zillow rabbit hole, you’ve probably noticed that the current market is on the fritz. Buyers are paying significantly over the asking price, forgoing inspections, and paying in cash, creating an unprecedented housing market for buyers and sellers.

Unsplash

Today on Stateside, Danny Fenster, a journalist from Michigan, has been detained by authorities in Myanmar. His brother discussed the ongoing efforts to secure his release. Also, a columnist from the Detroit Free Press discusses the editorial board’s pursuits of criminal justice reform in Michigan. And, a look at Tecumseh’s vision for a sovereign pan-Native Nation in the 19th century, including the role he had in mind for Michigan.

a team picture of the women's lacrosse team at cass tech
Courtesy of Summer Aldred

2020 was supposed to be an exciting year for women’s lacrosse players at Cass Technical High School in Detroit.

woman wearing "defund police" mask
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

A bipartisan package of police reform bills are in the state Senate. Advocates are aiming for a broader approach to major systemic failures in policing. But the sponsors of these bills say incremental progress may be fundamental progress in 2021. But does it go far enough? Today, we’ll hear from two state Senators, who are Black, about what’s in the proposed legislation and where their expectations stand.

Headshot of high school students, Jane and Nawaff.
Courtesy Photos

There’s never been a last day of school quite like this one. Students and teachers throughout Michigan are nearing the finish line, with many keen to put the 2020-2021 pandemic school year behind them. Stateside caught up with two high schoolers about how the COVID-19 public health crisis has shaped their education and shifted their perspectives this year. We’ll be using just their first names to protect their privacy as minors.

michigan state capitol building in lansing, mi
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, a state lawmaker discusses police reform measures under consideration in the Michigan Senate. Also, a look at what’s driving the housing market — and making it difficult for buyers to navigate right now. Plus, two high school students discuss wrapping up the pandemic school year.

pork chops on a grill
bitslammer / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

With the long holiday weekend ahead, many of us are thinking about grilling and sharing a meal with loved one for the first time in more than a year. Today on Stateside, we start with food and drink. First, how one beloved Detroit barbecue joint has been surviving the COVID-19 pandemic. Then a contribution from the Cheers! team. Also, two writers discuss putting together a special fiction and poetry edition of the Detroit Metro Times. Plus, an award-winning poet reflects on exploring the nuances of love and pain for Black Americans.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

You know it's summer when you see Bell's Oberon hit your local grocer’s shelves. It’s one of the signs that summer is finally coming to Michigan. One of the very first Cheers! episodes that Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings and I did almost five years ago featured a drink called the Oberon Sour. It was a hit.

black legged tick
Adobe Stock

It is not your imagination, ticks are beyond plentiful in Michigan this year. So, what’s behind this boom in population? And what can we do to keep ourselves safe from the disease-spreading pests? On today's episode, we get a couple of tick experts to answer your questions.

Logan Chadde

Earlier this month, the Ann Arbor Art Fair’s organizers made the choice to cancel the event for a second year in a row due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. But, after Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced outdoor capacity restrictions will be lifted June 1, the event’s directors decided the fair can now move forward.

tick on a leaf
Erik Karits / Unsplash

Today, on Stateside, why a growing population of ticks is invading lower Michigan. Plus, the popular Ann Arbor Art Fair reopens this summer, and artists are lining up to participate. 

Courtesy of Mamba Hamissi

Baobab Fare, a new restaurant launched amid pandemic-related capacity restrictions this year, has quickly caught Detroiters’ attention. The business offers sumptuous East African dishes like flash-fried fish with fresh corn salad, beef simmered with tomatoes paired with peanut-stewed spinach, and creamy dessert pudding made with avocado and passion fruit. Co-founder and CEO Mamba Hamissi, who came to Michigan from Burundi as a refugee less than a decade ago, said love is a key part of the restaurant’s menu and atmosphere.

The Detroit skyline as seen from across the Detroit River.
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, with an influx of cash from the 2021 stimulus bill, Mayor Duggan has big plans for Detroit. We talk with a reporter about the proposed spending plan for a city in recovery. Plus, infrastructure week never ends. A new book by a Michigan journalist focuses on “bridging” the gap in a polarized America.

Courtesy of Rentschler's Studio photograph collection, Bentley Image Bank, Bentley Historical Library

Back in 1934, the University of Michigan and Georgia Tech football teams met in a game at Michigan Stadium. Ahead of the event, Georgia Tech made a demand of the U of M athletic director, legendary football coach Fielding Yost: bench Michigan’s Black football player, Willis Ward, or Georgia Tech would refuse to compete. Yost agreed to the racist request and barred Ward from playing and from the stadium that day.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A twelve bill police reform package goes before a state legislative committee this week.

The Senate Judiciary and Public Safety committee is expected to take up the package Thursday morning.

The bills address a wide-range of issues, from use of excessive force to search warrants.

protests, black lives matter, police, police force, police training
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, a year after the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer, we’ll hear about the police reform bills moving through the state Legislature. And we’ll talk to an activist who has been pushing for Michigan police departments to deal with racial bias in traffic stops. Plus, why there’s a push to rename the University of Michigan’s Yost Ice Arena.

gretchen whitmer sitting at table
michigan.gov

Today on Stateside, Governor Whitmer is in hot water for violating her own COVID-19 safety guidelines. Plus, how Detroit's air pollution is impacting its citizen. And, how the state is planning to help students returning to school after a year at home.

picture of Marvin Gaye smiling
Public Domain

Musician Marvin Gaye took a creative leap of faith 50 years ago when he released one of the most enduring works of the 20th century: his 1971 album What’s Going On. On the anniversary of the album’s release, a group of journalists, music aficionados, and educators join Stateside to reflect on the community that gave rise to Gaye’s masterpiece, and on the record’s enduring legacy today.

Unsplash

Today on Stateside, after more than a year of masking up and physical distancing, Governor Gretchen Whitmer has set an end date to pandemic restrictions. But many businesses say they still need more clarity. Also, an ACLU report says U.S. Customs and Border Protection is extending its reach far beyond the actual border with Canada. Plus, a preview of a new PBS documentary looking at Hamtramck’s evolving political landscape.

Courtesy of Detroit Under Fire

Digital tools, which allow people to show one another what’s going on in their lives in real time, have shifted how Americans talk about police brutality and other police misconduct. Members of the public can now record and share law enforcement abuses more often than they could back before the advent of smartphones.

But the pattern of police violence toward Black Americans existed long before the digital age, and now, a new exhibition called Detroit Under Fire: Police Violence, Crime Politics, and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Civil Rights Era documents a portion of that history in an online setting, cataloging Detroit Police Department abuses from 1957 to 1973.

The University of Michigan football stadium
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, the Ford F-150 Lightning marks the company's first foray into the electric truck market. What should consumers expect? Plus, a new exhibition tracks the killing of Black Detroiters by police during the height of the civil rights movement in the 1960s and 1970s. And, how a Michigan GOP plan to change higher education funding would impact state colleges and universities. 

A black F-150 from 2020
Ford Media Center

Today on Stateside, President Joe Biden visited Michigan on Tuesday to tour the Ford that will produce the new all-electric F-150 Lightning. Large crowds of protesters in Dearborn wanted to draw attention to something else though: Biden’s handling of the violence between Hamas and Israel in the Gaza Strip. Plus, we’ll talk about how Michigan’s native trumpeter swan went from nearly extinct to a conservation success story.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio


buckets full of cloth masks
Tami Davis

To mask or not to mask? Now that Governor Gretchen Whitmer has reoriented her benchmarks on COVID-19 restrictions to align with the CDC, questions remain with businesses and individuals about when masking is appropriate. Today on Stateside, an update on mask mandates from Lansing, a conversation with a small business owner on what she will do at her store, and a UM professor emeritus on the line between mandate and personal responsibility. Plus, we hear from a Saugatuck author on his new novel.

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