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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3 & 9 p.m.

Stateside covers what you need (and want) to know about Michigan. You hear stories from people across the state—from policymakers in Lansing, to entrepreneurs in Detroit, to artists in Grand Rapids. Tune in every day for in-depth conversations that matter to Michigan. Stateside is hosted by April Baer.

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Fred Upton's official 113th US Congress photo
US House Office of Photography/Wikimedia Commons

Though former president Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial has ended, difficult conversations and divided politics have not, particularly among conservative leaders. The Cass County Republican Party has again censured Michigan Congressman Fred Upton (R-06), this time for his vote to remove conspiracy theorist and Georgia Republican Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene from her committee assignments.

The University of Michigan football stadium
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, two-thirds of Washtenaw County's COVID-19 cases are affiliated with the University of Michigan. A campus health official discusses efforts to curb the spread of the virus. Also, a look at Michigan’s possible future as a haven for those escaping the worst effects of climate change.

Spectrum Health

Today on Stateside, the state and Michigan’s counties try to get on the same page, tracking who’s getting vaccinated by race. Also, naming the violence - and the fear - Asian Americans are living with during the pandemic. Plus, a snapshot of what college life is like during this pandemic year. 

A sign of the University of Michigan Central Campus
Anna Schlutt / Michigan Radio

During the past year, many universities have seen high rates of COVID-19 on or around their campuses. Academic institutions in Michigan and throughout the U.S. have faced challenging questions and criticism with regard to their decision-making in an unprecedented public health crisis. And often, university students and their behaviors — like attending social gatherings or even simply living in group housing — have played a role in spreading the virus at their schools.

Michigan Department of Natural Resources

Afrourbanism, Detroit's Black history and future

A bustling area of the country’s most chocolate city razed to make way for Highway I-375. An idyllic “Black Eden” designed as a safe haven of relaxation and entertainment in rural Yates Township. Remembering Idlewild and Detroit’s Black Bottom is an important part of contextualizing Michigan’s Black history, and they can provide the blueprint for creating  future spaces with black people in mind.

Portrait of US Rep Deb Haaland
U.S. House Office of Photography / Wikimedia Commons

The Senate confirmation proceedings for President Joe Biden’s pick to head the U.S. Department of the Interior began Tuesday. Democratic Congresswoman Debra Haaland (NM-01), if confirmed, will make history as the first Native American member of the Cabinet. It's also particularly important that she will likely be the leader of a department with a long record of mistreatment of Native people. Many tribal leaders are watching Haaland and the new Biden administration to see if they’ll implement changes in the federal government’s relationship with Native peoples.

a nurse holds a vial of one of the first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine.
Spectrum Health

Today on Stateside, Congresswoman Debra Haaland (D-NM) begins Senate confirmation hearings as President Joe Biden’s pick to head the U.S. Department of the Interior. A Michigan tribal chair discusses what Native leadership in the Cabinet could mean for tribes, going forward. Also, the new head of Michigan’s Department of Health and Human Services weighs in on the next pandemic battlegrounds. Plus, reimagining Idlewild, where generations of Black Michiganders went for vacation and respite.

John Pizniur / GBBC

Michigan has had quite an irruption this winter. We’re not talking lava, but rather an irruption of birds. It’s been a great year for winter birding because of this irruption and Michigan Audubon education coordinator Lindsay Cain explained that an irruption is when northern wintering birds come down south for winter because they’re not finding enough food. 

“They're moving to find food for the winter, which is a really great experience for a lot of birders because we're seeing a lot of things that we wouldn't normally see over the winter,” Cain said.

Ann Arbor's Skyline High School. Ann Arbor Public Schools has been on the state's "significant disproportionality" list for over-suspending black students for five years, but says it's taken aggressive steps to correct that disparity.
Wikimedia Commons

Today on Stateside, confusion and frustration among Ann Arbor parents over the decision on whether to reopen schools. Plus, a look into the history and future of public spaces centered around Detroit's Black residents. And, if you’re starting to feel a little cooped up, may we recommend some winter bird watching?

Macmillan Children's Publishing Group

Angeline Boulley’s debut young adult novel opens with a heart-pounding scene: a girl stands frozen in the woods, staring down the barrel of a gun.

Over the course of the book, Michigan author Boulley revisits this dramatic scene, each time adding just a little more context and gradually unraveling the novel’s mystery. The result is an elegantly-paced, emotionally complex thriller called Firekeeper’s Daughter. It’s making a splash with teen and adult audiences alike — and it hasn’t even hit the shelves yet.

Boys & Girls Club of Southeastern Michigan

Today, on Stateside, why getting schools on board to reopen has not been easy in some of the state’s larger districts. Plus, metro Detroit teens learn entrepreneurship and activism through social justice fashion design.

A water tower advertising the Detroit Zoo
Courtesy of the Detroit Zoological Society

Today, on Stateside, after four years with Trump at the head of the Republican party, where does the GOP go now?  Plus, a new Black-owned brewery in Grand Rapids navigates launching a business amid a pandemic.

[Get Stateside on your phone: subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Google Podcasts today.]

 


Courtesy of Valaurian Waller and Taste the Diaspora Detroit

A team of regional chefs and entrepreneurs is celebrating the cuisines of the African diaspora this month with a unique, boxed-lunch experience called Taste the Diaspora Detroit, which traces the foods' history and significant impact on American cooking and culture.

unemployement insurance form on a clipboard
Vitalii Vodolazskyi / Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, frustrated Michiganders try to navigate an unemployment system overwhelmed by pandemic job losses. Plus, a Detroit festival celebrates the food of the African diaspora.

Element5 Digital / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, the head of Detroit’s health department expresses tentative optimism about the current stage in the city’s battle against COVID-19. Plus, visions of Afrofuturism as seen in American comics. And, what homeschooling has to offer for Black families during—and after—the pandemic.

MSU Museums

Detroit writer and activist Adrienne Maree Brown pointed out that the experience of Black Americans, is by definition, a story of science fiction. Enslaved ancestors had to dream up a Black future that was unlike anything they experienced.

One of the most vital places for experimentation for science fiction and fantasy is in the comics. A new virtual exhibition at the Michigan State University Museum lays out a full panorama of Black Futures, as envisioned in panels. It’s called “Beyond the Black Panther: Visions of Afrofuturism in American Comics.”

man in a mask gets a vaccine from health care worker in a mask
Adobe Stock

Today, on Stateside, we talked with photographer Leni Sinclair about her years of political involvement and her stunning photos of Detroit’s stages and people. Also, how Detroit leveraged help from a large and well-funded partner to coordinate its massive effort to vaccinate residents. 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

When Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey (R-Clarklake) met with Hillsdale County Republican Party members at a restaurant on February 3, the discussion covered a number of topics, including Shirkey’s opposition to Governor Gretchen Whitmer. But his language wasn’t the sort that political leaders traditionally use in public.

Courtesy of Dominique Morisseau

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought live stage performances to a halt for almost a year now. And though the curtains are down, playwright, screenwriter, and storyteller Dominique Morisseau has been keeping busy. She spoke with Stateside about her new leadership role at the Detroit Public Theatre, the stories on her mind lately, and what’s next for the theatre industry — once audiences can finally return.

black and white archive photo of two nurses wearing masks.
National Archives

Today, on Stateside, a new state budget paves the way into another uncertain year. Also, a discussion about how undocumented immigrants have been shut out of federal aid during the pandemic.

Katie Harp / Unsplash

Democrats in Congress have become divided on whether someone’s immigration status determines receiving COVID-19 stimulus checks. Michigan Senators Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters are two of the eight Democrats in the Senate who supported an amendment to the budget during last week's marathon voting session which would prohibit undocumented immigrants from receiving stimulus checks.

Unsplash

Today on Stateside, the Senate’s impeachment trial of former president Donald Trump has begun. We talk with a Michigan lawyer whose scholarship has played a role in both sides of the debate. Also, an update on vaccinations for teachers, as an increasing number of Michigan schools aim to return to in-person learning. Plus, a reporter weighs in on a culinary rebrand of invasive carp.

US capitol building
Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

Yesterday, February 10, the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump began in the United States Senate. The trial is the first of its kind in that a president has never been impeached twice. Also, no president has ever been on trial after his term has ended. This second reason is the crux of Trump’s defense.

Twenty years ago, Michigan State University law professor Brian Kalt wrote a legal analysis on impeachment. In the 78 page defense brief issued by Trump’s lawyers, Kalt’s paper was cited 15 times.

Emma Winowiecki

Today on Stateside, a firsthand look at one Detroit family’s vaccine experience. Plus, a new short film takes on Detroit’s Motown past and the artists shaping its future. And, how Michigan’s GOP leaders are grappling the state’s growing militia movement.

charles mcgee
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, a Michigan state representative discusses easing the tragedy of Yemen’s civil war. Then, playwright and screenwriter Dominique Morisseau talks about deepening her connection with Detroit Public Theatre during a pandemic. And, safety tips on the Great Lakes. Just because ice is forming doesn’t mean it’s safe to walk on.

Linda Stephan


Unsplash

Today on Stateside, Grand Rapids public schools are back in the classroom. The district’s superintendent discusses the return to in-person learning. Also, writer Rochelle Riley tells us about her new book, which features children dressed up as iconic and influential Black Americans. Plus, a look at the history of Black sailors on the Great Lakes.

picture of an old ship
Public Domain


a person holds a vaccine vial
Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, the Michigan Republican Party meets this weekend to select a new chair. Two reporters discuss the candidates, as well as the latest power play that’s complicated the upcoming election. Also, why the small community of Hillsdale has a wealth of COVID-19 vaccines available for distribution. Plus, a curator discusses the Black Arts Library, which she’s brought to the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit.

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