Stateside | Michigan Radio
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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 & 10 p.m.

Stateside covers what you need (and want) to know about Michigan. You hear stories from people across the state—from policymakers in Lansing, to entrepreneurs in Detroit, to artists in Grand Rapids. Tune in every day for in-depth conversations about what matters in Michigan. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri).

Subscribe to Stateside on Apple Podcasts or Google Play.

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A newspaper being printed.
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, three cardiologists are suing the Detroit Medical Center, citing alleged fraud and concerns over quality of care. We get the latest from the Detroit News reporter who has been following this story. Plus, we talk to staff at two small-town Michigan newspapers about what communities have to lose when local news sources go out of business. 

Actors on stage during a performance of Flint, the play.
Michigan Photography

Stories of Flint's water crisis have been reported on in documentaries, magazines, newspapers, and on television and radio.  

But José Casas, assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Music, Theater, and Dance, has found a new way to tell the stories of Flint residents — using theater.

Paleontologist Nizar Ibrahim in front of a screen with spinosaurus skull
Courtesy of Nizar Ibrahim

Today on Stateside, Governor Whitmer last week ordered state agencies to stop working on a proposed tunnel intended to house replacement pipelines for Enbridge's Line 5. We hear about the legal opinion from Dana Nessel that prompted that order, and how Republican lawmakers are reacting to the news. Plus, a conversation with the paleontologist who worked to unearth Spinosaurus, the largest predatory dinosaur ever discovered. 

A diver inspects Enbridge's Line 5 pipeline under the Straits of Mackinac for a possible dent.
Enbridge inspection video shared with the state of Michigan

During his final days in office, former Governor Rick Snyder signed legislation that created the Mackinac Straits Corridor Authority. Its purpose? To oversee construction of a tunnel under the Straits of Mackinac that would encase new oil and gas pipelines to replace Enbridge's aging Line 5.

Even though Spring is here, the ice on is still 12 inches thick on some inland lakes. Because of this, you can see ice boats cruising along the ice on West Grand Traverse Bay or Lake Leelanau on a clear, windy day. 

President Ford reads a newspaper in the back of a car
David Hume Kennerly / Courtesy of the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum


two cars in a rear ending accident
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 


Today on Stateside, Governor Whitmer orders an audit of the Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association after it hikes the yearly fee on auto insurance policies by 15 percent. Plus, we explore two important pieces of our state's African-American history housed at the Library of Michigan.

picture of Dudley Randall working at a Typewriter
Bentley Historical Library

 


An original copy of a manual exploring African-American life in early 20th century Michigan. Poetry from African-American literati printed on one-page broadsides by a pioneering Detroit publishing house. These are two of the treasures of Michigan’s African-American history housed at the Library of Michigan. 

picture of Sabina West
Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, Congressman Dan Kildee (D-Flint) tells us about a newly-introduced House bill that aims to improve the Affordable Care Act, even as the Trump Administration is pushing to repeal the health care law. Plus, how the adoption system is failing children with darker skin, and how to fix it. 

A map made of toe tags representing undocumented migrants who died in the Sonoran Desert is part of the museum exhibit Hostile Terrian 94, created by University of Michigan anthropologist Jason De León.
Daniel Lopez / Undocumented Migration Project

Today on Stateside, we speak with two Oakland County public health officials about the measles outbreak there, and what residents can do to protect themselves and their children. Plus, a look at proposed reforms to Michigan's guardianship system for elderly and incapacitated adults. 

March Madness begins this week. The huge college basketball tournament starts with 68 teams and will eventually end with one national champion. But for some in northern Michigan, March Madness means more than basketball. For 10-year-old Ricky Bristol, who lives in East Jordan, it means practicing his violin.


LGBT Pride Flag
Tyrone Warner / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Today on Stateside, what will a lawsuit settlement that prohibits state-funded adoption agencies from refusing LGBTQ clients mean for Michigan moving forward? Plus, from full-length movies to one-minute shorts, we talk about the films you'll find at the 57th annual Ann Arbor Film Festival, which kicks off Tuesday.

person shaking prescription pills from bottle into hand
User: frankileon / Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, we look at why people in rural parts of Michigan have difficulty accessing what many doctors consider the most effective treatment for opioid addiction. We also talk about the roots of Islamophobia in the United States, and the financial strain PFAS contamination puts on municipalities.

cover of the book American Islamophobia: Understanding the Roots and Rise of Fear
University of California Press

The global Muslim community has been in mourning since a gunman open fired in two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, nearly a week ago. Fifty people were killed in the attack, which New Zealand’s prime minister has described as an act of terrorism.

The massacre has prompted a larger discussion about the rise of Islamophobia across the world, including here in the United States. Stateside spoke with Khaled Beydoun, a law professor at University of Detroit Mercy and author of American Islamophobia: Understanding the Roots and Rise of Fear, about the increase in anti-Muslim sentiment.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

In a nondescript building in Marshall, Derek Smith is reaming a hole to fit a tuning key into head of a mandolin. That sound is a squeaky and a little irritating. 

It wasn't long before I asked Smith if he could create a different sound. I asked him to play something on one of the mandolins in the shop, a much better sound.

Smith and the rest of the team at Northfield Mandolins make high-end instruments. And the demand for the mandolins is brisk.

Inside of a public bus.
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, a conversation about what it would take to get Michigan to rethink its approach to public transit. Plus, why the traditional A-F grading system might not make sense for the modern classroom. 

picture of wallpaper
michigan history center

 

In the 19th century, wallpaper became an increasingly popular home decor trend among Americans. Influenced by the culture of Victorian England, these wallpapers were adorned with loud patterns, flowers, animals, and a lot of colors.

But those bright, vibrant hues held a dark secret.  

“In the mid-19th century, green became a very popular color. And the way to get the various hues of green was to mix it with arsenic,” explained the Michigan History Center's Rachel Clark. 

women posing at a Holi event
Razi Jafri / Michigan Radio

It's finally here! Wednesday's vernal equinox marks the first day of spring. Celebrations marking the transition from the dark days of winter into a gentler season are part of cultural traditions across the world. 

Mary Stewart Adams, a star lore historian and the founder of Michigan's only international dark sky park, joined Stateside to tell us more about why the equinox has received so much attention throughout time.

a sample of poison wallpaper - it's light green with blue stripes and floral decoration
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, despite an upward economic trend in Michigan, nearly half of households in the state are struggling to afford basic necessities. Plus, it’s (finally) spring! We hear about the cultural significance of this transition for different cultural groups across the state.

Ben LaCross of Leelenau Fruit Company prunes young cherry trees.
MAX JOHNSTON / INTERLOCHEN PUBLIC RADIO

For the past decade, Americans have been buying tart cherries from Turkey for cheap. Tart cherry farmers in Michigan say that’s hurting their bottom line. Now they’re hoping a new bill in Washington will balance the scales.


picture of someone voting
UNSPLASH

 


beagle
Humane Society

Corteva Agriscience, a division of DowDupont, says it's ended its controversial testing program that was exposed last week by animal welfare advocates.

Islamic Center of America
Wikimedia Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0


Emilio Gutierrez Soto
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we talk with Congresswoman Debbie Dingell about efforts to halt the deportation of Mexican journalist and University of Michigan Knight-Wallace Fellow Emilio Gutierrez Soto. Plus, we check in with Wayne County Executive Warren Evans about the state of the county's finances.

Listen above for the full show, or find individual segments below.

Political roundup: Unlimited medical benefits, lack of transparency contribute to high auto insurance rates

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

On the counter there was a big stone mortar and pestle, and a capped bottle with a vivid green liquid in it labeled “ARUGULA.” It was clear, this was going to be a different kind of drink.

Microscope
Pixabay.com

 

Today on Stateside, the Humane Society of the U.S. talks about the 36 beagles being used to test toxic chemicals in a West Michigan laboratory, and its efforts to have the dogs released and put up for adoption. Plus, a coming-of-age story that draws inspiration from the music of 1970s Detroit.

beagle
Humane Society

The Humane Society of the United States is pushing for the release of three dozen beagles it says are being force-fed fungicides in a West Michigan laboratory.


snowy owl in flight
Chris Neri

Today on Stateside, we talk about Michigan's third-grade reading law, which starting next year will require schools to hold back third graders who aren't reading at grade level. Plus, we talk about the Broadway hit "Hamilton" as it makes its Detroit debut tonight.

Pile of children's books
Unsplash

Read at grade level or you could get held back. Those are the options for Michigan third graders starting next year.

That's thanks to a 2016 law aimed at boosting the state's educational performance. It makes Michigan one of 16 states with similar laws that hold students back if they aren't reading by the third grade. 

a pair of hands holding a newspaper that says "business" at the top.
Adeolu Eletu / Unsplash

We often hear politicians use buzzwords: things like “media elite,” “fake news,” and “welfare state.”

Some of those seem straightforward enough. Others, not so much.

One Michigan Radio listener, Ellen Rusten, had a question about a phrase you’ve probably heard come out of a politician's mouth: "business-friendly." Rusten wanted to know, just what does that popular buzzword actually mean?

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