Stateside | Michigan Radio
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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 & 10 p.m.

Stateside covers what you need (and want) to know about Michigan. You hear stories from people across the state—from policymakers in Lansing, to entrepreneurs in Detroit, to artists in Grand Rapids. Tune in every day for in-depth conversations about what matters in Michigan. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri).

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The Mitchell's satyr butterfly
Mark Carlson

The race is on to save one of the world’s rarest butterflies.

striped safety cones on a road
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, how the state is carrying out infrastructure projects it can't afford to maintain. Plus, an Interlochen Public Radio investigation into the Grand Traverse County Correctional Facility after multiple former female inmates claimed that some officers were ignoring their requests for basic personal hygiene products. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Looking down on a hand holding an open bottle of prescription drugs.
Sharyn Morrow / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

 

Today on Stateside, a look at how the no-fault auto insurance changes could affect health care. Plus, out-of-pocket drug costs are still rising, and it’s not clear where a solution could come from.

 

Long-term care provider: No-fault changes would ensure your car’s repaired but not necessarily your body

 

 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The Cheers! team received a request from a listener. Bruce Schermerhorn asked whether Tammy Coxen with Tammy’s Tastings could come up with a cocktail using something from Faygo that would be nice for sipping while on his pontoon boat this summer.

Kevin Cronin

Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer says that Benton Harbor Area Schools have until June 14 to submit a plan to keep their high school open. If not, the state could choose to dissolve the entire district. Plus, Northern Michigan University is working to provide affordable Internet access to students in need. 

More and more school work is being done online, but some students across the country are falling behind their peers because they don’t have internet at home.

Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan bean farmers send a lot of exports to Mexico. So, what happens to those farmers if President Trump follows through on his threats to add tariffs to Mexican goods? Plus, we hear about a tricked out bicycle with accordion and percussion instruments that blends classical music and public art. 

Ludmilla Joaquina Valentina Buyo / Public Domain

One of the perks of living on the east side of Michigan is that you can occasionally tune into radio stations across the border in Windsor. A recent piece from the CBC tells the story of how Elton John’s hit song “Bennie and the Jets” may owe part of its popularity to one of those stations and its Detroit audience. 

two cars in a rear ending accident
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The new auto insurance law signed by Governor Gretchen Whitmer is leaving many questions about what will happen to the cost of insurance.

Lawmakers in the state House and Senate approved an amendment to the law on Tuesday to fix what they say would’ve caused a temporary spike in insurance costs.

 

Eric Lupher is the president of the Citizens Research Council of Michigan. He says the Legislature moved so quickly on the changes to the law that insurance companies are still trying to understand the ramifications.

 

Brent Hofacker / Adobe Stock

U.S. and Mexican officials are still trying to find a solution to avoid President Donald Trump’s threatened tariffs. Trump says a 5% tariff on all goods from Mexico is in retaliation for migrants crossing the border into the U.S.

Joe Cramer is the executive director of the Michigan Bean Commission. He says after the U.S., Mexico is the bean industry’s biggest trading partner.

Blue Bird Inn sign and building
Nephilim Art Studios / Courtesy of Detroit Sound Conservancy

Some of jazz's most iconic musicians have graced the stage at the Blue Bird Inn on Detroit’s West Side. But the once popular bar at 5021 Tireman has stood empty for more than a decade. Now, there’s an effort to restore the historic venue for a new era.

Unsplash

Today on Stateside, lawmakers are again proposing an expansion of the state's Elliot-Larsen Civil Rights Act to include protections for Michigan’s LGBTQ citizens. Plus, how the wet, cold spring has impacted Michigan farmers this growing season. 

clothing rack
Unsplash

Detroit may be the city that put the world on wheels, but a new effort launching in the Midtown district might add apparel to Detroit's manufacturing resume. It's called the Industrial Sewing and Innovation Center (ISAIC), and it’s opening on Cass Avenue.

row of colorful car hoods
User Zelda Richardson / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today on Stateside, how will the auto industry be impacted if President Trump follows through on his threat to impose tariffs on Mexican goods? Plus, a theater in Kalamazoo brings its productions to life for people with blindness or visual impairment.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

cbd oil
Tinnakorn / Adobe Stock

 

The Food and Drug Adminstration wants to collect more information about CBD, a non-toxicating extract of the cannabis plant. This comes as CBD-infused products such as candy, oils, drinks, and even dog food are already flooding the market. 

CBD is becoming popular for treating things such as chronic pain and other ailments -- despite confusion around its legal status.

cannabis leaves and three CBD oil
yavdat / Adobe Stock

 

Today on Stateside, the potential of the cannabis compound CBD as a treatment for people with chronic pain. Plus, a new study says the tax incentives states use to lure businesses might not be paying off. 

Courtesy: Rick Hale, Clockwork

Clockwright's Rick Hale is making clocks unlike any you’ve seen before. It’s a piece of sculpture in motion made of Michigan hardwoods.

a gas pump
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

Today on Stateside, we talk to Governor Gretchen Whitmer about how the challenges her plan to "fix the damn roads" faces in the Legislature. Plus, we learn about Aldo Leopold, a father of wildlife ecology, and his connection to Les Cheneaux Islands in Lake Huron.

 

This week marks the fifth annual Leopold Festival, an event that takes place on the Les Cheneaux Islands in honor of Aldo Leopold, one of the founders of wildlife ecology and a dedicated conservationist.

 

JACQUES LEBLANC JR. holds a fish in a net
JACQUES LEBLANC JR.

Native Americans in Michigan have legal rights to fish and hunt established by centuries-old treaties between tribes and the federal government.

These rights mean that tribal members aren't governed by the same state regulations as other anglers and hunters. And that's led to confrontations and harassment of Native American anglers throughout the state's history. 

Michigan governor's office

Governor Gretchen Whitmer is currently attending the Mackinac Policy Conference, an annual meeting of business people, politicians, and activists where one of the topics of discussion is how exactly to address Michigan’s crumbling infrastructure. 

Stateside caught up with the governor to talk about how the push to “fix the damn roads" is going.

Car accident
Kadmy / Adobe Stock

 

A recent study by the University of Michigan found auto insurance rates are unaffordable for residents in 97% of Michigan counties.

 

The high rates are especially tough on low-income residents in Detroit, where auto insurance rates average $5,414 a year. So, would recent changes to the state's auto insurance law, passed by state lawmakers last week, help those drivers most in need of relief? 

Rush our traffic on US-23
YouTube Screen grab / MDOT

State officials say they need to spend $2.5 billion dollars more each year to fix Michigan’s roads and bridges. Governor Gretchen Whitmer wants to raise the money by increasing the fuel tax by 45 cents a gallon.

Asian Carp
Kate Gardiner / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Today on Stateside, after years of scandal and leadership turmoil, the Michigan State University Board of Trustees have named Samuel Stanley Jr. as MSU's new president. Plus, why the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are recommending a $778 million plan to keep invasive Asian carp out of the Great Lakes.

young kids playing with toys on floor
Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

High-quality early childhood education can have benefits that extend generations. That’s according to some of the latest research on the Perry Preschool Project. The study took place in Ypsilanti in the 1960s, and offered a high-quality preschool program to a group of "high-risk" three- and four-year-olds. 

Researchers have been following this group through the decades to see what long-term impacts that intervention had on participants. Now, decades later, researchers have found significant impacts on the health and well-being of not just the participants, but their children as well.

Annie Spratt / Unsplash

 

Today on Stateside, Attorney General Dana Nessel clashes with the Republican-led legislature on a law that would change the rules on petition drives. Plus, an invasive insect could make its way to Michigan and wreak havoc on crops.

 

 

Beach
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

 

Today on Stateside, an update on the partnership agreements school districts signed with the state to avoid school closures in 2017. Plus, we talk to our Friday political commentators about the recent indictment of state Representative Larry Inman (R-Traverse City), and the effect of “dark money” on the public's trust in government.

 

a map of michigan with stars where there are school districts that have partnership agreements with the state
Michigan Department of Education

In early 2017, more than three dozen schools across Michigan faced an uncertain future. After ranking in the bottom 5% of state test scores for three consecutive years, they risked being shut down by the state’s School Reform Office.

Blue Lake Pass by Maya Lin undulating sculptures of tan particleboard
G.R. Christmas / Courtesy of Pace Gallery

The artist and architect Maya Lin is best known for her work designing the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington D.C. Lin designed that monument in 1981 when she was still a college senior. Since then, she’s gone on to design numerous buildings, sculptures, and landscape installations around the world.

Lester Graham

It’s sad when the bottle is nearly empty. That’s what Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings found when she visited a friend’s house for a party and the bottle of Ann Arbor Distilling Company's new Absinthe Violette was almost gone.

“What have you done to go through that much absinthe?” she asked. The reply was they had been making Necromancers. 

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