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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 & 10 p.m.

Stateside covers what you need (and want) to know about Michigan. You hear stories from people across the state—from policymakers in Lansing, to entrepreneurs in Detroit, to artists in Grand Rapids. Tune in every day for in-depth conversations about what matters in Michigan. Stateside is hosted by April Baer.

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Realtors and interest groups opposed to regulation are shaping septic system policies in Michigan's state and local politics.

Realtors don't like the idea of inspections tied to home sales. Anti-regulation lawmakers don't like the alternatives.

a barn sits behind a row of crops
Bob Jagendorf / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Today on Stateside, as the remaining presidential contenders make for Michigan, can Bernie Sanders repeat his success of 2016 in Tuesday’s primary? Or will Joe Biden close the sale with voters he's connected with in the past? Plus, a renewal millage to fund the Detroit Institute of Arts is on the ballot in three counties. Some Detroit residents think the museum has taken attention away from more pressing challenges in the city.

Gary Jones stands at a UAW podium
United Auto Workers

Today on Stateside, former United Auto Workers president Gary Jones has been charged with embezzlement. What does this mean for the future of the union and its members? Plus, Senator Elizabeth Warren has dropped out of the presidential race days before the Michigan primary. Many supporters say they are dismayed, but not surprised, that Warren never caught on with more voters.

Elizabeth Warren stands next to union workers on strike
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Senator Elizabeth Warren’s exit from the race to become the Democratic presidential nominee has left many of her supporters dismayed, but not surprised. With her steady decline in the polls—including a third-place finish in her home state of Massachusetts on Super Tuesday—few were expecting a comeback. On Thursday morning, Warren announced that she would not be continuing with her campaign.

doctor holding red stethoscope
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, a federal judge has invalidated Michigan's Medicaid work requirements. Republican leaders in the state Legislature are already pushing back. What does this mean for the more than 200,000 people in the state subject to those requirements? Plus, we'll talk about how the Democratic candidates for president stack up when it comes to addressing the concerns of black voters.

four of the drag queens from MI Drag brunch
Michigan Drag Brunch

On Sunday mornings, the West Michigan brunch scene gets served a meal full of realness, thanks to the drag queens of Michigan Drag Brunch. The project is the brainchild of producer and CEO Trevor Straub and performer Gabriella Galore. They said the project started as a way to bring the drag scene to an earlier morning crowd in Grand Rapids.

A collection of "I Voted" stickers
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, as Super Tuesday results roll in, Michigan voters wait on the sidelines and watch their candidate choices dwindle. Plus, we take a look at Mike Bloomberg’s massive campaign spending efforts in Michigan.

Ali Harb, Middle East Eye

As the Democratic presidential contest intensifies and Super Tuesday looms, campaigns are seeking the support of particular communities or demographics. In Michigan, and the nation as a whole, many Arab Americans are aligning themselves with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders.

Bernie Sanders speaking in Traverse City, Michigan.
Todd Church / Flickr

 

In 2016 voters in the state of Michigan shocked pollsters when they elected Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders as the winner of the Democratic presidential primary. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was favored to win Michigan according to most polls ahead of the primary. Now, the question is: will Sanders’ momentum following his recent successes be enough to secure another Michigan primary win amid a more crowded primary field?

Marion Hayden
Jodi Westrick

Today on Stateside, can Bernie Sanders pull off another surprise upset in Michigan's primary next month? Also, the state settles a case over juvenile offenders victimized by sexual assault. And, a lens on Detroit's jazz history and living legacy. 

people protesting the detainment of iraqi nationals in Detroit
Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we talk to a leader in Michigan's Chaldean community about his meeting with Vice President Mike Pence about the future for detained and deported Iraqi Christians. Plus, a conversation about why so many mentally ill people in Michigan end up in jail, and what we can do about it. 

a picture of a record that says Groovesville
Courtesy of Dan Austin

  

When you think of Detroit music in the 1960s, chances are the first thing that comes to mind is Motown Records. The iconic label produced some of that era's biggest hits.  But Detroit was full of plenty of other artists outside of the Motown label who were also deeply shaping the city's sound.  

outside of the Detroit Institute of Art
Author Sailko / Wikimedia Commons http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

On today's Stateside, lawmakers in Lansing may be ready to throw clerks a lifeline as they prepare to count an onslaught of absentee ballots this primary season. Plus, we'll talk to the state’s top health official about how Michigan is preparing for a potential outbreak of the coronavirus.

Justin Amash and Fred Upton
U.S. House of Representatives

Today on Stateside, we look at two traditionally Republican congressional districts in West Michigan that are going through political change. Plus, we talk to poet and prose writer Saladin Ahmed, who has made a stellar transition into comic books and written for several iconic Marvel characters. 

guns in holsters on two people
Lucio Eastman - Free State Project - PorcFest 2009 / Wikimedia Commons http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

On Monday, Livingston County became the 28th county in the state to pass a resolution supporting gun rights. These resolutions are not legally binding. Language varies from place to place, but the basic idea is to affirm that counties should uphold constitutional gun rights, no matter what laws state and federal governments may pass.

Linda Brundage, the executive director of the Michigan Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence, told Stateside that she thinks much of the outrage about gun control legislation stems from a misunderstanding about what those laws would do. 

a cover of Ms. Marvel
Penciler: Minkyu Jung, Cover Artist: Eduard Petrovich / Marvel Comics

If writer Saladin Ahmed never typed another word, he'd already have introduced us to so many interesting people. From fantasy novels, to Westerns, to supernatural sleuth stories, Ahmed’s writing spans both genre and form.

Right now, he's the author of two major titles for Marvel Comics: The Magnificent Ms. Marvel, and Miles Morales: Spider-Man. Ahmed took over the character of Miles Morales from creator Brian Bendis, and is putting his own stamp on the story. 

windmill in field
cwwycoff1 / Flickr Creative Commons HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

Today on Stateside, we talk with Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-12th) about the presidential race. It's been four years since she predicted Donald Trump's surprise win in Michigan. We'll ask what she sees ahead in 2020. Plus, Michigan’s two largest energy companies have deeply divergent plans for moving to renewables. What does that mean for our state's energy future? 

An overhead shot of the Oscoda-Wurtsmith airport
United States Geological Survey

Cape Canaveral might have a bit of competition up here in the north. The Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport near Lake Huron is being considered as a spot for a horizontal rocket launch site. Stateside spoke to Justin Kasper, a professor with the Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering at the University of Michigan, about how the site might be used and Michigan’s past and future place in the space industry. 

Debbie Dingell wearing a pink blazer and standing against a brick wall
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

After a decisive victory at the Nevada caucuses over the weekend, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) has emerged as the frontrunner in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. That’s after tying for the most votes in the Iowa caucus and winning the New Hampshire primary.

These kinds of early wins are often key to generating the momentum a candidate needs to clinch the nomination. Democratic Congresswoman Debbie Dingell thinks that’s a problem.

Photo of a cell phone with online comment section.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, Michigan is under the microscope this election year. We talk to a POLITICO reporter about why the state could play a key role in the rift among labor unions over Medicare for All. Plus, we talk to the hosts of Michigan Radio’s new political podcast. It focuses on a competitive congressional district where Republicans are hoping to hold onto the gains of 2016.

doctor holding red stethoscope
Unsplash

Medicare for All took second place to the dust-ups Wednesday at the Democratic debate, but it's still a prominent issue for a lot of voters. Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren discuss it frequently on the campaign trail. But concerns are developing within some labor unions over the plan for a single-payer health care system. As primary momentum shifts toward Michigan, eyes are now on union leaders in the state.

An absentee ballot in an envelope.
Nadya Peek / Flickr

Today on Stateside, a bill to give local clerks a head start on absentee ballot counting has hit a wall in the Legislature. We'll hear from one clerk who's going back to the drawing board. Plus, a conversation with the owner of an Ann Arbor record store owner about the albums he's listening to and loving right now. 

arms in striped shirt going through a record crate
Annie Theby / Unsplash

In 2020, we want to remind you—and ourselves—of the importance of taking a break. And what better way to do that than to take an old (or new) record off the shelf and spin a few tunes? We’re inviting folks from some Michigan record stores we love to talk about what they're listening to right now.

Former Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick
Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, as President Trump pardons a slew of white-collar criminals, some Detroiters are asking for consideration for Kwame Kilpatrick. The former Detroit mayor is serving a lengthy sentence on corruption charges. What would a commutation do for Trump's standing in metro Detroit? Also, a new documentary tells the story of how a lakeside town in West Michigan became contaminated with PFAS.

Independence Square, Accra, Ghana.
Author: Rjruiziii / Wikimedia Commons http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The government of Ghana spent 2019 inviting African Americans to visit the country. The national tourism campaign was called the “Year of Return.” Last year marked the 400th anniversary of the arrival of enslaved Africans in North America, and the campaign focused on bringing members of the African diaspora back to the land from which their ancestors were taken.

Stateside spoke with two Detroiters about their own experiences in Ghana during the Year of Return.

the Renaissance Center at night
Author BriYYZ / Wikimedia Commons bit.ly/2uVI57b

Today on Stateside, General Motors backs further into its comfort zone as it exits some markets around the Pacific Rim. We'll talk about how the company's effort to focus on strengths is playing out. Plus, we talk to comedian Joe Pera about his series that follows a mild-mannered oddball living in Marquette. 

Joe Pera in a still from his show
Courtesy of Joe Pera

Comedian Joe Pera is not from Marquette. But the version of himself he plays in the television series Joe Pera Talks With You is recognizable to anyone familiar with the Upper Peninsula.

The show has become a runaway hit on Cartoon Network's Adult Swim nighttime block. Pera's oddball observations on subjects like beans and grocery stores are weirdly hilarious. But what really makes the series is that Pera is not just being funny. 

Jed Jaworski

Large waves and Lake Michigan’s record high water level are breaking down the barrier that protects the historic Point Betsie Lighthouse in Frankfort.

Key parts of the structure are fractured and falling apart. Supporters of the lighthouse are trying to get repairs done. 

But Interlochen Public Radio's Taylor Wizner reports that a lengthy process may stand in the way.

a headshot of Dan Gilbert
Quicken Loans

Today on Stateside, a super PAC funded by the DeVos family has raised $800,000 to unseat Democratic U.S. Senator Gary Peters. We talk about how spending by outside groups could impact the state's most competitive 2020 races. Plus, an update on the Michigan family caught in a coronavirus scare on a cruise ship.

George N'Namdi, Davida Artis, and Anthony Artis smile in front of a brick wall
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

For a long time, the work of African American artists didn't get much recognition in the world of fine art. That hasn't stopped art lovers from building impressive collections of pieces by black artists. We talked to two collectors about their approach to buying, and how the business of African American art has changed over the years.

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