Stateside | Michigan Radio
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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 & 10 p.m.

Stateside covers what you need (and want) to know about Michigan. You hear stories from people across the state—from policymakers in Lansing, to entrepreneurs in Detroit, to artists in Grand Rapids. Tune in every day for in-depth conversations about what matters in Michigan. Stateside is hosted by April Baer.

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Dave Crabill using a tool to remove the flower from a hemp stalk
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

In 2018, the U.S. Congress lifted a pre-World War II restriction that made it illegal for farmers to grow industrial hemp—a variety of the cannabis sativa plant that contains less than .3% THC.

More than 500 Michigan farmers are licensed to grow the crop. This year, they farmed around 30,000 acres of hemp.

Jeff Smith / Flickr

 


Today on Stateside, the U.S. Supreme Court has struck down a lower court's ruling that ordered Michigan to redraw its congressional and state legislative district lines before the 2020 election. Plus, we talk to the reporter who helped solve the mysterious disappearance of a young Michigan man and FBI informant.

the american flag and the FBI flag hanging side by side
Federal Bureau of Investigation / Flickr

In 2015, Billy Reilly disappeared while on a trip to Russia and Ukraine. In the five years leading up to his disappearance, the 28-year-old from Oxford, Michigan had been working part-time as an FBI informant. 

Reilly’s family spent years pleading with the U.S. government to help them find their son, but they received little assistance.

It was Wall Street Journal reporter Brett Forrest whose research into Reilly's disappearance eventually led to the discovery that the young man had been murdered while abroad. 

a small orange brown butterfly sits on top of a yellow flower
Vince Cavalieri / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

 


Today on Stateside, more people will be eligible for welfare benefits like food stamps and cash assistance under new rules rolled out by Governor Gretchen Whitmer this week. Plus, the budget for the Pure Michigan tourism campaign was zeroed out in a line-item veto. We'll talk about the campaign's effectiveness, as well as the politics over its funding. 

Close up of a snowflake
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, what we know about the details of the UAW's tentative agreement with General Motors. Plus, why a state lawmaker wants to override the NCAA rules that restrict how student athletes are allowed to earn money. 

Adobe Stock

It’s that time of year: the days are getting shorter, the temperature is dropping, and Michiganders are beginning to (reluctantly) accept that winter is near.

The last two winters have been overall warmer on average, but with multiple periods of “polar vortex,” or extremely frigid temperatures.

Two people pick vegetables from a set of tall plants
Adam Rayes / Michigan Radio

With all the news about climate change, pollution, and habitat destruction, it’s easy to be pessimistic about the environmental challenges facing the world. Our Climate Crew series features people who are stepping up in their own communities to do something about it.

person in orange football jersey and black helmet holds a football
Riley McCullough / Unsplash

California made sports history last month when Governor Gavin Newsom signed a bill that would let college athletes cash in on the $14 billion college sports industry.

The landmark "Fair Pay to Play Act" opens the door for athletes to be paid for their likeness, name, image, and lets them sign endorsement deals.

farmer holding soybean plant
United Soybean Board / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 


Today on Stateside, after 31 days on the picket line, the UAW and General Motors came to a tentative contract agreement. We hear about the details and what comes next. Plus, Michigan farmers face record low production of corn and soybeans  after a cold, wet spring. 

James Poniewozik portrait
Courtesy of Penguin Random House

 

How did Donald Trump vault from the faux-boardroom of The Apprentice into the Oval Office?

A new book called Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television, and the Fracturing of America offers some answers. 

Angelo Binno and Jason Turkish pose
Isabella Isaacs-Thomas / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we talk with the Genesee County Sheriff about his department's latest sting operation to combat sex crimes involving children. Plus, how a Michigan man’s legal win will make the LSAT more accessible to those with visual impairments.

mackinac island arch rock
VIPLAV VALLURI / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS / HTTP://BIT.LY/1XMSZCG

Today on Stateside, we talk to a business leader who wants legal protections for LGBTQ people, and a gay politician who says they are not needed. Plus, an updated system for driverless cars is being tested on the streets of Detroit. Are people ready for them?

person holding tongs to pick up marijuana on scale
Get Budding / Unsplash

It's been almost a year since Michigan voters legalized recreational marijuana. Soon, the state will begin accepting applications for recreational pot businesses. That begs the question: what does all this mean for the existing medical marijuana industry in Michigan? 

worker on an assembly line leans into a car door
Adobe Stock

 


Today on Stateside, how signs of progress on a U.S. trade deal with China could impact Michigan manufacturers. Plus, one family is hoping to fill the gaps in mental health care services for young adults after losing their son to suicide.

A photo of Garrett Halpert in Washington D.C.
Photo courtesy of Julie Halpert

When it comes to supporting and treating young people who struggle with mental illness, the safety net in Michigan has a lot of holes. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among people ages 15 to 34, but finding appropriate medical care is often a difficult process. It can take months to get an appointment with a psychiatrist or therapist, even when a young person is in crisis. 

A boat in Lake Huron near a sinkhole in Alpena, Michigan
David J. Ruck / Great Lakes Outreach Media

 

Today on Stateside, temperatures are supposed to drop across the state next week. What does that mean for the recent outbreak of Eastern equine encephalitis? Plus, a fitting cocktail for the summer-like days and chilly fall nights of early autumn. 

Kevin Randall stands in front of a river
Courtesy of Kevin Randall

With all the news about climate change, pollution and habitat destruction, it’s easy to be pessimistic about the environmental challenges facing the world. Our Climate Crew series features people who are stepping up in their own communities to do something about it. 

A fellow teacher tipped us off about Kevin Randall, who teaches biology at Grandville High School. We talked to him about what he’s been doing to make his school a little greener.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

When you think of a daiquiri, you might think of summer. Tammy Coxen with Tammy’s Tastings thinks the daiquiri has a place in fall too.

“We're in that transitional season. We're still getting hot days but cool nights and so I went with an Autumn Daiquiri today,” she said.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Every homeowner at least occasionally needs some tools. But they can be expensive and inaccessible for some people, especially in low-income communities.

Whiskey Point, at the west end of the harbor at Beaver Island.
Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we hear the latest from Lansing after Governor Whitmer met with top Republican leaders in the state Legislature. Plus, what Michigan can learn from Norway’s prison and mental health systems. 

a waiter holds a plate of food
Louis Hansel / Unsplash

 


Today on Stateside, between anemic state funding and fewer people in the classroom, many of Michigan’s public universities are facing challenging times. Plus, a new initiative at the University of Michigan looks to provide evidence-based training on how to prevent school violence.

red lockers in a close up shot
Pixabay

 


In the wake of multiple mass school shootings in recent years, the question of how to reduce violence and make schools safer has become a pressing one. Answering that question will be the goal of a brand new national research and training center at the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

An open book that says "Veto" in red stamped with red ink pad next to it
Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, an update on the latest from Lansing as state House and Senate Republicans try to undo some of Governor Whitmer's 147 line-item vetoes. Plus, a former UAW official calls on the union to clean house.

doctor holding stethoscope with arms crossed
Unsplash

Before insurance companies, and co-pays, and filing claims, the relationship between doctors and patients was simple. Those who needed medical care would visit their doctor’s office or request a house call. Once that care was provided, the doctor was paid directly.

Some physicians are bringing that model into the 21st century by offering direct primary care to their patients on a subscription basis. 

A U.S. Census Bureau form sent to a Michigan address last year
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, as the UAW strike against General Motors begins its fourth week, we hear from one striker on the picket line. Plus, how Governor Whitmer’s line item vetoes will impact charter schools and autism services in Michigan. 

cbd oil
Tinnakorn / Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, the potential of the cannabis compound CBD as a treatment for people with chronic pain. Plus, a study out of North Carolina State University breaks down why the tax incentives states use to lure businesses might not be paying off.

a piggy bank, a stack of one dollar bills, and a stethoscope sit on a woodgrain table
FLICKR USER 401(K) / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, top United Auto Workers union leaders are now working with federal investigators on the probe into corruption at the UAW. Plus, we talk to the Detroiter who is just one country away from having visited every United Nations recognized country. She is aiming to be the first black woman to do so. 

Jodi Westrick

Michigan Radio's Bryce Huffman, creator and host of a new podcast Same Same Different, joined Stateside to talk about the launch of the podcast and what listeners can expect to gain from it.

Throughout the five episodes, Huffman and guests will explore issues around identity and how to survive “otherness,” which he describes as “that feeling that you’re different, and sometimes even less than, the people around you.” 

Debbie Dingell and Fred Upton
Wikicommons

 

Name-calling. Punching back. Finger-pointing. It's what we've come to expect out of Washington.

U.S. Representatives Fred Upton (R-6th District) and Debbie Dingell (D-12th District) are calling for a return to civility and collegiality at the nation's Capitol, and in America more broadly. 

They co-authored an op-ed in the Detroit News earlier this year, writing "A vibrant democratic republic depends on vigorous debate — but also recognizes the importance of compromise." 

Stateside spoke with Dingell and Upton Wednesday morning ahead of an appearance at the Detroit Economic Club.

An open book that says "Veto" in red stamped with red ink pad next to it
Adobe Stock

 


Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer explains the reasoning behind her 147 line-item vetoes in the state budget she signed Monday night. Plus, Congresswoman Debbie Dingell and Congressman Fred Upton talk about civility in an era of partisanship and division. 

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