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In July 1967, five days of chaos erupted in Detroit. Citizens, police, and troops clashed in a violent conflict that left 43 people dead, thousands of buildings destroyed, and a lingering scar on the once-vibrant city. It was a pivotal moment for Detroit, and for the country.Today, many believe Detroit is having a renaissance. And there have been plenty of visible improvements in recent years.But for many Detroiters, little has changed for the better in the past half-century. Poverty is even more entrenched. There are few good jobs and even fewer good schools. Blight and foreclosure have erased entire neighborhoods.If we want to understand today’s Detroit, we have to consider the city’s turbulent past. That’s why Michigan Radio is revisiting the events of that hot summer in 1967.From July 17-28, Stateside and Morning Edition will hear from people who were there; explore the issues that led to the deadliest riot of the 1960s; and examine why it still resonates in the city today.

You can follow the events of 1967 as they happened in real time

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The events of 1967 Detroit uprising unfolded rapidly.  It was sparked by a glass bottle being thrown at a police officer early Sunday morning on July 23, 1967. By the end of that day, the Detroit Police, Michigan State Police, and National Guard had all been called in to try to control the situation. 

Fifty years later, starting late Saturday evening, Michigan Radio and Stateside will be tweeting the events of the 1967 Detroit uprising as they happened.

Follow along as @StatesideRadio retells the story of a city that had reached a breaking point.

We'll be tweeting as though Michigan Radio were on the scene, documenting in real time the confusion and chaos that spread through the city.

This project is drawing from a variety of academic and historic sources, including the Walter P. Reuther Library at Wayne State University and the Detroit Public Library. Reference books, including Sidney Fine's Violence in the Model City: The Cavanagh Administration, Race Relations, and the Detroit Riot of 1967 , and Joel Stone's Detroit 1967: Origin, Impact, Legacies, provided many details about the uprising. 

We will also be referencing and sharing news articles, radio reports, and television broadcasts from various media organizations created during and after the uprising of 1967.

Tweets by StatesideRadio

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