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11th Congressional District

Rep. Haley Stevens smiling in front of an American flag
U.S. House of Representatives

Today on Stateside, recently re-elected Democratic Representative Haley Stevens (MI-11) explains what’s next in the process of getting COVID-19 vaccines to Michiganders and talks about the presidential transition process. Plus, a conversation about the lasting influence of jazz legend Yusef Lateef. 

Democratic U.S. Congresswoman Haley Stevens has been elected for a second term representing Michigan's 11th Congressional District.

Stevens defeated her Republican opponent, Birmingham lawyer Eric Esshaki, 50% to 48%, with all votes counted.

Claudio Schwarz | @purzlbaum / Unsplash

Stateside for Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Today on Stateside, democrat Haley Stevens tries to hold on to a swing seat in one of the tightest congressional races in Michigan. Then, a conversation around “unschooling” as an alternative to the hectic school year. Plus, how the FBI turns insider tips into a viable case.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A federal judge is promising to issue a ruling on a lawsuit challenging Michigan’s signature petition deadline for the August primary.

The deadline for candidates to submit petition signatures is April 21st.

But the governor’s Stay Home order due to the COVID-19 pandemic shut down normal petition circulation on March 23rd.

portrait of Eric Esshaki
vote.ericesshaki.com

A Birmingham lawyer has announced his campaign to unseat Democratic incumbent Haley Stevens. Eric Esshaki is a Republican running for Michigan's 11th Congressional district. He says Congress is broken.

Whittney Williams

A Canton, Michigan Republican has announced her campaign for Congress.

Whittney Williams is a first-generation immigrant from Taiwan.

She would run against incumbent Haley Stevens, a Democrat, if she wins the Republican nomination for Michigan's 11th Congressional district.

Graphic of the outline of the state of Michigan on a red and blue background with the text "Michigan Midterms 2018"
Natalie Brennan

Today on Stateside, breaking down the results of the midterm elections, which saw record high numbers of voters participate. Plus, the leaders behind the ballot proposals to legalize recreational marijuana and change how congressional district lines are drawn talk about what comes next, after voters approved both measures. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Haley Stevens for Congress

As we move toward the midterm elections on November 6, Stateside has been having conversations with congressional candidates around the state. Today, we spoke with the 11th District's Democratic candidate Haley Stevens.

We reached out to Stevens' opponent, Republican Lena Epstein, for an interview. Her campaign staff has not responded. 

Tracy Samilton

There was little disagreement about supporting President Donald Trump's agenda at last night's first primary debate among Republicans running for Michigan's 11th Congressional District seat. 

Haberman is third Democrat to run to succeed Trott

Oct 5, 2017
Haberman for Congress Campaign

Dan Haberman, a Democrat, announced his candidacy today for Republican Dave Trott's U.S. House seat in the Detroit suburbs. Trott is not seeking re-election in 2018.

Haberman is a long-time resident of Birmingham and a Southeast Michigan businessman.

He said he will bring a problem-solving approach to government.

"The push to get government back to work for us is an essential driver, to get healthcare that works for all of us, an economy that works for all of us, and government that works for all of us," said Haberman.

lena epstein
Courtesy of Lena Epstein

Lena Epstein is ending her bid for a Michigan U.S. Senate seat.

The Republican candidate has decided to switch races and instead will run for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

The 11th District seat is currently held by Republican Congressman Dave Trott, who announced he would not seek re-election in 2018.

The sign posted at Rep. David Trott's Troy office.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

A group of Detroit-area Congressman Dave Trott’s (R-11th district) constituents tried again to meet with him on Tuesday.

And once again, they weren’t successful.

Some constituents accuse Trott of ducking meetings and public appearances since Donald Trump was elected.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and Rina Miller discuss who’ll be more hurt by low voter turnout on Tuesday, more Congressional race surprises, and a Detroit developer who dropped $3.1 million on some of the city's worst properties.


Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Republican candidate for Congress David Trott was the subject of some street theater this week.

Trott is running for the U.S. House seat in Metro Detroit’s 11th district.

He’s also a former co-owner of the Trott & Trott law firm, which specializes in home foreclosure work on behalf of banks. It prospered during the recent housing crisis, foreclosing on up to 80,000 homes in 2009 alone.

The three candidates running for Congress in the 11th District agreed on very little at a forum in Birmingham Monday - except the failure of the fourth candidate, businessman David Trott, to appear.

Bobby McKenzie, running as a Democrat, says he disagrees with many of the positions taken by  his opponents, "but showing up matters, and the three of us showed up. 

Mr. Trott was supposed to be here - didn't show up.  What kind of representative do you think he's gonna be?" he told a crowd at Seaholm High School.

Today is Election Day in local communities all across Michigan. But politicians being politicians, many are already looking ahead to next year’s statewide and congressional elections.

For everyone in the game, deciding whether to run is a matter of weighing hope versus experience; ambition against common sense. Sometimes, long shots pay off. On paper, it made no sense for a freshman senator to run for President six years ago, and not just because there was a formidable front-runner. 

The challenger was black. I thought his candidacy was hopeless. But as the world knows, I was gloriously wrong. However, back in 2000, Barack Obama was the one who was wrong. He challenged an incumbent congressman in a primary race. He lost by more than 2-1, drained his finances and strained his marriage for a time. Every situation is different.

But now, one of Michigan’s potentially biggest stars faces her own dilemma. Few have accomplished as much at a relatively early age as Jocelyn Benson. Barely 36 years old, she is already interim dean of Wayne State University law school. She has degrees from Wellesley, Oxford and Harvard Law. She has a stunning resume that includes stints working for the Southern Poverty Law Center, the NAACP, NPR and the revered federal appeals judge Damon Keith. 

Bobby McKenzie / Facebook

A former State Department official announced today he will begin his campaign for Congress in Michigan’s 11th District.

Bobby McKenzie, a Democrat known for his counterterrorism expertise, is running for the seat currently held by Republican Kerry Bentivolio.

The theme of the 11th Congressional District Republican establishment for the past couple of years might be “I Hope That Somethin’ Better Comes Along.” (We have kindly provided a link to that tune from “The Muppet Movie” sung by Rowlf the Dog and Kermit the Frog here. But we digress.)

The usual poobahs and potentates of the Oakland and Wayne county GOP circles have had to live with Rep. Kerry Bentivolio as their Republican in Congress since November of last year. But, this week, to the surprise of absolutely no one who has been paying attention, that Establishment may have gotten its wish when businessman/attorney David Trott announced he will challenge Bentivolio in a Republican primary.

And, in this case, the challenger probably starts with the advantage.

Commentary: The abbreviated congressman

Nov 8, 2012

I really don’t envy anybody, with the possible exception of my dog, who is going to spend his day napping while I run around Detroit. But part of me would like to be David Curson for the next few weeks.  Dave just got himself unexpectedly elected to Congress.

Voters in the 11th Congressional District in Michigan will send a Democratic UAW activist to Congress for the lame duck session in November and December -- and a Republican Tea Party activist to Congress for the full term starting in January.

Here's how it happened.  (The "why" may never be satisfactorily answered.)

Thaddeus McCotter is the five-term Republican Congressman who until July represented the strongly Republican-leaning 11th Congressional District. 

If you live in the 11th Congressional District and you're confused right now - it is NOT your fault. Here's a quick recap.

The 11th Congressional District became even more Republican after the most recent redistricting. So five-term incumbent Thaddeus McCotter was considered a shoe-in. That is, until it all fell apart in July.

Turns out some of McCotter's staff didn't get the 2,000 signatures needed to get their boss on the ballot.

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Kerry Bentivolio was fired from a teaching job.   In fact, Mr. Bentivolio, although he received written reprimands for yelling at students, left of his own accord.  We greatly regret the error.

 

The 11th Congressional District race is heating up.

The district was until recently represented by Thaddeus McCotter, before he resigned in a scandal over fake nominating petition signatures.