2019 state budget | Michigan Radio
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2019 state budget

Pontiac Silverdome demolition
Tony Brown / Michigan Radio

 


Today on Stateside, students across Michigan take to the streets to voice their concerns about climate change. Plus, the Pontiac Silverdome may be developed into an Amazon distribution center.

Picture of the Lansing capitol building
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The Legislature has sent a K-12 schools budget to Governor Gretchen Whitmer. The bill was adopted with the support of Republicans and Democrats. But the budget has a lot less money then what the governor’s’ recommended for special education and at-risk students.

“While the school aid budget passed by the Legislature includes some additional funding, it is still nowhere near what the governor proposed in her executive budget, and far short of what our children deserve,” the governor’s press secretary, Tiffany Brown, said in a statement.

Flint school lockers
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Republicans and Democrats in the state House have come to an agreement on the state’s K-12 education budget.

The details won’t be released until tomorrow when a committee will vote on the plan.

Michigan State Capitol Building
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The slow roll toward a partial state government shutdown continues in Lansing. Governor Gretchen Whitmer and Republican leaders aren’t talking, and each side says the other side is at fault.

Republicans say they won’t vote for the governor’s proposed gas tax increase. And they promise to start sending her budget bills this week with or without a deal.

Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey says he’s ready to negotiate until the last moment, but it’s up to Governor Whitmer to call the meeting.

layoff
Adobe Stock

The state has notified thousands of employees they could soon get layoff notices, unless Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the Legislature’s Republican leaders resolve a budget standoff.

Potholes on a road in Ann Arbor.
Daniel Hensel / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, after signs that a compromise on road funding might be on the horizon, negotiations over the state budget between Republican lawmakers and the governor stall again. Plus, Michigan food isn’t known for its tropical flavors, but we’ve got a cocktail might convince you otherwise.

gretchen whitmer and shane hernandez headshots
Michigan Governor's Office and Michigan House Republicans

 


The budget is the big news at the state capitol. The Republican-led state House and Senate have proposed $500 million in additional spending for the roads. Governor Gretchen Whitmer initially asked for $2 billion for the roads. 

In a turn-around from earlier this week, Governor Gretchen Whitmer says she’s ready to veto budget bills that don’t raise new money for roads. Republicans in the Legislature have teed up budgets to be adopted and sent to Whitmer’s desk as soon as next week.

That’s after talks between the Democratic governor and GOP leaders broke down this week. The rhetoric tossed between the Democratic governor and Republican leaders has grown increasingly tense.

Whitmer says, “They gotta do what they gotta do. Then I’m gonna do what I gotta do.”

Potholes on a road in Ann Arbor.
Daniel Hensel / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, Michigan’s House Minority Leader shares her reaction to the agreement between Governor Whitmer and Republican legislative leaders to remove the issue of road funding from state budget negotiations. Plus, we talk to Aimee Stephens, a transgender woman involved in an employment discrimination case that is scheduled to go before the United States Supreme Court in October. 

a postcard featuring an old steamer ship from Chicago
Public Domain

Today on Stateside, the latest on the road funding dispute between Governor Gretchen Whitmer and Republican leadership in the Michigan Legislature. Plus, while some retirees might be getting ready to head to Florida for the winter, one Florida couple recently uprooted their life to move to Michigan to avoid the worst effects of climate change.

test with bubble answers
mehmet / Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, we talk to Republican state House Speaker Lee Chatfield about the ongoing negotiations between Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the Legislature over road funding and the state budget. Plus, the forgotten history of how a Grand Rapids high school became the birthplace of vocational education.

a portrait of speaker of the Michigan house lee chatfield
Michigan House Republicans

A road repair funding dispute continues to stall the approval of the state’s 2020 budget. The deadline for approving a budget is October 1. But agreement on a new budget has so far eluded Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the GOP-led legislature, hung-up on the major snag of how to fund road repairs.

Black Civilian Conservation Corps in a group portrait.
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, negotiations over the state budget continue between Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the state Legislature. Plus, the 1930s program that rebuilt the forests of Northern Michigan after the age of lumber barons produced areas of massive clear cutting. 

With budget deadline looming, Gov. Whitmer pressures GOP legislators to reveal their road funding plan

The Lansing capitol dome with a blue sky behind it and trees in front of it
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

 


Today on Stateside, we get a preview of the top priorities for Michigan lawmakers as they return to Lansing Tuesday for the fall legislative session. Plus, why the number of full-time librarians in Michigan schools is shrinking, and what that means for students. 

Bill Lovis stands to left of Inca mummy
Michigan State University

Today on Stateside, we hear about a lawsuit, filed by the Michigan Republican Party, that aims to block an independent commission from redrawing legislative maps. Plus, we talk about the tough ethical choices people face when trying to do something about climate change.

a gas pump
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, Republican state legislators are considering ways to pay for road repairs, including one proposal that would allow counties and cities to levy their own local gas tax. Plus, Jerry Linenger was just 14-years-old when he watched the moon landing on a small black-and-white television screen. That moment would inspire him to pursue a career as an astronaut for NASA, where he manned three missions and traveled some 54 million miles in space. 

 

a team photo of the Muskegon Lassies
Courtesy of All-American Girls Professional Baseball League

 

 

Today on Stateside, an overview of the Michigan state legislature's most recent budget proposal, which would fund roads by borrowing against the state's teacher pension plan. Plus, a new study from the University of Michigan could help policymakers target resources to the Michigan counties hit hardest by the opioid crisis.

 

Arch rock on Mackinac Island
Viplav Valluri / Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

Today on Stateside, we talk to a business leader who wants legal protections for LGBTQ people, and a gay politician who says they are not needed. Plus, an updated system for driverless cars is being tested on the streets of Detroit. Are people ready for them?

Shayan Sanyal / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The state department in charge of Michigan’s prisons is not happy with a proposed spending plan in the state Legislature.

A spending plan for the Michigan Department of Corrections passed out of a state House committee. It would redirect millions of dollars that previous budgets had allocated for certain projects – like prison maintenance – to other priorities.

Picture of the Lansing capitol building
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Action on the state’s budget is expected to pick up this week.

The state Senate Appropriations committee will consider and possibly vote on multiple budgets – including for the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs and the Department of Health and Human Services.

Those budgets moving through the Senate include large cuts to what Governor Gretchen Whitmer recommended in her proposed budget. 

Amber McCann is a spokeswoman for Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey.

“It was strictly to put those discretionary dollars that we have at our disposal toward things, for instance, like accelerating road funding,” says McCann.

an old advertisement for a King designed car
Courtesy of Automotive Hall of Fame

 


Today on Stateside, we talk to Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel about criticisms of how her office is handling civil lawsuits involving the Flint water crisis. Plus, we dive into the life of one of Henry Ford's mentors, who beat him to Michigan's first drive in a car by about three months. 

Money
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan can expect to see some economic growth over the next few years – but for the most part, the state’s economy is expected to stay flat.

State money experts gathered with economists at the state’s Consensus Revenue Estimating Conference on Friday to figure out how much money will be in Michigan’s purse for the next budget.

The amount of money in the state’s general fund budget is expected to grow, but not by a lot. 

Majd Abdulghani
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, the newly-appointed chair of the House Appropriations Committee discusses today's Consensus Revenue Estimating Conference and how it will affect the state budget. Plus, a Michigan brewer on how the partial government shutdown is affecting his business.

Looking up into the rotunda of the Michigan Capitol.
user cedarbenddrive/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Gov. Rick Snyder signed the state’s general fund spending plan for fiscal year 2019 Thursday, and it includes a provision he says his administration won’t enforce.

That measure would cut funding to Planned Parenthood. It requires county health departments to favor family planning clinics that don’t offer abortions. 

Snyder said that provision is unconstitutional because there is a separate law that says how family planning money is distributed. It's already illegal in Michigan for public money to be directly used for abortions.

Michigan State Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

 

The Michigan Legislature approved a budget this week right before leaving for the summer recess. 

It would be impossible to go over everything in the budget, so Stateside sat down with two commentators to discuss some notable parts. 

Vicki Barnett is a former Mayor of Farmington Hills and Democratic legislator, and Ken Sikkema is a Senior Policy Fellow with Public Sector Consultants and the former Republican majority leader in the state Senate. 

Birth control pills.
Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 


The Michigan Legislature has approved a new budget that cuts funding to Planned Parenthood. The new provision would stop money for family planning and reproductive services from going to any group that also performs abortions. 

This budget now heads to Governor Snyder’s desk for final approval. 

Lori Carpentier is president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Michigan. She spoke with Stateside about implications of these potential cuts. 

Looking up into the rotunda of the Michigan Capitol.
user cedarbenddrive/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Governor Rick Snyder and state lawmakers just got a windfall of $315 million to spend in the new state budget. It’s the result of better-than-expected economic growth that yielded more tax revenue.

Michigan State Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

State lawmakers continue to plug away at crafting a budget for 2019.

The House passed its budget bills on April 24, and the Senate's bills passed last Thursday.

Now comes the task of ironing out differences between the two.

money
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Gov. Rick Snyder presented his final budget proposal for the upcoming fiscal year to the House and Senate this week. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle found things they did and didn't like about the governor's spending plan, which includes increased spending for roads and education.

This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about what else stood out in Snyder's budget.


Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Gov. Snyder wants the public to turn up the heat on state lawmakers over road funding.

At a Michigan Department of Transportation facility in Oakland County Thursday, Snyder said his push is partly about the entire 2019 budget he proposed this week. It has an additional $150 million for infrastructure projects.

But Snyder also wants to bring in another $175 million of what he calls some “one-time” supplemental money that’s already elsewhere in the budget to pay for some additional projects sooner.

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