2019 state budget | Michigan Radio
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2019 state budget

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Today on Stateside, the UAW’s International Executive Board meets to consider reforms in the face of the growing federal corruption probe into the union. Plus, as our series “Life on the Inside” continues, we’ll look at what it’s like to parent while you’re in prison.

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Today on Stateside, it’s Election Day! We’ll see what changes in voter registration and no-reason absentee voting has meant for voters and county clerks. Plus, the director of the Michigan Department of Corrections gives her answer to the question: what are prisons for?

Capitol Building in Lansing, MI
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Republicans in the Legislature have proposed what they say is a first step toward restoring widely unpopular budget cuts. Many of the cuts were enacted by a board controlled by Governor Gretchen Whitmer.

GOP leaders want to place new limits on Whitmer's ability to do the same thing in the future. And Whitmer quickly responded with a “no.”

The Michigan House of Representatives in Lansing
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Governor Gretchen Whitmer says she’s hopeful talks with the Legislature’s GOP leaders could soon lead to a new budget deal.

The state’s fiscal year began almost a month ago. But the governor says it’s not too late to restore money for county jails, rural healthcare, and the Pure Michigan ad campaign.

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Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer recently used a rare budget maneuver to shift funds around within state agencies. We take a look at the winners and losers of those shifts. Plus, a conversation about the economic potential of industrial hemp after the first legal harvest of the crop since 1937.    

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Today on Stateside, we talk to a business leader who wants legal protections for LGBTQ people, and a gay politician who says they are not needed. Plus, an updated system for driverless cars is being tested on the streets of Detroit. Are people ready for them?

Whiskey Point, at the west end of the harbor at Beaver Island.
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Today on Stateside, we hear the latest from Lansing after Governor Whitmer met with top Republican leaders in the state Legislature. Plus, what Michigan can learn from Norway’s prison and mental health systems. 

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Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the Legislature’s Republican leaders met Thursday. They are trying to find common ground this week following the governor’s sweeping line-item budget vetoes.

No agreements were reached, but all parties say the fact that the talks are continuing is a good sign. However, there is a growing sense of urgency among the people who run programs that are affected by the budget cuts. Those include local jails, human services, and charter schools.

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There could be another budget showdown looming in Lansing.

Republicans in the Legislature have set the stage for a showdown with Governor Gretchen Whitmer over 147 line-item budget vetoes. GOP lawmakers have drafted new budgets that would restore many of the vetoes.

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Today on Stateside, an update on the latest from Lansing as state House and Senate Republicans try to undo some of Governor Whitmer's 147 line-item vetoes. Plus, a former UAW official calls on the union to clean house.

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Today on Stateside, as the UAW strike against General Motors begins its fourth week, we hear from one striker on the picket line. Plus, how Governor Whitmer’s line item vetoes will impact charter schools and autism services in Michigan. 

Gov. Whitmer
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Governor Gretchen Whitmer continues to defend line item vetoes in budgets she otherwise approved last week.

But Whitmer also says it’s not too late to restore some of the spending.

Capitol Building in Lansing, MI
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After a combative budget cycle, state lawmakers want to find common ground on policy issues.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer would like to get leaders in the state Legislature back to the table to come up with a new spending bill. One that uses the almost one billion dollars that Whitmer line-item vetoed in the budget.

But GOP lawmakers say the budget is done and it’s time to focus on policy issues.             

Here are the winners and the losers in Michigan’s new budget

Oct 4, 2019
Cheyna Roth / Michigan Radio

After months of negotiations, twists, stalemates and unprecedented moves, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer finalized the state budget this week just in time to avoid the first government shutdown in a decade.

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Governor Gretchen Whitmer wants Republican leaders to come to the bargaining table.

Earlier this week, Whitmer announced more than 100 line item vetoes that she made in the state budgets, and she moved money around within departments (that’s something she can do without the approval of the Legislature).

During a press conference on Wednesday, Whitmer announced that she wants to take a lot of the money that won’t be spent on the items she vetoed, and put those toward a new supplemental budget.

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Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer explains the reasoning behind her 147 line-item vetoes in the state budget she signed Monday night. Plus, Congresswoman Debbie Dingell and Congressman Fred Upton talk about civility in an era of partisanship and division. 

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Today on Stateside, how Governor Gretchen Whitmer used line-item vetoes to retool the state budget crafted by the Republican-controlled Legislature. Plus, we speak to the superintendent of a rural school district that could be the first in Michigan to let staff carry guns.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer (D) released a list of line-item vetoes and asked a state board to approve funding shifts as the stage is set for a new round of budget bargaining with GOP leaders.
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Governor Gretchen Whitmer used her executive powers to cut funding and move money to better reflect her priorities in the new state budget. 

profile shot of Gretchen Whitmer
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Governor Gretchen Whitmer has vetoed $375 million in one-time road funding. The governor finished signing all 16 state budgets hours before the October 1st deadline.

Whitmer says she had to make the 147 line-item vetoes to protect Michigan residents. In a recorded statement on Instagram, Whitmer said the budgets sent to her by the Republican-controlled Legislature were “built on phony numbers, using funds in the wrong way, usurping executive power. These are important things that I had to eliminate from these budgets.”

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Today on Stateside, the state budget needs to be approved by Governor Gretchen Whitmer tonight to avoid a partial government shutdown. But the governor has been vocal about her displeasure with the bills sent to her by the state Legislature. So what are her options? Plus, how can Michigan do more to recruit and retain a diverse teaching staff? 

Michigan Capitol Building
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All state employees are expected to show up for work Tuesday. That’s because Governor Gretchen Whitmer is expected to sign budget bills Monday and avert a partial shutdown of state government at midnight.

The Democratic governor pressed the Legislature’s GOP majorities to increase the gas tax and put more money toward roads and schools. Republicans said no and sent her budget bills last week to sign or veto by Monday. The standoff led the Whitmer administration to notify state employees that layoffs could be on the way.

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Today on Stateside, what impact does the impeachment inquiry into President Trump have on the auto industry? Plus, a new memoir about the price people pay when they are displaced from their true roots, generation after generation.

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Governor Gretchen Whitmer has been presented a budget by the state Legislature, but one area where Whitmer might have an issue with the budget is the state’s new redistricting commission.

Last November, Michigan’s voters approved a ballot initiative to create an independent redistricting commission. That commission costs money, for example to pay the salaries of the board members.

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Today on Stateside, the GOP-controlled Michigan Legislature passed a new budget. Governor Gretchen Whitmer declared it "a mess." What are her options now? Plus, a Detroit man returns home after being incarcerated in China for three years.

State capitol in Lansing Michigan
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Governor Gretchen Whitmer says the budgets on their way to her desk are “a mess.”

The Legislature voted out the rest of the state budgets Tuesday, including the education and transportation budgets.

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Today on Stateside, students across Michigan take to the streets to voice their concerns about climate change. Plus, the Pontiac Silverdome may be developed into an Amazon distribution center.

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The Legislature has sent a K-12 schools budget to Governor Gretchen Whitmer. The bill was adopted with the support of Republicans and Democrats. But the budget has a lot less money then what the governor’s’ recommended for special education and at-risk students.

“While the school aid budget passed by the Legislature includes some additional funding, it is still nowhere near what the governor proposed in her executive budget, and far short of what our children deserve,” the governor’s press secretary, Tiffany Brown, said in a statement.

Flint school lockers
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Republicans and Democrats in the state House have come to an agreement on the state’s K-12 education budget.

The details won’t be released until tomorrow when a committee will vote on the plan.

Michigan State Capitol Building
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The slow roll toward a partial state government shutdown continues in Lansing. Governor Gretchen Whitmer and Republican leaders aren’t talking, and each side says the other side is at fault.

Republicans say they won’t vote for the governor’s proposed gas tax increase. And they promise to start sending her budget bills this week with or without a deal.

Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey says he’s ready to negotiate until the last moment, but it’s up to Governor Whitmer to call the meeting.

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The state has notified thousands of employees they could soon get layoff notices, unless Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the Legislature’s Republican leaders resolve a budget standoff.

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