2019 state budget | Michigan Radio
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2019 state budget

a gas pump
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, Republican state legislators are considering ways to pay for road repairs, including one proposal that would allow counties and cities to levy their own local gas tax. Plus, Jerry Linenger was just 14-years-old when he watched the moon landing on a small black-and-white television screen. That moment would inspire him to pursue a career as an astronaut for NASA, where he manned three missions and traveled some 54 million miles in space. 

 

a team photo of the Muskegon Lassies
Courtesy of All-American Girls Professional Baseball League

 

 

Today on Stateside, an overview of the Michigan state legislature's most recent budget proposal, which would fund roads by borrowing against the state's teacher pension plan. Plus, a new study from the University of Michigan could help policymakers target resources to the Michigan counties hit hardest by the opioid crisis.

 

Arch rock on Mackinac Island
Viplav Valluri / Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

Today on Stateside, we talk to a business leader who wants legal protections for LGBTQ people, and a gay politician who says they are not needed. Plus, an updated system for driverless cars is being tested on the streets of Detroit. Are people ready for them?

Shayan Sanyal / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The state department in charge of Michigan’s prisons is not happy with a proposed spending plan in the state Legislature.

A spending plan for the Michigan Department of Corrections passed out of a state House committee. It would redirect millions of dollars that previous budgets had allocated for certain projects – like prison maintenance – to other priorities.

Picture of the Lansing capitol building
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Action on the state’s budget is expected to pick up this week.

The state Senate Appropriations committee will consider and possibly vote on multiple budgets – including for the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs and the Department of Health and Human Services.

Those budgets moving through the Senate include large cuts to what Governor Gretchen Whitmer recommended in her proposed budget. 

Amber McCann is a spokeswoman for Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey.

“It was strictly to put those discretionary dollars that we have at our disposal toward things, for instance, like accelerating road funding,” says McCann.

an old advertisement for a King designed car
Courtesy of Automotive Hall of Fame

 


Today on Stateside, we talk to Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel about criticisms of how her office is handling civil lawsuits involving the Flint water crisis. Plus, we dive into the life of one of Henry Ford's mentors, who beat him to Michigan's first drive in a car by about three months. 

Money
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan can expect to see some economic growth over the next few years – but for the most part, the state’s economy is expected to stay flat.

State money experts gathered with economists at the state’s Consensus Revenue Estimating Conference on Friday to figure out how much money will be in Michigan’s purse for the next budget.

The amount of money in the state’s general fund budget is expected to grow, but not by a lot. 

Majd Abdulghani
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, the newly-appointed chair of the House Appropriations Committee discusses today's Consensus Revenue Estimating Conference and how it will affect the state budget. Plus, a Michigan brewer on how the partial government shutdown is affecting his business.

Looking up into the rotunda of the Michigan Capitol.
user cedarbenddrive/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Gov. Rick Snyder signed the state’s general fund spending plan for fiscal year 2019 Thursday, and it includes a provision he says his administration won’t enforce.

That measure would cut funding to Planned Parenthood. It requires county health departments to favor family planning clinics that don’t offer abortions. 

Snyder said that provision is unconstitutional because there is a separate law that says how family planning money is distributed. It's already illegal in Michigan for public money to be directly used for abortions.

Michigan State Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

 

The Michigan Legislature approved a budget this week right before leaving for the summer recess. 

It would be impossible to go over everything in the budget, so Stateside sat down with two commentators to discuss some notable parts. 

Vicki Barnett is a former Mayor of Farmington Hills and Democratic legislator, and Ken Sikkema is a Senior Policy Fellow with Public Sector Consultants and the former Republican majority leader in the state Senate. 

Birth control pills.
Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 


The Michigan Legislature has approved a new budget that cuts funding to Planned Parenthood. The new provision would stop money for family planning and reproductive services from going to any group that also performs abortions. 

This budget now heads to Governor Snyder’s desk for final approval. 

Lori Carpentier is president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Michigan. She spoke with Stateside about implications of these potential cuts. 

Looking up into the rotunda of the Michigan Capitol.
user cedarbenddrive/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Governor Rick Snyder and state lawmakers just got a windfall of $315 million to spend in the new state budget. It’s the result of better-than-expected economic growth that yielded more tax revenue.

Michigan State Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

State lawmakers continue to plug away at crafting a budget for 2019.

The House passed its budget bills on April 24, and the Senate's bills passed last Thursday.

Now comes the task of ironing out differences between the two.

money
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Gov. Rick Snyder presented his final budget proposal for the upcoming fiscal year to the House and Senate this week. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle found things they did and didn't like about the governor's spending plan, which includes increased spending for roads and education.

This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about what else stood out in Snyder's budget.


Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Gov. Snyder wants the public to turn up the heat on state lawmakers over road funding.

At a Michigan Department of Transportation facility in Oakland County Thursday, Snyder said his push is partly about the entire 2019 budget he proposed this week. It has an additional $150 million for infrastructure projects.

But Snyder also wants to bring in another $175 million of what he calls some “one-time” supplemental money that’s already elsewhere in the budget to pay for some additional projects sooner.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This week, Gov. Snyder rolls out his final budget plan.

He’s promised more money for K-12 education.   

In his State of the State address last month, Snyder promised the largest increase in minimum per pupil funding in 15 years. We’ll find out exactly how much that will be when his budget plan is delivered to state lawmakers on Wednesday.

Michigan teachers will be closely watching.

The Michigan Education Association calls news media reports saying the governor will propose a $233 increase “promising.”