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Art

An excerpt from "Men to Avoid in Art and Life."
Courtesy of Chronicle Books

  

You never know what can happen on Twitter. Just ask Nicole Tersigni, a writer and comedian currently based in metro Detroit. What started as a single joke on her Twitter evolved into a viral tweet thread, which ultimately became a book that was published this month. The topic — and title — is Men to Avoid in Art and Life

a photo of "Beach Finds II" which is a light blue box filled with vials laid out in front
Courtesy of Geo Rutherford

Today on Stateside, we'll talk about the biggest races and issues on the August 4 primary ballot. Plus, a conversation with the Michigan Teacher of the Year about the return to school and what it means for his students to have a transgender adult to look up to in their lives.

GM towers
Elishia Jayye / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, what big funders and foundations can do to make sure arts groups are welcoming to everyone. Plus, an update on how the auto industry is faring during the pandemic.

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Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

tvol / www.flickr.com

The Board of Directors of the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD) announced Wednesday it had “terminated its relationship” with Executive Director Elysia Borowy-Reeder, following staff allegations of mistreatment and racial bias. Borowry-Reeder had been put on leave earlier this month.   

 

Michigan football stadium
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer has been vocal about her decision to only reopen schools if public health officials agree it is safe.

What are the discussions happening between the Governor and the Republican led legislature regarding schools and education funding? Plus a conversation with former Detroit Institute of Arts and Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit employees about systemic racism in art institutions. Also, we spoke with the reporter who wrote about University of Michigan football star Jon Vaughn’s story of survival in “an ecosystem of abuse.”

DAN WANSCHURA / Interlochen Public Radio

Today on Stateside, we dig into the history of King James Jesse Strang— a self-professed mormon monarch who held court on Beaver Island. Plus, we look back on the worst oil spill into an inland waterway in US history, which took place here in Michigan.

people on a zoom chat with the words house calls at the top
University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities

Without gallery openings or open studios, artists are heading online to connect with their audience. A new YouTube series from the Institute for the Humanities at the University of Michigan is giving them a platform to do just that. 

Drummond Island as seen from DeTour Village
Lindsey Fountain

Today on Stateside, we check in with a fire department, an animal rescue group, and homeless advocates to see what work is like for them during the record-setting cold weather. We also talk with an artist whose first large-scale museum exhibition was inspired by her time in Flint. 

A long table surrounded by red chairs in a school classroom.
BES Photos / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan's funding for schools has declined more than any other state, according to a new study. We get reaction from the state senator who chairs the committee overseeing K-12 funding. Plus, an exhibit by a new artist-in-residence at the University of Michigan paints an apocalyptic environmental future over nostalgic images of America's past. 

Elissa Slotkin
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Today on Stateside, U.S. Representative Elissa Slotkin (D-Holly) tells us what she thinks it will take to end the longest partial federal government shutdown in United States history, now in its fifth week.  Plus, we hear about some up-and-coming artists in the Detroit's music scene, and say goodbye to a legendary guitarist from the city. 

Dawn Bennett Dailey at the Kalamazoo Institute of Art
Long Haul Productions

Creating Connection Michigan is a series of intimate, first-person stories about the power of art to change lives. This week, we hear from a Kalamazoo woman whose art-making helped her cope with tragic losses.

Michigan State University sign
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we talk to one of the recently-elected members of the Michigan State University Board of Trustees about what changes she wants to see at the university. Plus, new West Michigan music that ranges from folk to psychedelic rock.

Otis Cornelius works on a piece of glass
Long Haul Productions

Stateside is featuring intimate, first-person stories about the power of art in a new series called Creating Connection Michigan. Over the next five Tuesdays, you'll hear from Michiganders across the state about how local art programs have changed their lives.

We begin the series with Otis Cornelius, a student at Fired Up, a Benton Harbor glassworking program, and Lynne Clayton, the executive director at Water Street Glassworks.

Brendan standing in front of artoo detoo and a monster painting
Jodi Westrick/Michigan Radio

Detroit artist Brendan Patrick lost his vision, and nearly his life, to cystic fibrosis. Now he's making the most of the time he's been given by creating art and raising awareness of his disease.


Artist installs mosaics in Eastern Market potholes

Sep 17, 2018
Chicago artist Jim Bachor installs a tile mosaic in a pothole at the corner of Winder and Orleans St.
Catherine Shaffer / Michigan Radio

Over a hundred murals decorate the buildings in and around Detroit's Eastern Market. This year, as part of the Murals in the Market event, artist Jim Bachor is installing ten authentic tile mosaics in potholes around the market.

quilt from project
Courtesy of Migrant Quilt Project

An Arizona quiltmaker is exploring one of the most contentious issues in the U.S. today: immigration.

Her traveling exhibition, “Beyond the Border Wall: The Migrant Quilt Project,” will open next week in Grand Haven’s Loutit District Library. 

Allana St. Laurents standing in front of photographs
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The Ann Arbor Art Fair is underway, and as usual, it is a huge event. This year's fair features around 1,000 artists, and will draw thousands more visitors to the city's downtown.

Stateside's Lester Graham braved the the crowds and the traffic to talk to some of the artists showcasing their work, and the people who came to see it all. 

The Dotty Wotty House, The Heidelberg Project.
Courtesy of The Heidelberg Project.

The first ever Detroit Art Week is set to run July 20, 21, and 22. Organizers bill it as "a self-guided tour and celebration of contemporary art and culture in Detroit."

Amani Olu, the founder and executive director of Detroit Art Week, joined Stateside to tell us about the event.

One of the women crowned with a henna tattoo in Crowns of Courage
Kristen Hernandez

 

Stateside loves to hear from listeners with ideas for stories and people we should cover. Here's a great tip we got from Stateside listener, George Bollinger: Crowns of Courage

The art of decorating the body with henna is truly ancient, going back over 5,000 years.

 

The intricate henna tattoos might be applied simply for their beauty, or they can symbolize passages in life. 

Johnson's Sambo Princess prints hanging in the exhibit
Photo courtesy of Paul Johnson

 


 

Detroit artist Paul Johnson has produced a lot of work that explores the female form — a curvy, tiny-waisted, large-and-drooping-eyed figure. 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

A unique collection of Inuit art is being given to the University of Michigan Museum of Art. More than 200 stone sculptures and prints from the Inuit people on Baffin Island in Canada, just west of Greenland. The collection is valued at $2.5 million. There are additional funds to endow an Inuit art program. These gifts from from Phil and Kathy Power.

The story behind the collection is as interesting as the art itself. Phil Power gave Lester Graham a tour of the collection in this extended version of the interview.

Casa de Rosado / Facebook

Turning shame into pride.

That’s the idea behind an exhibit of black velvet paintings. It’s called “Black Velvet: A Rasquache Aesthetic,” and it’s happening at the Latino Cultural Center in Detroit's Mexicantown.

Carl Wilson linoart print
Carl Wilson

It's funny how the smallest details about someone we love can stay with us.

For example: a scent. Any whiff of Shalimar instantly makes host Cynthia Canty think of her great-Aunt Verne because it was her signature perfume.

For artist Carl Wilson, it's the memory of the chewing gum his mother always had in her purse — and that led to the title for his first solo museum exhibition.

THE QUILT INDEX

For six years now, the Detroit Unity Temple has held a quilt exhibit in February. Many of the quilts – but not all – are tributes to African-American history. This year a quilt that’s getting a lot of attention is called “Strange Fruit."

Courtesy of Michael Hyacinthe and Kevin Kammeraad

You can help kids read books. And you can help as they draw pictures. But an app created in West Michigan blends the two together. It’s called Wimage, from the combination of “words” and “image.”

It’s being taken into classrooms where students are able to combine their imaginations with the app’s technology. And it’s also being used in art therapy, to help wounded veterans heal through art.

Eat Pomegranate Photography / Courtesy of the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum

 

 

Two iconic Michigan artists are in the spotlight, thanks to an important exhibition at the Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University.

 

The works of Jim Shaw and the late Mike Kelley are being displayed in an exhibition at the MSU Broad called "Michigan Stories: Mike Kelley and Jim Shaw." It is running through February 25th.

 

picture of kelly church holding cradle board
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Soon, the entire park-like area we’re in will echo with the sound of pounding, metal against wood. It’s nearly a ringing or gong-like sound.

But first, Jeff Strand strips the bark from a black ash tree log. Then he takes out a knife and scores the end of it, a sort of pie wedge cut.

“So that the undergrowth rings have relief, so they’ll come up out of it as I’m crushing the growth rings. The ax is for crushing the fibers in between the growth rings and when you do that, they release,” Strand explains.

Lindsey Scullen / Michigan Radio

You create a special space for children with special needs: the Friendship Circle.

It’s a great success, but what do you offer those children when they grow up?

young woman at Science Gallery Lab
Courtesy of Jeff Grabill

The Next Idea

Science Gallery has been described as a place where science and art collide. The result? Creative ways to tackle some of the world's biggest problems.

The first Science Gallery Lab is in Dublin. Now, Michigan State University is launching Science Gallery Lab Detroit.

The Wall Speaks / Wojtek Sawa

 

“If we can feel sad for what happened to children in Poland, we can equally feel sad about what is happening to children in the Middle East.”

That’s the message that artist Wojtek Sawa and community space owner Alissa Shelton want to bring to the people of Hamtramck.

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