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arts and culture

a picture of a brick building on Albion College's campus
Albion College

On Stateside, how can schools keep COVID-19 cases under control on campus, while also holding in-person classes? Albion College is hoping that their pandemic pod model might be the answer. Also, why the spectacular skies caused by Western wildfires are a reminder of the collective stakes of climate change. And finally, we hear from members of an artist collective that questions white people's fascination with—and sometimes fetishization of—Indigenous culture.

books lined up
Jessica Ruscello / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, a long-time educator discussed how racism and Black history is taught in schools. Plus, a cultural arts center in Detroit that’s finding ways to survive when the economy crumbles but the mission is more important than ever. And Congresswoman Brenda Lawrence (MI-14) discussed Juneteenth, and the need for a national dialogue about reparations.

(Subscribe to Stateside on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or with this RSS link)

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

Joe Pera in a still from his show
Courtesy of Joe Pera

Comedian Joe Pera is not from Marquette. But the version of himself he plays in the television series Joe Pera Talks With You is recognizable to anyone familiar with the Upper Peninsula.

The show has become a runaway hit on Cartoon Network's Adult Swim nighttime block. Pera's oddball observations on subjects like beans and grocery stores are weirdly hilarious. But what really makes the series is that Pera is not just being funny. 

George N'Namdi, Davida Artis, and Anthony Artis smile in front of a brick wall
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

For a long time, the work of African American artists didn't get much recognition in the world of fine art. That hasn't stopped art lovers from building impressive collections of pieces by black artists. We talked to two collectors about their approach to buying, and how the business of African American art has changed over the years.

Darryl DeAngelo Terrell sits in a wicker peacock chair with two men on either side of them
Courtesy of Darryl DeAngelo Terrell

We all have a version of ourselves that lives in our head. Your favorite self, your strongest self, the self this worldㅡ for whatever reasonㅡ doesn't want to let you be. For queer and gender non-binary artists, that self isn't just a daydream. It's someone who might get you through years of being made to feel like an outsider. It might also be a canvas for important ideas.

Someone dialing 911 on a smart phone
Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, a Saginaw case led to a federal appeals court ruling that chalking tires to track how long a car has been parked is unconstitutional. Plus, we talk to the high school student who will be representing Michigan at the national Poetry Out Loud competition in D.C.

women posing at a Holi event
Razi Jafri / Michigan Radio

It's finally here! Wednesday's vernal equinox marks the first day of spring. Celebrations marking the transition from the dark days of winter into a gentler season are part of cultural traditions across the world. 

Mary Stewart Adams, a star lore historian and the founder of Michigan's only international dark sky park, joined Stateside to tell us more about why the equinox has received so much attention throughout time.

a sample of poison wallpaper - it's light green with blue stripes and floral decoration
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, despite an upward economic trend in Michigan, nearly half of households in the state are struggling to afford basic necessities. Plus, it’s (finally) spring! We hear about the cultural significance of this transition for different cultural groups across the state.

person weighing weed on scale
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, Michigan regulators allow unlicensed dispensaries and growers to reopen in midst of a medical marijuana shortage. Plus, a software engineer who traded building software for building kitchen cabinets.

3 members of 7 Bold Banana Slugs
Long Haul Productions

Stateside is featuring intimate, first-person stories about the power of art in a new series called Creating Connection Michigan.

Today, we hear from Penny, a camper at Girls Rock Detroit. It’s a program where girls ages 8 to 15 form a band, learn how to play an instrument, write a song, and perform it in front of a live audience – all in the course of a week. 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Mike Cameron and Michael Konas are the co-founders and creative forces behind Dog Might Games. 

If you visit their woodshop, you’ll first be greeted by a dog. He’s a rescue.

Dog Might Games says it doesn’t have customers; it has fans. The fans named the dog “Sawdust.”

Rahael Gupta
Michigan Radio

On today's show, Believed co-host Kate Wells breaks down a recent report that found top officials at the U.S. Olympic Committee knew former sports doctor Larry Nassar was sexually abusing his patients, yet took no disciplinary action against him. Plus, a conversation about the changing field of classical music between a graduate student and aspiring conductor, and the retired music director for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Steven Piper

Today, Stateside speaks with Michigan’s new Governor-elect Gretchen Whitmer to discuss her top priorities when she takes office, the Line 5 pipeline, and her plans to work with the Republican leadership in the state Legislature. Plus, Tunde Olaniran, a Flint native and staple of the Detroit music scene, discusses his new album with us.

betty ford dancing with husband
Gerald R. Ford Museum

 


Today on Stateside, what does Governor Rick Snyder's agreement with Enbridge Energy actually mean for the future of the Line 5 pipeline? Plus, a conversation with the author of a new book on First Lady Betty Ford's legacy.

Bird electric scooter
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, why the auto industry is breathing "a sigh of relief" after President Trump announced the trilateral trade deal that will replace NAFTA. Plus, an Oscoda resident shares his experience of being affected by PFAS contamination, kicking off Michigan Radio's week-long series on contamination by the chemicals across the state.    

author steve hamilton
Franco Vogt / Courtesy of Steve Hamilton

 


This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Alex McKnight mystery series, and author Steve Hamilton is still turning out new books.

His most recent, the 11th in the series, is Dead Man Running

Hamilton joined Stateside’s Cynthia Canty to discuss this new novel and his surprising journey to becoming an award-winning writer.

Courtesty artist Sheefy McFly

Michigan has gotten plenty of mileage out of Tim Allen's voice spreading the word about Pure Michigan as a travel destination.

Now, the talents of a Detroit artist will lure Chicagoans to come visit Michigan's big cities.

Brotha James

This month’s check-in with Local Spins editor and publisher, John Sinkevics, takes a look at musicians plying their trade in the northern climes of the Lower Peninsula.

Sinkevics joined Stateside to highlight new work by Jake Allen, Brotha James, and Joshua Davis.

1969 Ann Arbor Blues Festival
Baron Wolman

This summer begins a year-long celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Ann Arbor Blues Festival. The festivities kick off with a photo exhibit at the Ann Arbor Art Fair next week. The photos feature behind-the-scenes images from the 1969-1970 festivals.

A group of Sae Jong Campers
Sae Jong Camp

 


Summer camp means many things to campers, outdoor fun or just a chance to get away from parents and siblings.

For kids who come to Sae Jong Camp on Higgins Lake, it is also chance to be with others who share their heritage.

Sae Jong Camp is the nation's oldest continuously running Korean-American overnight summer camp.

It's held each year at Camp Westminster in Roscommon drawing campers from all around the country. This year marks the 44th anniversary of Sae Jong Camp.

painting of man on table with doctors above him
Mario Moore / Courtesy of David Klein Gallery


Is it possible for a black man to rest in an institutionally oppressive society? 

That is the question Mario Moore wants to tackle in his art. 

Moore is mixed-medium artist and a Detroit native. He sat down with Stateside to discuss his new exhibition “Recovering” which opens this weekend at the David Kline Gallery in downtown Detroit. 

still from cartoon Big City Greens
© 2018 Disney Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved.

The Disney Channel has just rolled out a new animated kid series called Big City Greens.

Chris and Shane Houghton, brothers and co-creators of Big City Greens, grew up in Clinton County, Michigan in the small town of St. Johns.

The television show is about a family that moves from the countryside to the big city. The family’s trajectory is not unlike that of Chris and Shane, who moved from a small town in Michigan to the big metropolis that is Los Angeles.

Mercedes Mejia/Michigan Radio

“When I first go on stage I’m nervous, but as I go I feel exhilarated. I feel like I am the only one out there and that’s amazing.”

the band nessa
Nessa

Let’s talk about Celtic music. Nessa, a Southeast Michigan band, re-imagines the ballads and dance tunes of the old Celtic world, bringing in a wide range of musical styles.

The ensemble is led by Kelly McDermott, who plays the flute and sings. She joined Stateside to talk about her musical influences, Celtic fusion, and the release of her new EP, Travel Walk to Celtica, produced by Brian Bill.

Wikimedia Commons / Van Vechten Collection at Library of Congress

 

 

This time, David Kiley of Encore Michigan brings us an eclectic mix of shows from theaters across Michigan.

 

Listen above to hear Kiley’s previews of the following shows:

Sheila Y / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Tonight, silent French films from the early 20th century will play at the Max M. Fisher Music Center in Detroit as part of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra’s French Festival. But there’s a twist: the films won’t actually be silent. They will be accompanied by the live performance of original scores by the Andrew Alden Ensemble

Courtesy of Ice Dreams Sculptures

For most of us, working in subzero temperatures doesn’t sound like the dream job. But the cold doesn't seem to bother World Championship ice carver Tajana Raukar.

Raukar is the owner of Ice Dreams Sculptures in Plymouth. It's cold in her studio, and she's wearing full on winter gear. 

actors on stage
Lisa Gavan

 


Each time a show opened at the Ann Arbor Civic Theatre, Alexandra Berneis would send an email. As the theater's executive director, Berneis had a strong relationship with Jen McKee, the local critic at The Ann Arbor News. It was a symbiotic one: invitation, access, coverage, repeat.

Then one day in January 2016, she didn’t get an email back. The critic and other colleagues lost their jobs. Mainstream arts coverage in Ann Arbor was gone.

Michigan communities have been experiencing this with increasing frequency over several years. As the internet changed how people got their news, media entities shifted and consolidated, and arts communities across the state are feeling the loss.

actors in god of carnage on stage
Sean Carter Photography / Courtesy of the Purple Rose Theatre

Theater happenings around Michigan this week range from a sequel to the Phantom of the Opera to a show about systemic racism.

David Kiley of Encore Michigan joined Stateside to talk about those shows and more.

two people standing at a microphone
Courtesy of Relato:Detroit / Facebook

The Metro Detroit area is incredibly culturally diverse. The region is home to more than 30 languages, and in more than 600-thousand homes, a language other than English is spoken at the dinner table.

The group Relato:Detroit wants to bring those immigrant or bilingual speakers into the storytelling fold.

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